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Throughout history, a secret society called the Invisibles, who count among their number Lord Byron and Percy Shelley, work against the forces of order that seek to repress humanity's growth. In this first collection, the Invisibles' latest recruit, a teenage lout from the streets of London, must survive a bizarre, mind-altering training course before being projected into Throughout history, a secret society called the Invisibles, who count among their number Lord Byron and Percy Shelley, work against the forces of order that seek to repress humanity's growth. In this first collection, the Invisibles' latest recruit, a teenage lout from the streets of London, must survive a bizarre, mind-altering training course before being projected into the past to help enlist the Marquis de Sade. Collects Volume 1, Issues #1-8


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Throughout history, a secret society called the Invisibles, who count among their number Lord Byron and Percy Shelley, work against the forces of order that seek to repress humanity's growth. In this first collection, the Invisibles' latest recruit, a teenage lout from the streets of London, must survive a bizarre, mind-altering training course before being projected into Throughout history, a secret society called the Invisibles, who count among their number Lord Byron and Percy Shelley, work against the forces of order that seek to repress humanity's growth. In this first collection, the Invisibles' latest recruit, a teenage lout from the streets of London, must survive a bizarre, mind-altering training course before being projected into the past to help enlist the Marquis de Sade. Collects Volume 1, Issues #1-8

29 review for The Invisibles, Volume 1: Say You Want a Revolution

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    What hath God Grant Morrison wrought? Have you ever had those dreams where you start out doing something, get sidetracked as different events build on one another? You still desperately want to get back to point A, but try as you might, you find yourself lost in a nightmare with no reference point – mentally ragged and irritable. If you have these types of dreams, you can appreciate this volume. Or not. Dane McGowan, is a young punk from Liverpool who loves anarchy and rebellion. And being from Liv What hath God Grant Morrison wrought? Have you ever had those dreams where you start out doing something, get sidetracked as different events build on one another? You still desperately want to get back to point A, but try as you might, you find yourself lost in a nightmare with no reference point – mentally ragged and irritable. If you have these types of dreams, you can appreciate this volume. Or not. Dane McGowan, is a young punk from Liverpool who loves anarchy and rebellion. And being from Liverpool gives Morrison the excuse to drag in poor John Lennon and some weird mix of arcane Beatle references and doggerel stuff. Let’s give it a go: Canapes sweeping like plasticine ties, Through the bathroom window nuns chanting By Rosemary and Time via the guru down the lane Hey, that was fun! Uh, okay… Anyway, McGowan joins The Invisibles, leaves The Invisibles, hangs out with a mystical homeless dude… …rejoins The Invisibles and time trips back to the French Revolution to hang with the Marquis de Sade. There’s a variety of different story elements that go absolutely nowhere and are just thrown in to keep the reader of balance or just to amuse Morrison and yet, not surprisingly never seem to hang together. And don’t get me started on the more disturbing elements and imagery in this book. Here’s some pseudo-something or other to wash your palette. *sob* Bottom Line: This was published in the ‘90’s when creators were trying to raise this medium to an art form. Still, it’s better than the Spider-Man Clone saga. The word “legend” gets bandied about a lot on the cover of this book. I can appreciate Morrison’s attempts to separate himself from the super-hero pack, but his head seems to be up his rear end for the most part, but edgy people in the comix biz dug this kind of off-kilter storytelling and gave it legs. It’s like art critics legitimizing someone like Jackson Pollock and helping usher in abstract expressionism, which is also not my cuppa either. There are plenty of reviews praising this series on Goodreads, but my tastes run more to the low brow, meat and potatoes comics. Jeff, I think the word your searching for is “shallow”. And for the record, I don’t hate Grant Morrison, just most of his attempts to meld comic book story telling with heavy opium use. Oh, yeah, the alien abduction revelation via an acid trip. And the puppet show in India…. Pass the hookah to the right!

  2. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    When I started to get into comics in college, it was the britwave authors who I found most appealing: Moore, Gaiman, Delano, Ellis, Ennis, Milligan, and Morrison. But when I tried to read Morrison's Magnum Opus, I found none of the careful structuring or intelligent dialogue which I was hoping for. In disappointment, I threw down Morrison's book and it was a long time before I gave him another chance. But when I did, I read WE3 , Morrison's cleanest and least pretentious story. I still have tr When I started to get into comics in college, it was the britwave authors who I found most appealing: Moore, Gaiman, Delano, Ellis, Ennis, Milligan, and Morrison. But when I tried to read Morrison's Magnum Opus, I found none of the careful structuring or intelligent dialogue which I was hoping for. In disappointment, I threw down Morrison's book and it was a long time before I gave him another chance. But when I did, I read WE3 , Morrison's cleanest and least pretentious story. I still have trouble reconciling the author who penned that excellent little story with the one who produced this sprawling indulgence. Determined to give Morrison another chance, I read The Filth, Seaguy, and Kill Your Boyfriend and, pleasantly surprised, decided I should give Invisibles another chance. Unfortunately, I have found it no more appealing the second time around. But I'm hardly alone in failing to connect with it. Since my similar disappointment with Animal Man, I have been trying to conceptualize precisely why these stories are so different from the clever, well-structured writing of some of his other books; sometimes, the man is a great storyteller, but other times grows inflated and confused. Perhaps it is a case like Neal Stephenson's, where the author strives for greater complexity, indulging in his passions, but failing to connect such disparate elements with competent pacing and larger ideas. Many authors, when writing a personal story, grow too close to the material, which prevents them from conscientious self-editing. It is not hard to imagine that Morrison wishes he could be like Moore in this regard, since Moore ties together complex storylines and experimental plotting without losing the audience along the way, and makes it look easy. However, I feel I begin to agree with Moorcock's critique of Morrison as not quite skilled enough to reach his own lofty goals. Of course, Moorcock's critique of plagiarism grows a bit weaker in my eyes after comparing his Gloriana to the Titus Groan books. I find Morrison's complexity outstrips his skill here, though I should note that he was working on scripting for five or six other books at the time, including the enjoyable Flex Mentallo and even better Kill Your Boyfriend. The art of the early Invisibles was also of a lower quality, often simplified without being elegant and with various errors of foreshortening, perspective, and anatomy. Even compared to early Sandman or other books of the era, The Invisibles still seemed primitive. Perhaps the artists were as rushed as Morrison seems to have been; every other issue talks about some stress-related health problem. I did feel somewhat bad for the man, especially after reading some of the drivel in the letters page of people who genuinely didn't understand what he was getting at. Unfortunately, even though I did have some comprehension of what he was getting at, it only helped me to see that he wasn't achieving it. My Suggested Readings in Comics

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    This is the first volume of what many consider to be a classic series. The first half focuses on a young Jack Frost, a problem teenager, who is initiated into the Invisibles and thus gives the reader a look into this fantastic world. Jack goes to a boarding school that turns out to be a lot more and picks up a homeless mentor who teaches him about other worlds and the possibility of visiting them. The second part is about the Invisibles using a time travel ritual to visit and hire the Marquis de This is the first volume of what many consider to be a classic series. The first half focuses on a young Jack Frost, a problem teenager, who is initiated into the Invisibles and thus gives the reader a look into this fantastic world. Jack goes to a boarding school that turns out to be a lot more and picks up a homeless mentor who teaches him about other worlds and the possibility of visiting them. The second part is about the Invisibles using a time travel ritual to visit and hire the Marquis de Sade whose warped views creates a nightmare world that the characters have to experience and escape from to get back to their own time. Meanwhile, an assassin in real time is looking for the group and you can guess what happens. To some readers the latter half of this novel will seem confusing as the creators make references to all types of themes and subjects (though these are mentioned to a lesser extent in the first half, too): Aztec Mythology, Gnosticism, 80s pop culture references, alien abductions, emotional control, Biblical tales and characters, Byron, Shakespeare, BDSM and so much more. It is definitely not intended for young readers and might very well fall into "R" rated zone. That said, it's considered one of the classics and was said to have shaken up a stagnant period for comics/graphic novels. BBC started a TV series but it never saw the light of day. This series may have very well influenced movies like THE MATRIX and other such types. ARTWORK: B minus; STORY/PLOTTING: B to B plus; CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B to B plus; THEMES/INNOVATION: A minus; WHEN READ: January 2012; OVERALL GRADE: B plus.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    "I'm one holy fucking terror." I went into this expecting a superhero comic and got psychic warfare and psychedelic anarchy instead. Morrison at his most experimental and ambitious. "There's a palace in your head, boy. Learn to live in it always." "I'm one holy fucking terror." I went into this expecting a superhero comic and got psychic warfare and psychedelic anarchy instead. Morrison at his most experimental and ambitious. "There's a palace in your head, boy. Learn to live in it always."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I know, I know, I’m late to the party on this one! The first volume of The Invisibles came out 20 years ago and I’m just now getting around to reading it – all I can say is: Batman. But anyway, I’m here now and glad to have finally read such a talked-about book and discovering that it’s really good! The first Invisibles book introduces us to our hero Dane McGowan, an angry working class teenager from Liverpool who spends his evenings vandalising property while his single mother entertains her la I know, I know, I’m late to the party on this one! The first volume of The Invisibles came out 20 years ago and I’m just now getting around to reading it – all I can say is: Batman. But anyway, I’m here now and glad to have finally read such a talked-about book and discovering that it’s really good! The first Invisibles book introduces us to our hero Dane McGowan, an angry working class teenager from Liverpool who spends his evenings vandalising property while his single mother entertains her latest boyfriend in their council flat. After an attempt at burning down his school, he’s sent to a re-education centre called Harmony House, a nightmarish facility which tries to reprogram Dane’s nonconformist behaviour through lobotomy and castration. That is until he’s rescued by King Mob, the leader of a group of magicians called The Invisibles, who inducts him into his ragtag team of rebels and tells him about their secret war against The Outer Church. Usually with books you can look at the many elements that influenced it and say that this part is inspired by this and this other part is inspired by that and so on; with The Invisibles Volume 1, a comic that came out in the early 90s, you can do the opposite. There are numerous scenes that would be used a few years later in the 1999 film The Matrix and the general spirit of the book - nihilistic anarchy and anti-consumerist - could be seen as the foundation of another highly influential 1999 film, Fight Club. As Morrison himself has said, a really good piece of art captures a mood, and The Invisibles captures the mood of the end of the 20th century – the fight for individuality, the value of identity, and the anticipation and desire of a new century bringing about a new world. In some ways, considering the time, The Invisibles could be a reaction to the excessive consumerism of the 80s, being the search for substance and meaning and casting aside the superficial dross that makes up modern society; looked at another way, it’s a great story – either way, it’s undeniably a really good piece of art! One thing that struck me the most about this book is its massive impact it must’ve had on the Wachowskis when they were coming up with The Matrix. Dane is basically Neo, whose antisocial behaviour brings him to the attention of King Mob (Morpheus) and The Outer Church (the Agents of the Matrix). He’s given the choice of enlightenment from King Mob, of discovering the real world, or becoming another drone. King Mob sees in Dane the potential of someone powerful, someone who can greatly help their fight against The Outer Church. Later on, he’s told to open his mind by leaping off of a building – sound familiar? Then there’s the astral projection scene where their bodies stay in one place while their spirits go elsewhere, like plugging in to the Matrix. The Invisibles’ influence goes beyond The Matrix though. Dane is rescued from the Harmony House authoritarian monsters by King Mob, a scene that would be replicated in China Mieville’s first novel, King Rat. The Harmony House terrors look like Charles Burns’ creations from X’Ed Out and The Hive, matching the tone of surreal paranoia as well. But The Invisibles also incorporates a lot of popular elements into its story too. Dane’s abandoned on the streets of London by King Mob but is soon picked up by a seemingly raving mad homeless man called Tom O’Bedlam, the Obi-Wan to Dane’s Luke, who teaches him about the true reality. There are also some brilliant historical scenes like a young John Lennon and Stu Sutcliffe talking about Stu leaving the band, just before The Beatles became big; Lord Byron and Percy Shelley discussing their work and its purpose; and an entire storyline set during the French Revolution, all of which wouldn’t be out of place in Gaiman’s Sandman comics. It wouldn’t be an influential comic if it weren’t a fun read and it absolutely is. The story starts off normally, albeit disturbingly, with Dane’s troubling life and slowly becomes weirder with Dane watching Lennon/Sutcliffe’s ghosts, to going to the nightmarish Harmony House, to meeting King Mob, it’s built up masterfully so that the reader becomes more and more interested in what the comic is and where it’s headed. The comic is sprinkled throughout with wonderful characters like Tom O’Bedlam, the murderous fox-hunting toffs, and of course the rest of the Invisibles. It’s a comic that would go on to cement Morrison’s reputation for abstract, crazy comics, especially those scenes where Dane goes for a bike ride and apropos of nothing, sees a planet hovering above him, and the many references to sigils and chaos magik that Morrison himself practices. That said, it’s much more accessible than you think and though it’s a wild ride, it’s totally understandable (for the most part!). But this idea of whacky Morrison stories is a bit too dismissive. Critics of Morrison’s work might say a book like The Invisibles talks a big game about big ideas and big plans for humanity and society but it doesn’t really offer anything substantial – it’s pseudo-intellectual at its core. To which I say its inspiring message of instilling in the reader a belief in change, of unrealised and boundless potential in everyone, an unrelenting, sometimes euphoric, hope is real. Whatever things Morrison talks about in The Invisibles, mixing in spiritualism and magik, philosophy and art, the impression it leaves on the reader is undeniable and real. That’s the power of this book – not necessarily of specific ideas ( that we’ve heard before thanks to its proliferation through other works of art), but of the idea of the idea, is a remarkably powerful one. It urges you think about yourself and your world around you and through this direction lies its meaning. It sounds new-agey and as intellectually flimsy as a self-help book, but it’s far more complex as no self-help book is ever this engrossing or clever. There is something real here and its power on the reader and the culture at large is proof of that. The reason it’s not a full five perfect read is that I felt the French Revolution story arc and the Tom O’Bedlam speechifying went on a bit too long. They were fine in themselves but felt a little stretched. A small issue but there it is. The first volume of The Invisibles is a fast-paced fantasy thriller with a cast of eccentric, colourful characters with a story that spans space and time coated with layers and layers of mysterious sub-story. It’s exciting and enjoyable, fun and funny, and frequently tickles the brain as you’re reading it in a way few comics do. It’s as fresh as it must’ve seemed 20 years ago brimming with energy and hope – I really liked it and look forward to the rest of the series! If you’re a Morrison fan and you haven’t read it, definitely check it out today.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Grant Morrison has said that he wrote The Invisibles as part of a magic ritual, and also that aliens told him part of the plot. Really. The Invisibles ends up being pretty much exactly what you'd expect, given that background. Let me also add that there's a great deal of ultra-paranoid conspiracy theory culture as well as the expected psychedelic gods and astral time travel and such. As for the plot... Well, there's an ill-defined secret conspiracy to rob humanity of free will and The Invisibles Grant Morrison has said that he wrote The Invisibles as part of a magic ritual, and also that aliens told him part of the plot. Really. The Invisibles ends up being pretty much exactly what you'd expect, given that background. Let me also add that there's a great deal of ultra-paranoid conspiracy theory culture as well as the expected psychedelic gods and astral time travel and such. As for the plot... Well, there's an ill-defined secret conspiracy to rob humanity of free will and The Invisibles are trying to stop them. Somehow. Think Assassins Creed, with far less defined threats and goals.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Callie *Fights Censorship*

    1 1/2 Stars I imagine Morrison sitting in a candlelit room flourishing a quill as he wrote this pretentious babble. Dude, get over yourself. In the end I gave up, I just couldn't. That's right, I was so bored that I couldn't even bring myself to read the final 3 pages. It seemed to me that Morrison was just throwing everything he could at it and calling it philosophy. To me a good gage of the quality of a comic is in the picture to word ratio. If you aren't relying on the artwork to move the story 1 1/2 Stars I imagine Morrison sitting in a candlelit room flourishing a quill as he wrote this pretentious babble. Dude, get over yourself. In the end I gave up, I just couldn't. That's right, I was so bored that I couldn't even bring myself to read the final 3 pages. It seemed to me that Morrison was just throwing everything he could at it and calling it philosophy. To me a good gage of the quality of a comic is in the picture to word ratio. If you aren't relying on the artwork to move the story then you aren't using the proper medium, write a novel. Sure this comic did have a number of interesting and striking visuals, but it also had way way way too many panels depicting a person standing and talking, sometimes sitting and talking. Oh the talking....characters just droned on and on and on. If you have to constantly write philosophical monologues designed to beat the story's theme into your readers brain....you're doing it wrong. Overall, I could not connect with this story or any of the characters. There was nothing genuine or organic about this story, I just felt like I was being force fed angst anarchist shite. Plus it absolutely reeked of the 90's oh-I'm-so-anti-establishment-and-grungy-and-alternative.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    This graphic novel is a spicy gumbo of astounding influences. Listing just a few: Illuminatus!, brain machines, psychedelics, chaos magick, conspiracy theory, mind control, The Prisoner, Michael Moorcock's The Cornelius Chronicles, material gnosticism, Dada, Situationism, violence/ ahimsa, time travel, secret societies... Author Grant Morrison never disappoints and serves as a reminder that much of the most advanced fiction of our times is turning up in comic books. Like Robert Anton Wilson befo This graphic novel is a spicy gumbo of astounding influences. Listing just a few: Illuminatus!, brain machines, psychedelics, chaos magick, conspiracy theory, mind control, The Prisoner, Michael Moorcock's The Cornelius Chronicles, material gnosticism, Dada, Situationism, violence/ ahimsa, time travel, secret societies... Author Grant Morrison never disappoints and serves as a reminder that much of the most advanced fiction of our times is turning up in comic books. Like Robert Anton Wilson before him, Morrison popularizes difficult concepts and serves them up in a tastily entertaining fashion. Life changing.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    This was a lot of fun. It reminded me of early Hellblazer except it doesn't take itself quite as seriously. If you don't know much about Grant Morrison, I would suggest doing a bit of homework before diving into this, as it deals with (and is a product of) some occult concepts important to Morrison. Knowing about this beforehand really helped me enjoy and understand it a bit more than I would have otherwise. I suggest checking out his disinfo.con lecture (which is what made me want to read this This was a lot of fun. It reminded me of early Hellblazer except it doesn't take itself quite as seriously. If you don't know much about Grant Morrison, I would suggest doing a bit of homework before diving into this, as it deals with (and is a product of) some occult concepts important to Morrison. Knowing about this beforehand really helped me enjoy and understand it a bit more than I would have otherwise. I suggest checking out his disinfo.con lecture (which is what made me want to read this in the first place) or his documentary Talking with the Gods.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    Yeah, okay. As fellow reviewer William Thomas points out, the book suffers because of the art. Steve Yeowell & Jill Thompson, respectively illustrating the first and second arcs, don't exactly make the book stand out. I liked Yeowell's output better than Thompson's, though. Story-wise, I'm aware [1] of the phenomenon that "The Invisibles" has become, [2] that it probably picks up in pace and what-not in subsequent volumes, and that [3] what I'm reading will most likely make more sense later - if Yeah, okay. As fellow reviewer William Thomas points out, the book suffers because of the art. Steve Yeowell & Jill Thompson, respectively illustrating the first and second arcs, don't exactly make the book stand out. I liked Yeowell's output better than Thompson's, though. Story-wise, I'm aware [1] of the phenomenon that "The Invisibles" has become, [2] that it probably picks up in pace and what-not in subsequent volumes, and that [3] what I'm reading will most likely make more sense later - if not, I'm sure a second reading would clear things up, but at the same time I figure that the series cannot possibly be that dense, or else it would not be what it is/has become (reputation-wise). Anyway. I've got the whole The Invisibles omnibus to go through, so I will be reading the next volumes, but unless things pick up a little bit, I'll most likely be reading it a chapter (an issue) here & there, in between other books.

  11. 4 out of 5

    John

    Should be called, "Ohhhh my! Aren't we alternative!?!" Should be called, "Ohhhh my! Aren't we alternative!?!"

  12. 4 out of 5

    Printable Tire

    It's funny, but everything I liked and didn't like about the Doom Patrol book I read is everything I don't like and like about this book. Whereas I reveled in the "dada" aspect of the Doom Patrol, and was disappointed when all the nonsense began to have a pat logic to it, this book's nonsense struck me as too much free posturing, and I wanted desperately for some semblance of plot to exist to grab my attention on. There is something to be said about Aristotle's old bit about a story needing a be It's funny, but everything I liked and didn't like about the Doom Patrol book I read is everything I don't like and like about this book. Whereas I reveled in the "dada" aspect of the Doom Patrol, and was disappointed when all the nonsense began to have a pat logic to it, this book's nonsense struck me as too much free posturing, and I wanted desperately for some semblance of plot to exist to grab my attention on. There is something to be said about Aristotle's old bit about a story needing a beginning, middle, and end, even in the most experimental of forms. This book began too far in the middle, and while I appreciate the riskiness of this maneuver, it caused the best to follow to formulate in my mind as free-jazz sludge. I couldn't get very interested in a world where I didn't know the parameters, what rules and laws it was to follow; everything weighed in at the same value, and thus nothing was of any value. I think I can see what Morrison is doing here, creating a story as loosely structured as the world his motley crew is trying to dream into existence, but if anything this failed experiment shows how trite and 20th century and 90's such undeveloped millennial radicalism is. It leads to some fun, and vicarious thrills and mental spills, but does not feed the head, nor the body or the spirit. But I suppose I would read more in this series if the trade paperbacks were to appear mysteriously in my room some day, just as I might watch the X-Files every now and then.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I realized today that I've never actually reviewed this book. I thought about reviewing it. Then I realized that I hate this book so much I can't even write about it. So: I hate this book. I hate, hate, hate this book. I hate it. I realized today that I've never actually reviewed this book. I thought about reviewing it. Then I realized that I hate this book so much I can't even write about it. So: I hate this book. I hate, hate, hate this book. I hate it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Grant Morrison wants desperately to be Alan Moore, only hipper. The only problem is he doesn't have one tenth the talent or intelligence Moore has. So he writes boring, sophomoric drivel meant to show off his encyclopedic knowledge of counter-cultural esoterica but which in fact only demonstrates that he either didn't really pay attention to any of his source material, or he was just too thick to 'get it.' The art is ugly and the writing is crap. Sprawling in its scope yet conceptually shallow. Grant Morrison wants desperately to be Alan Moore, only hipper. The only problem is he doesn't have one tenth the talent or intelligence Moore has. So he writes boring, sophomoric drivel meant to show off his encyclopedic knowledge of counter-cultural esoterica but which in fact only demonstrates that he either didn't really pay attention to any of his source material, or he was just too thick to 'get it.' The art is ugly and the writing is crap. Sprawling in its scope yet conceptually shallow. Radical-chic of the highest (lowest?) order. And let's not forget the nauseatingly blatant Mary Sue character of King Mob. What kind of narcissistic phony anarchist poseur makes themselves the charismatic superhero leader of their own fictional revolutionary cell? Puke-o-rama.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dregj

    Lots of conspiracy theories thrown together for the hell of it.and none of it making a damn bit of sense.I found it all wildly inconsistent,boring and nothing in it at all made me want to read on except my own will power. I am amazed this desperately hard to read tat gets such good reviews yes its very different ,but it's not very good at all. Lots of conspiracy theories thrown together for the hell of it.and none of it making a damn bit of sense.I found it all wildly inconsistent,boring and nothing in it at all made me want to read on except my own will power. I am amazed this desperately hard to read tat gets such good reviews yes its very different ,but it's not very good at all.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    That made only the slightest bit of sense.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Werner

    Morrison's a fucking spaz. Is it too boneheaded to ask for a bit more action? He always has to have his characters--none of which I particularly care about--ramble on with long speeches that rope in historical perspective and introductory philosophy and grand-yet-hollow ideas for no real reason. I often like where The Invisibles goes once it gets going. There are parts that are perfectly odd, and when Morrison can streamline a scene--usually with action instead of piles and piles of information-- Morrison's a fucking spaz. Is it too boneheaded to ask for a bit more action? He always has to have his characters--none of which I particularly care about--ramble on with long speeches that rope in historical perspective and introductory philosophy and grand-yet-hollow ideas for no real reason. I often like where The Invisibles goes once it gets going. There are parts that are perfectly odd, and when Morrison can streamline a scene--usually with action instead of piles and piles of information--the story seems to be worth following. While I like where he goes, where he comes from is what demotivates me. The Invisibles doesn't seem like it's reaching for anything. I get that there are references to the end of the world and Jack Frost is embarking on a hero's journey for whatever his role in the end of the world may be, but it feels like an empty narrative even this early in the game. Plus, I fucking hate time travel. This "spiritual imprint" version of it wasn't overly offensive, but I didn't think about it too hard because I was conserving energy for the next time a shadowy being gave a longwinded speech. I'm not going to continue reading this series. Morrison is creative, but his creativity isn't pointing at much aside from ideas about sophomoric anarchy and a quasi-intelligent acid trip ramble about perceived reality vs reality reality.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Mishap

    The first two thirds of this were arresting, but then it quickly irked me once time travel and the Marqui de Sade were involved. A teenage trouble-making thug is sent to a reform school where parts of their brains and their testicles are removed, but he's saved by an Invisible and inducted into their cell after a long education on the streets with Tom Bedlam. See, there's a war on between the beings who want to rule the earth, the Invisibles, and the earth itself who wants humanity to move onto t The first two thirds of this were arresting, but then it quickly irked me once time travel and the Marqui de Sade were involved. A teenage trouble-making thug is sent to a reform school where parts of their brains and their testicles are removed, but he's saved by an Invisible and inducted into their cell after a long education on the streets with Tom Bedlam. See, there's a war on between the beings who want to rule the earth, the Invisibles, and the earth itself who wants humanity to move onto the next phase of existence and get off the planet. Yeah, and Lennon is a godhead (literally) oracle with psychedelic colors. It is weird, violent, awesome for awhile, and quite difficult to follow as some of the transitions are blunt and confusing. The influence of The Watchmen and Sandman is evident, but not quite as involved as those (and not nearly as good as Sandman). Sigh, de Sade. The mistake is always made to conflate his work with rebellion against repression, showing authority up for the nasty hypocrites they are. I think he's just the other side of the coin of violent authority, though: a reflection not a transgression.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Derrick

    Picked this one up at the LCS because of all the discussion surrounding the Omnibus release. I figured it was time to sample it. I don't think I like it. I really struggled at first because Dane is so unlikable -- I just don't identify with that kind of rebellion. (I can see where he would speak to a lot of kids, though, especially back in the 90's.) Then I liked it with Mad Tom playing the Merlin/Wart, Way of the Peaceful Warrior Socrates, etc character for Dane. And then Arcadia felt pretentio Picked this one up at the LCS because of all the discussion surrounding the Omnibus release. I figured it was time to sample it. I don't think I like it. I really struggled at first because Dane is so unlikable -- I just don't identify with that kind of rebellion. (I can see where he would speak to a lot of kids, though, especially back in the 90's.) Then I liked it with Mad Tom playing the Merlin/Wart, Way of the Peaceful Warrior Socrates, etc character for Dane. And then Arcadia felt pretentious and confusing and a bit "shocking for shock's sake"-- especially the de Sade castle scenes. It just climbs right up its own ass, and comics folks whose opinions I trust assure me it just gets weirder from here. Add in inconsistent and sloppy artwork, and you've got a recipe for skippage. I fear that I may be too old for it. Or perhaps lazy, always running back to my Big Two superheroes comfort zone? Or maybe it's just not for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    This is a book that is British punk angry revolutionary political with sci fi and history and DeSade and the Beatles and by Grant Morrison... okay art, pseudo-psychedlelic to resurrect the sixties.... I dunno. Inner/outer revolution, sexual, musical.... but I didn't really get into it. So today, in early January, I just read Sam Quixote's fine review of this book and have been influenced by my friend Matt Williamson to reconsider it, and to go deeper into it, since it gets better, and my wife's f This is a book that is British punk angry revolutionary political with sci fi and history and DeSade and the Beatles and by Grant Morrison... okay art, pseudo-psychedlelic to resurrect the sixties.... I dunno. Inner/outer revolution, sexual, musical.... but I didn't really get into it. So today, in early January, I just read Sam Quixote's fine review of this book and have been influenced by my friend Matt Williamson to reconsider it, and to go deeper into it, since it gets better, and my wife's favorite movie of all time is The Matrix, so I am recommending it to her and will read it, darn it. Have not been a Morrison fan, really. But I will try it again…. thanks to SQ.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    I actually enjoyed this more than I thought. I gave it a good reading session over two nights and read the whole Vol 1. I must admit, there is some 'weird as' and 'wtf' shit in there, at times, especially as I got tired I had no friggin idea about what was going on. But for a chill out comic session. It was better than I was expecting and that is a good result. I actually enjoyed this more than I thought. I gave it a good reading session over two nights and read the whole Vol 1. I must admit, there is some 'weird as' and 'wtf' shit in there, at times, especially as I got tired I had no friggin idea about what was going on. But for a chill out comic session. It was better than I was expecting and that is a good result.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Javier Muñoz

    Es difícil describir esta colección a alguien que no ha leido nada de Morrison, es una colección que no nos lleva por un camino prefijado para que lleguemos a un final en el que todo cuadra, los invisibles te tiene que absorver, te tienes que zambullir en ella para buscar lo que significa para tí. Digamos para resumir que es un viaje lisérgico en busca de la libertad y la verdad que nos niegan aquellos que ejercen el poder, pero por el camino nos encontraremos muchas historias increibles, de nos Es difícil describir esta colección a alguien que no ha leido nada de Morrison, es una colección que no nos lleva por un camino prefijado para que lleguemos a un final en el que todo cuadra, los invisibles te tiene que absorver, te tienes que zambullir en ella para buscar lo que significa para tí. Digamos para resumir que es un viaje lisérgico en busca de la libertad y la verdad que nos niegan aquellos que ejercen el poder, pero por el camino nos encontraremos muchas historias increibles, de nosotros depende elegir cómo interpretar las metáforas y hasta qué punto nos parece que Morrison está acertado en sus planteamientos o si simplemente tuvo un mal viaje y se limitó a poner todo lo que se le fue ocurriendo en el papel. Se dice que los hermanos wachoski tomaron muchas cosas de los invisibles para hacer matrix, aunque desde luego, no fueron tan atrevidos como Morrison. "Originalmente, las culturas humanas eran homeostáticas. Existían en un equilibrio autosostenible. Sin las nociones de tiempo y progreso que tenemos ahora. Entonces, llegó el virus de la ciudad. Nadie sabe con certeza de dónde vino o quién nos lo trajo pero, como todos los organismos virales, su directiva principal es usar todos los recursos disponibles para producir copias de sí mismo. Más y más copias hasta que ya no queda materia prima y el cuerpo del huésped, abrumado, solo puede morir. Las ciudades quieren que nos convirtamos en buenos constructores. Con el tiempo, construiremos cohetes y llevaremos el virus a otros mundos" Este primer tomo contiene los dos primeros arcos argumentales de la colección: en "sin blanca en el cielo y el infierno" se nos cuentan los primeros pasos de la historia de Dean McGowan un joven conflictivo que es internado en un centro de menores muy siniestro, de ahí lo rescata King Mob, uno de los invisibles (un grupo clandestino que participa en la guerra secreta entre el orden y el caos), que quiere reclutarle para su grupo, en principio Dane no querrá saber nada del tema, pero después se encontrará con Tom el Loco, un mendigo que le empezará a abrir los ojos a cómo es realmente el mundo; en "Arcadia" Dane (que ha cambiado su nombre por Jack Frost) viaja en el tiempo con King Mob y su grupo, para conseguir una forma de luchar contra un temible enemigo.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zane

    I picked these first 8 issues up on ebay for a measly $4.00. Best 4 dollars I've spent in a long time. The cast of characters is weird: the Marquis de Sade, Mary Shelley, The head of John the Baptist, a Mexican tranny witch, Lord Byron, etc. Immediately, the work and art is really 90's, which is a bit offsetting, because it seems to need a futuristic feel for the story to function. The invisibles are unveiling the present as it is to fight for a future that should have been here by now. By the t I picked these first 8 issues up on ebay for a measly $4.00. Best 4 dollars I've spent in a long time. The cast of characters is weird: the Marquis de Sade, Mary Shelley, The head of John the Baptist, a Mexican tranny witch, Lord Byron, etc. Immediately, the work and art is really 90's, which is a bit offsetting, because it seems to need a futuristic feel for the story to function. The invisibles are unveiling the present as it is to fight for a future that should have been here by now. By the third issue you forget the 90's, however, and suspend disbelief. Overall, the writing and art hold up quite well. The only warning I would give is, don't read or watch interviews with Grant Morrison, because he actually believes what he was writing is materially true, not myth or metaphor. If you read this work from the perspective that it is collecting radical thought over the centuries and weaving it together through a weird superhero narrative, however, it is delightful.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Otherwyrld

    I knew I was going to have a tough time with this book when one of the first acts by our young protagonist is to burn down the school library. This act is followed up by setting fire to the school and giving the one teacher who wanted to help him a good kick in the head. The book settles down a bit after that, and it helped to read it through a second time. Certainly, once you get through the training montage and into the real action it picks up quite a lot. I'm not sure that I'm on board with t I knew I was going to have a tough time with this book when one of the first acts by our young protagonist is to burn down the school library. This act is followed up by setting fire to the school and giving the one teacher who wanted to help him a good kick in the head. The book settles down a bit after that, and it helped to read it through a second time. Certainly, once you get through the training montage and into the real action it picks up quite a lot. I'm not sure that I'm on board with this story and with the motives of The Invisibles, but this was a good enough start to keep me reading.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    There is some creeepy stuff in this comic; those tally-ho hunter guys with the dark glasses, and what about that unfleshed Aztec god? Should not have read about him right before bed. That said, I'm not sure if I'll get into this series or not. It has some compelling plot elements but I don't really like any of the characters, especially the forever whinging Dane. There is some creeepy stuff in this comic; those tally-ho hunter guys with the dark glasses, and what about that unfleshed Aztec god? Should not have read about him right before bed. That said, I'm not sure if I'll get into this series or not. It has some compelling plot elements but I don't really like any of the characters, especially the forever whinging Dane.

  26. 5 out of 5

    MIke

    I'll write this review for all volumes. "The Invisibles" is 1960's psychedelia wrapped in modern clothing and wrung through every magickal wringer Grant Morrison could reach. Aliens that may or may not be, conspiracies that loop around themselves and the New Buddha in the body of a foul-mouthed Liverpudian boy named Dane. It's a tale of Us vs. Them that eats itself like orobouros. I'll write this review for all volumes. "The Invisibles" is 1960's psychedelia wrapped in modern clothing and wrung through every magickal wringer Grant Morrison could reach. Aliens that may or may not be, conspiracies that loop around themselves and the New Buddha in the body of a foul-mouthed Liverpudian boy named Dane. It's a tale of Us vs. Them that eats itself like orobouros.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie G.

    Finally reading this series and I am hooked! I found the bum who takes Jack Frost under his wings tiring and I hated all his verbosity - but then again as a woman I have guys spouting crap at me all the time thinking they have the right for me to listen :(

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Pedersen

    Drivel. I can't begin to fathom how drugged one has to be to create this, but it's nonsensical, convoluted, poorly drawn and so boring it should be marketed as sleep medicine. It comes across as a stoned fanboy trying to write Alan Moore fan fiction. No, I will not buy volume two. Drivel. I can't begin to fathom how drugged one has to be to create this, but it's nonsensical, convoluted, poorly drawn and so boring it should be marketed as sleep medicine. It comes across as a stoned fanboy trying to write Alan Moore fan fiction. No, I will not buy volume two.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heleen

    Interesting ideas, but a bit too much at once.

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