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Moby Dick (Annotated) Study Guide and Aid

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* Study Guide This is a 83 Page breakdown of Herman Melville's "Moby Dick". This study aid gives detail summaries and analysis of each chapter as well the understanding. This includes plots, character analysis, themes, symbols, quotations, and key facts from the work. Please enjoy Example of Summary from Chapter 1 The narrative of Moby-Dick begins with the famous brief sente * Study Guide This is a 83 Page breakdown of Herman Melville's "Moby Dick". This study aid gives detail summaries and analysis of each chapter as well the understanding. This includes plots, character analysis, themes, symbols, quotations, and key facts from the work. Please enjoy Example of Summary from Chapter 1 The narrative of Moby-Dick begins with the famous brief sentence, “Call me Ishmael.” Ishmael, a sailor, describes a typical scene in New York City, with large groups of men gathering on their days off to contemplate the ocean and dream of a life at sea. He explains that he himself went to sea because, like these men, he was feeling a “damp, drizzly November in [his] soul” and craved adventure. Shunning anything too “respectable” (or expensive), he always ships as a common sailor rather than as a passenger. Ishmael travels from New York to New Bedford, Massachusetts, the whaling capital of the United States. He arrives too late to catch the ferry to Nantucket, the original whaling center of New England; for the sake of tradition, Ishmael wants to sail in a Nantucket whaler. For now, however, he has to spend a few nights in New Bedford. He roams the streets looking for an inn, but those that he finds seem too expensive. He stumbles into, then quickly out of, a church full of wailing and weeping African Americans, where a sermon is being preached on “the blackness of darkness.” Ishmael finally wanders into the Spouter-Inn, owned by Peter Coffin. The ominous name of the inn and the owner satisfy his mood, and the place is dilapidated and sure to be cheap.


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* Study Guide This is a 83 Page breakdown of Herman Melville's "Moby Dick". This study aid gives detail summaries and analysis of each chapter as well the understanding. This includes plots, character analysis, themes, symbols, quotations, and key facts from the work. Please enjoy Example of Summary from Chapter 1 The narrative of Moby-Dick begins with the famous brief sente * Study Guide This is a 83 Page breakdown of Herman Melville's "Moby Dick". This study aid gives detail summaries and analysis of each chapter as well the understanding. This includes plots, character analysis, themes, symbols, quotations, and key facts from the work. Please enjoy Example of Summary from Chapter 1 The narrative of Moby-Dick begins with the famous brief sentence, “Call me Ishmael.” Ishmael, a sailor, describes a typical scene in New York City, with large groups of men gathering on their days off to contemplate the ocean and dream of a life at sea. He explains that he himself went to sea because, like these men, he was feeling a “damp, drizzly November in [his] soul” and craved adventure. Shunning anything too “respectable” (or expensive), he always ships as a common sailor rather than as a passenger. Ishmael travels from New York to New Bedford, Massachusetts, the whaling capital of the United States. He arrives too late to catch the ferry to Nantucket, the original whaling center of New England; for the sake of tradition, Ishmael wants to sail in a Nantucket whaler. For now, however, he has to spend a few nights in New Bedford. He roams the streets looking for an inn, but those that he finds seem too expensive. He stumbles into, then quickly out of, a church full of wailing and weeping African Americans, where a sermon is being preached on “the blackness of darkness.” Ishmael finally wanders into the Spouter-Inn, owned by Peter Coffin. The ominous name of the inn and the owner satisfy his mood, and the place is dilapidated and sure to be cheap.

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