web site hit counter Plenty of Time When We Get Home: Love and Recovery in the Aftermath of War - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Plenty of Time When We Get Home: Love and Recovery in the Aftermath of War

Availability: Ready to download

Brian, on his way back to base after mid-tour leave, was wounded by a roadside bomb that sent shrapnel through his brain. Kayla waited anxiously for news and, on returning home, sought out Brian. The two began a tentative romance and later married, but neither anticipated the consequences of Brian’s injury on their lives. Lacking essential support for returning veterans fr Brian, on his way back to base after mid-tour leave, was wounded by a roadside bomb that sent shrapnel through his brain. Kayla waited anxiously for news and, on returning home, sought out Brian. The two began a tentative romance and later married, but neither anticipated the consequences of Brian’s injury on their lives. Lacking essential support for returning veterans from the military and the VA, Kayla and Brian suffered through posttraumatic stress amplified by his violent mood swings, her struggles to reintegrate into a country still oblivious to women veterans, and what seemed the callous, consumerist indifference of civilian society at large. Kayla persevered. So did Brian. They fought for their marriage, drawing on remarkable reservoirs of courage and commitment. They confronted their demons head-on, impatient with phoniness of any sort. Inspired by an unwavering ethos of service, they continued to stand on common ground. Finally, they found their own paths to healing and wholeness, both as individuals and as a family, in dedication to a larger community.


Compare

Brian, on his way back to base after mid-tour leave, was wounded by a roadside bomb that sent shrapnel through his brain. Kayla waited anxiously for news and, on returning home, sought out Brian. The two began a tentative romance and later married, but neither anticipated the consequences of Brian’s injury on their lives. Lacking essential support for returning veterans fr Brian, on his way back to base after mid-tour leave, was wounded by a roadside bomb that sent shrapnel through his brain. Kayla waited anxiously for news and, on returning home, sought out Brian. The two began a tentative romance and later married, but neither anticipated the consequences of Brian’s injury on their lives. Lacking essential support for returning veterans from the military and the VA, Kayla and Brian suffered through posttraumatic stress amplified by his violent mood swings, her struggles to reintegrate into a country still oblivious to women veterans, and what seemed the callous, consumerist indifference of civilian society at large. Kayla persevered. So did Brian. They fought for their marriage, drawing on remarkable reservoirs of courage and commitment. They confronted their demons head-on, impatient with phoniness of any sort. Inspired by an unwavering ethos of service, they continued to stand on common ground. Finally, they found their own paths to healing and wholeness, both as individuals and as a family, in dedication to a larger community.

30 review for Plenty of Time When We Get Home: Love and Recovery in the Aftermath of War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bridgette Ralph

    I think everyone should read this book. It will help non military people better understand what our military has gone through in war. They see the world in a completely different way than we do. It gives the civilian a better appreciation of the sacrifice that our military makes. This memoir is far from boring.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    This is a great book that gives you insight as to what many of our military heroes experience upon return from a combat experience. I recommend to everyone for a greater appreciation.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexa

    I heard an interview with the author on NPR and I think I got more from that than the book itself. Nevertheless, compelling story.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    **I won this book free good reads first reads and I must say it was amazing! Powerful book detailing the trials and tribulations our troops face post war. I could relate to the book because I have multiple family members in the military. A real eye-opening read and I would recommend everyone read it to get a sense of the difficulties our troops face when coming home from war, especially female troops who are often overlooked and are held to greater expectations. Thanks to the author for a reveali **I won this book free good reads first reads and I must say it was amazing! Powerful book detailing the trials and tribulations our troops face post war. I could relate to the book because I have multiple family members in the military. A real eye-opening read and I would recommend everyone read it to get a sense of the difficulties our troops face when coming home from war, especially female troops who are often overlooked and are held to greater expectations. Thanks to the author for a revealing look at life post war for military families.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Caylee

    Brian and Kayla meet in Afghanistan in an Army mission and enjoy each others company. They go their separate ways, but shortly after Brian gets hit with a piece of shrapnel in the head while on a bus in Iraq and sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI). When Kayla returns home from Iraq, she goes on as many dates with Brian as she can before she's deployed again and they grow close. They stay in contact, but it was clear that Brian will never be able to serve again because of his injury. Whenever Brian and Kayla meet in Afghanistan in an Army mission and enjoy each others company. They go their separate ways, but shortly after Brian gets hit with a piece of shrapnel in the head while on a bus in Iraq and sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI). When Kayla returns home from Iraq, she goes on as many dates with Brian as she can before she's deployed again and they grow close. They stay in contact, but it was clear that Brian will never be able to serve again because of his injury. Whenever Kayla is home, their bond grows but as it does Kayla realizes that he isn't completely normal after his injury and needs more help than the Army is giving him. He can't remember appointment times, isn't paying any of his bills, and is self-medicating with alcohol. Kayla realizes what she had gotten herself into with this relationship but realizes that she loves him and can't leave him. On nights when Brian switches from beer to hard liquor, he gets violent and irrational, not even remembering what happened the next day. Because of Kayla's commitment to Brian, they decide to get married so that Kayla has easier access to Brian's medical information. She starts feeling more like a caregiver than a wife, but when Brian isn't drinking, they have a good relationship and enjoy each others company. Brian is frustrated that his brain isn't functioning properly as a result of his TBI, PTSD, and depression. One night, Brian threw over the coffee table and started shouting so Kayla locked herself in the bedroom and got the gun from the closet. Brian was banging on the door demanding to be let in. Kayla opened the door and said "End it." and gave the gun to Brian. Brian put the gun to Kayla's head and pulled the trigger. There were no bullets in the chamber. Kayla got out of the house and called the cops on Brian and stayed away from him for a while. Kayla came back to care for Brian and eventually, their fights went from nightly to small, non-violent arguments once a month. They got involved in VoteVets meetings, which helped Brian and Kayla. Eventually, Brian was offered a job at VoteVets and it improved his mental state tremendously, as he memorized senators and representatives, though it was at the expense of his other responsibilities. They both got involved volunteering at a local fire station, Brian got a job at Aspen, Kayla was advocating for female veterans, and they were overall improving as a couple. Kayla even got to go to a female veteran getaway and Brian was okay throughout the entire trip. The only thing missing from their lives were children. So they tried to get pregnant but nothing happened. They tried many things but eventually, they adopted a baby boy. Brian turned out to be an amazing, nurturing father. It helped that he had a daughter in his previous marriage. Brian was doing so much better and could even take a 45-minute bus ride to work. A year and a half later, Kayla learned that she was pregnant and gave birth to a baby girl. Kayla decided to try to get Brian looked at again since he had hardly any follow up after he was stitched up from his TBI. He got a physiatrist and got his health in check. Their relationship had started rocky, but towards the end, Kayla realized that her family was all she could ever want in life.  Kayla Williams was a great influence on American culture and society because of her willingness to change how Americans view veterans and the Army, as she was a vet herself. Kayla Williams advocated for female (and male) veterans. She served our country on three separate deployments from 2000 to 2004. She was an Arabic Linguist and SIGINT operations specialist for the US Army. She explained how she was forced to take part in torture interrogations of the Iraqi in a book of hers, leading to enlightenment and reformation in the US Army.  The theme of Plenty of Time When We Get Home is to never give up. In the army, Williams was forced to never give up the fight of getting weapons of mass destruction and terrorism off the face of the globe. She continues that through the writings of her book when she stayed with Brian even though she could never tell if he was the loving partner she knew, or the violent, liquor-drinking Brian that she feared. She stayed with him through the worst of times to help him improve his health so he could become the caring husband and father that she loved. She wrote, “But with a solid foundation of love and respect, with shared values and goals, the investment of sticking together through those tough times pays off in the long run” (Williams 237). Even though at times she wanted to give up on Brian and leave him for someone else to deal with, she never did because she loved and cared for him. She never gave up on Brian despite what they had been through.  I would recommend this book because it changed the way I viewed relationships, especially in the light of TBIs and mental illness. Normally, any violence should be a hard no to any relationship. However, in this light, with Brian’s TBI, he may not have had control over his breakdowns and behaviors. Kayla Williams’ perseverance amazes me. She went through years of traumatic war in Iraq and Afghanistan and she comes back and takes care of Brian and at points, she mentions that it was harder than being at war because she could control a gun, but she couldn’t control Brian’s behavior and mental state. This book is inspiring in many different ways and it taught me a lot about veterans outlook on life and the trials and tribulations of relationships.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heather Selig

    Powerful, well-written with raw emotions. Highly recommend.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kate Schwarz

    My dad suggested this title to me, so of course I read it. I'm glad I did. I learned a whole lot on many different levels: 1. Williams' husband suffered a TBI in Iraq, after they met but before they married. I learned a whole lot about the reality of PTSD. Mostly, one Soldier's experience with it, as it varies from individual to individual. The very sad state of the VA hospitals--I think that was the most gut-wrenching thing to read about. I hope that some has changed, but…I doubt a ton has chang My dad suggested this title to me, so of course I read it. I'm glad I did. I learned a whole lot on many different levels: 1. Williams' husband suffered a TBI in Iraq, after they met but before they married. I learned a whole lot about the reality of PTSD. Mostly, one Soldier's experience with it, as it varies from individual to individual. The very sad state of the VA hospitals--I think that was the most gut-wrenching thing to read about. I hope that some has changed, but…I doubt a ton has changed. Still, this quote stands out: "It's ineffective to always be on the attack without recognizing progress and positive efforts, which is why when I criticized the negative experiences Brian had at the DC VA, or female veteran friends had at other VA medical centers, I always made a point of also recognizing the good experiences I had at the Martinsburg VA." 2. One female veteran's experience. The sexual harassment many women in combat face. The added stress of being the lone female in a unite of all men. Upon her return home, she also had a hard time adjusting to civilian life. The frustration of not being recognized. For her, after being steeped in the Army culture, the added challenge of balancing being tough and being nurturing, of being independent and dependent as an individual and within a marriage. 3. What commitment looks like to Williams. I was floored that she stayed with him, and grateful for the Afterward where she talks in more sweeping, reflective paragraphs about why she stayed. "No buddy left behind on the battlefield" is something ingrained deeply in her, and that carried over from her life as a Soldier to a wife of someone who suffered deeply from PTSD. At some points in the book her decision to marry Brian and stay with Brian seemed downright stupid--she "deserved" better, she knew and her friends knew. And yet. She stayed and stuck it out and helped him regain his confidence and dignity and health. She kept herself busy, knowing "if I were just busy enough, I would not reflect, worry, fret, imagine…constant forward motion would substitute for contemplation." In the end, she saw it--her marriage, her commitment--through. She got good, hard advice at the right time and time has shown her that she made the right decision. 4. In my comfortable suburban life, this book was a reminder of how much my freedom costs, how far removed I am from the military. I'm grateful for Crossfit and my relationships with active duty and retired military personnel as well as emergency personnel, who live a different life as me, but…I couldn't have what I have without them doing what they do. (Thank you, veterans--those I know and do not.) Williams helped enlarge my perspective just a little, slap me back into reality, become grounded again by reminding me where I come from. More people should read this book. Rather than thank a veteran, maybe we all could take the next step and understand what they did and what they are dealing with just a little more.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    As a female veteran, I appreciated her perspective. I wad never stationed outside the states, but the lack of recognition that women do and have always served in the military is sometimes uncomfortable. I now volunteer at a VA MC, and most of the volunteers are veterans, including the women. I am now in a community of peers, and it is refreshing. I appreciate the brutal and honest accounting of the problems she and Brian had readjusting to the Civilian world. I never experienced that, but know man As a female veteran, I appreciated her perspective. I wad never stationed outside the states, but the lack of recognition that women do and have always served in the military is sometimes uncomfortable. I now volunteer at a VA MC, and most of the volunteers are veterans, including the women. I am now in a community of peers, and it is refreshing. I appreciate the brutal and honest accounting of the problems she and Brian had readjusting to the Civilian world. I never experienced that, but know many who did. I especially liked her explanations of Brian's TBI and PTSD issues. And some of her own adjustment issues. this is a powerful book that gives an insight to problems most Americans never experience, but who may have friends our family who do or will. the aftereffects of these wars will be with us for decades, this book will help a generation to understand the brutality of war in a different way.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Temple

    It is good to see this story told. It is far from easy to be a woman in the military, but to have gone through war, presents a whole new set of problems, with no easy answers. Kayla not only had her memories to haunt her, but all of the problems of Brian's brain injury. It is with sheer tenacity, and love, that enables them to move on. We,as civilians, need to hear of the struggles our returning veterans are facing. When you have been surviving on a lick and a prayer, the adjustments to our seemi It is good to see this story told. It is far from easy to be a woman in the military, but to have gone through war, presents a whole new set of problems, with no easy answers. Kayla not only had her memories to haunt her, but all of the problems of Brian's brain injury. It is with sheer tenacity, and love, that enables them to move on. We,as civilians, need to hear of the struggles our returning veterans are facing. When you have been surviving on a lick and a prayer, the adjustments to our seeming callousness are an added burden. Not to mention the lack of guidance in finding help for Brian's TBI. It is very hard to see them facing that type of adversity, when they have given up so much that we might walk without fear.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    very good. Really makes one understand the difficulties of transitioning back into civilian life. How difficult it must be to handle the trivial complaining, obsessing of society, after spending months of making life and death decisions. And the lack of treatment for vets by VA is disheartening...although I do believe that is continually improving.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    I enjoyed reading Kayla's story. I am thankful for the brave women and men that fought, struggled, and especially those who spoke up so others may be helped. It hit home because my husband is a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. I met him years after his recovery began however he still suffers from PTSD and it helped me get a clearer insight into his actions and mindset. What I will walk away with the most is from this excerpt, "Brian and I spend a lot of time talking about how to be effective I enjoyed reading Kayla's story. I am thankful for the brave women and men that fought, struggled, and especially those who spoke up so others may be helped. It hit home because my husband is a veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. I met him years after his recovery began however he still suffers from PTSD and it helped me get a clearer insight into his actions and mindset. What I will walk away with the most is from this excerpt, "Brian and I spend a lot of time talking about how to be effective in pushing for change. It makes us crazy when advocates, pundits, and politicians talk about military and veteran suicide without using the evidence-based guidelines developed to minimize the contagion effect or mentioning the Crisis Line (800-273-TALK, veterans press 1) - don't exacerbate a problem you claim to be trying to solve! And it's ineffective to always be on the attack without recognizing progress and positive efforts..." I think that if many more advocates would adapt this thinking we would have more change! A Goodreads Giveaway Winner. (I won forever ago and just rediscovered this book, a true gem.)

  12. 5 out of 5

    P. Upshaw

    Enlightening book about wars in Enlightening book about wars in Iraq and Afghanistan from the perspective of a woman get and her husband, who was severely injured. Issues of TBI, PTSD and the many challenges to these life altering issues, and returning to try to forge ahead against the military's failure to take care of returning injured soldiers, was very interesting. Enlightening book about wars in Enlightening book about wars in Iraq and Afghanistan from the perspective of a woman get and her husband, who was severely injured. Issues of TBI, PTSD and the many challenges to these life altering issues, and returning to try to forge ahead against the military's failure to take care of returning injured soldiers, was very interesting.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    Interesting but sad read...........it was a peek at life of a woman veteran and the wife of a soldier living with a traumatic brain injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. I am amazed at all that Kayla put up with in helping her boyfriend/husband to recovery while also dealing with her own issues from her own service. Many people wouldn't have been able to go through what she went through and come out positive. It also angered me to hear how she and her husband were treated by the military on Interesting but sad read...........it was a peek at life of a woman veteran and the wife of a soldier living with a traumatic brain injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. I am amazed at all that Kayla put up with in helping her boyfriend/husband to recovery while also dealing with her own issues from her own service. Many people wouldn't have been able to go through what she went through and come out positive. It also angered me to hear how she and her husband were treated by the military on their own personal roads to recovery from their experiences at war with Iraq. As soldiers who have fought on the front lines to protect our country, they deserved so much better! Hopefully, this system is made better with her books having been published to bring these problems to light. Reading this book I thought a lot about my neighbor and her husband. He is also a retired soldier dealing with recovery from a traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. My neighbor has shared a few things but this book also helped me to understand her reality and that of her husband too. She has mentioned his struggles to hold down a job, or to even help around the house. I do understand PTSD can be disabling but to read her story, helped me to better understand my neighbor who to the causal eye when I see him outside who appears "fine" but I know is fighting his own battles with his brain physically and emotionally every day. I have also been told how his anniversary date is hard and that he doesn't sleep for days. This book has helped me to think differently as I work/talk/interact with veterans and their families in the army town that I live in. I am a civilian who has always lead a civilian life until I moved to Carlisle, PA, 5 years ago and my strong respect for our armed forces has grown so much when I see the service and sacrifices these soldiers and families make for our country. Thank you Kayla and Brian for your service to our country!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I'm on page 235, an easy read with MOR vocabulary. For several years, I have been researching Army resiliency and it is interesting to read inside stories that give more insight into the lives of soldiers who are struggling with these issues. I picked this book after hearing an interview with the author and her husband on NPR. The interview was more interesting, but there are insights that are worth reading. Apparently this woman's choice of partner and chaotic life was influenced by her own uns I'm on page 235, an easy read with MOR vocabulary. For several years, I have been researching Army resiliency and it is interesting to read inside stories that give more insight into the lives of soldiers who are struggling with these issues. I picked this book after hearing an interview with the author and her husband on NPR. The interview was more interesting, but there are insights that are worth reading. Apparently this woman's choice of partner and chaotic life was influenced by her own unsettled upbringing. She says she felt no one else would want her and was not attracted to a nice, well-adjusted man she tried to date. She says she felt safe and protected with this man, and yet describes his periods of alcohol abuse, blind rages and violent, disrespectful behavior, even before she married him. Interesting the webs we weave. The second half was an improvement, had some redeeming parts. Still think 3 stars is the best choice.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Linda Thompson

    I didn't always like Ms. Williams but I really appreciate reading her story. As a female veteran (1985-1990) I've stopped telling people. It surprises me when people remember and acknowledge my service on Veteran's Day. I am grateful that she is bringing more attention to female veterans. This book is worth the read. I wish I could make civilians read it. Then they would understand how we treat our veterans I. This country. I have been horrified by the treatment of combat veterans. Civilians see I didn't always like Ms. Williams but I really appreciate reading her story. As a female veteran (1985-1990) I've stopped telling people. It surprises me when people remember and acknowledge my service on Veteran's Day. I am grateful that she is bringing more attention to female veterans. This book is worth the read. I wish I could make civilians read it. Then they would understand how we treat our veterans I. This country. I have been horrified by the treatment of combat veterans. Civilians seem to just spew whichever political line they follow from their news source. They don't understand that these are real people returning from a very bad situation.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I really enjoyed this book (hence the completion within 24 hours). My sister and brother-in-law served in Afghanistan and Iraq, respectively, and sometimes throughout this book I had to remind myself that it wasn't my sister speaking. Their story of love, perseverance and commitment was moving. Even though I've never been to war, I related to her frustrations with Americans who think they have "real problems" and care more about rich celebrities than our soldiers who come home with TBI and PTSD. I really enjoyed this book (hence the completion within 24 hours). My sister and brother-in-law served in Afghanistan and Iraq, respectively, and sometimes throughout this book I had to remind myself that it wasn't my sister speaking. Their story of love, perseverance and commitment was moving. Even though I've never been to war, I related to her frustrations with Americans who think they have "real problems" and care more about rich celebrities than our soldiers who come home with TBI and PTSD. I'm planning to read Kayla's first book next.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carol Wakefield

    The author, an Iraq veteran herself marries another veteran, one with a serious brain injury. The book relates their often very difficult journey to make progress against his PTSD and at times her need for control. And a story of the early days of inadequate physical and mental medical services for the returnees and of the specific problems women service persons meet both during and after wartime. A moving and informative book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    This was a great follow-up to her first book, Love My Rifle More Than You. This book takes place where the first book ended, but is mainly about her as caregiver to a severely wounded vet, her husband. It's a book I think all US citizens should read. It does a great job of detailing the struggles returning wounded warriors face. Please do yourself a favor and read the first book before starting this one. This was a great follow-up to her first book, Love My Rifle More Than You. This book takes place where the first book ended, but is mainly about her as caregiver to a severely wounded vet, her husband. It's a book I think all US citizens should read. It does a great job of detailing the struggles returning wounded warriors face. Please do yourself a favor and read the first book before starting this one.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    This book tells how an Arabic linguist and her husband met while serving in the Army in Iraq. Brian, the husband, suffers from a brain injury. It was a hard-to-read accounting of their relationship and Brian's long road to recovery. This book tells how an Arabic linguist and her husband met while serving in the Army in Iraq. Brian, the husband, suffers from a brain injury. It was a hard-to-read accounting of their relationship and Brian's long road to recovery.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Francie

    Interesting read- I now have a much better understanding of traumatic brain injuries and PTSD.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Reader

    well-written, coudn't put it down. well-written, coudn't put it down.

  22. 4 out of 5

    katnick

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lucky

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erinn

  26. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Sardam

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Bateman

  29. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.