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A Postmodern Cinema: The Voice of the Other in Canadian Film is both an informative description of postmodern and poststructuralist theory and an enlightening illustration of how Canadian filmmakers have used postmodern and poststructuralist cinematic technique in Canadian film. The book explores four films, Atom Egoyan's Family Viewing, Denys Aracand's Jesus of Montreal, A Postmodern Cinema: The Voice of the Other in Canadian Film is both an informative description of postmodern and poststructuralist theory and an enlightening illustration of how Canadian filmmakers have used postmodern and poststructuralist cinematic technique in Canadian film. The book explores four films, Atom Egoyan's Family Viewing, Denys Aracand's Jesus of Montreal, Patricia Rozema's I've Heard the Mermaids Singing, and Bill MacGillivray's Life Classes. Using Canadian culture as an example of a marginalized culture, each film illustrates a different aspect of the marginalized experience. This book proposes a new scheme for a poststructuralist film theory. The author deals with the transition from modernism to postmodernism in literature and film and focuses on the relationship of Canadian film history to the formation of a Canadian identity.


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A Postmodern Cinema: The Voice of the Other in Canadian Film is both an informative description of postmodern and poststructuralist theory and an enlightening illustration of how Canadian filmmakers have used postmodern and poststructuralist cinematic technique in Canadian film. The book explores four films, Atom Egoyan's Family Viewing, Denys Aracand's Jesus of Montreal, A Postmodern Cinema: The Voice of the Other in Canadian Film is both an informative description of postmodern and poststructuralist theory and an enlightening illustration of how Canadian filmmakers have used postmodern and poststructuralist cinematic technique in Canadian film. The book explores four films, Atom Egoyan's Family Viewing, Denys Aracand's Jesus of Montreal, Patricia Rozema's I've Heard the Mermaids Singing, and Bill MacGillivray's Life Classes. Using Canadian culture as an example of a marginalized culture, each film illustrates a different aspect of the marginalized experience. This book proposes a new scheme for a poststructuralist film theory. The author deals with the transition from modernism to postmodernism in literature and film and focuses on the relationship of Canadian film history to the formation of a Canadian identity.

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