web site hit counter Meneer Beerta - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Meneer Beerta

Availability: Ready to download

Meneer Beerta is het eerste deel van Het Bureau, een roman in zeven delen, die de menselijke verhoudingen op en rondom een wetenschappelijk instituut tussen de jaren 1957 en 1987 tot onderwerp heeft. Hoofdpersoon is Maarten Koning, die ook in Bij nader inzien - het debuut van J.J. Voskuil uit 1963 - centraal stond. Maarten Koning ervaart de maatschappij waarin hij een plaat Meneer Beerta is het eerste deel van Het Bureau, een roman in zeven delen, die de menselijke verhoudingen op en rondom een wetenschappelijk instituut tussen de jaren 1957 en 1987 tot onderwerp heeft. Hoofdpersoon is Maarten Koning, die ook in Bij nader inzien - het debuut van J.J. Voskuil uit 1963 - centraal stond. Maarten Koning ervaart de maatschappij waarin hij een plaats moet vinden als bedreigend en past zich moeilijk aan. Dat scherpt zijn blik voor zijn eigen tekortkomingen en die van zijn collega’s. In zijn ogen is de wereld waarin zij leven een schijnwereld, waarin mensen hun behoefte aan aandacht, erkenning of macht verbergen achter, schijnbaar zinvolle, maar in werkelijkheid zinloze werkzaamheden. Deze verborgen behoeften van mensen die elkaar niet hebben uitgezocht maar wel dag in dag uit met elkaar moeten verkeren, zijn aanleiding tot talloze wrijvingen en spanningen, een enkele maal met een tragische afloop, maar meestal komisch. Meneer Beerta beschrijft de jaren tussen 1957 en 1965 en eindigt met de pensionering van Beerta als directeur. Maarten heeft hem in zijn studietijd leren kennen als een beminnelijke scepticus en dat trekt hem aan. Van het geïdealiseerde beeld dat hij van hem heeft zal in de loop van het boek weinig overblijven, al verliest hij zijn sympathie niet. Tegelijkertijd is de lezer getuige van zijn vergeefse pogingen bondgenoten te zoeken in zijn afkeer van de in zijn ogen loze pretenties van de mensen waartussen hij terecht is gekomen.


Compare

Meneer Beerta is het eerste deel van Het Bureau, een roman in zeven delen, die de menselijke verhoudingen op en rondom een wetenschappelijk instituut tussen de jaren 1957 en 1987 tot onderwerp heeft. Hoofdpersoon is Maarten Koning, die ook in Bij nader inzien - het debuut van J.J. Voskuil uit 1963 - centraal stond. Maarten Koning ervaart de maatschappij waarin hij een plaat Meneer Beerta is het eerste deel van Het Bureau, een roman in zeven delen, die de menselijke verhoudingen op en rondom een wetenschappelijk instituut tussen de jaren 1957 en 1987 tot onderwerp heeft. Hoofdpersoon is Maarten Koning, die ook in Bij nader inzien - het debuut van J.J. Voskuil uit 1963 - centraal stond. Maarten Koning ervaart de maatschappij waarin hij een plaats moet vinden als bedreigend en past zich moeilijk aan. Dat scherpt zijn blik voor zijn eigen tekortkomingen en die van zijn collega’s. In zijn ogen is de wereld waarin zij leven een schijnwereld, waarin mensen hun behoefte aan aandacht, erkenning of macht verbergen achter, schijnbaar zinvolle, maar in werkelijkheid zinloze werkzaamheden. Deze verborgen behoeften van mensen die elkaar niet hebben uitgezocht maar wel dag in dag uit met elkaar moeten verkeren, zijn aanleiding tot talloze wrijvingen en spanningen, een enkele maal met een tragische afloop, maar meestal komisch. Meneer Beerta beschrijft de jaren tussen 1957 en 1965 en eindigt met de pensionering van Beerta als directeur. Maarten heeft hem in zijn studietijd leren kennen als een beminnelijke scepticus en dat trekt hem aan. Van het geïdealiseerde beeld dat hij van hem heeft zal in de loop van het boek weinig overblijven, al verliest hij zijn sympathie niet. Tegelijkertijd is de lezer getuige van zijn vergeefse pogingen bondgenoten te zoeken in zijn afkeer van de in zijn ogen loze pretenties van de mensen waartussen hij terecht is gekomen.

30 review for Meneer Beerta

  1. 5 out of 5

    Larou

    [Note: While I am placing this with the first volume of the novel, this review really is about the first four volumes.] One of the central conundrums for writers of realistic novels during the second half of the nineteenth century was how to describe boredom in a way that was not boring in itself, how to describe the mind-numbing blandness the ordinary life of the ordinary citizen had become without putting readers to sleep. At the end of the 20th century, J.J. Voskuil’s monumental (over 5,000 pa [Note: While I am placing this with the first volume of the novel, this review really is about the first four volumes.] One of the central conundrums for writers of realistic novels during the second half of the nineteenth century was how to describe boredom in a way that was not boring in itself, how to describe the mind-numbing blandness the ordinary life of the ordinary citizen had become without putting readers to sleep. At the end of the 20th century, J.J. Voskuil’s monumental (over 5,000 pages in seven volumes) novel Het Bureau showed that this was no longer a concern, and that by then it had become entirely possible to describe boredom in an utterly boring way and to not only get away with it, but to even produce a national bestseller. This might sound as if I disliked the novel (of which I have read the first four volumes so far, which is as far as the German translation has progressed at the time at which I’m writing this), but actually the contrary is true: Het Bureau describes the boring everyday lives of boring people doing boring things (mainly) at work and (occasionally) at home, and it does so without any kind of plot to liven things up, using a mostly boring language whose gray blandness is entirely suitable to its subject. Almost 3,000 pages of this (not even to mention the 5,200 of the complete novel) should have been completely unreadable and about as exciting as learning the phone book by heart, but J.J. Voskuil mysteriously manages to achieve an alchemy by which this massive assault of boredom actually becomes transmuted into something compelling and highly entertaining. I couldn’t really say how he accomplishes it, and from interviews I have read I received the impression that the author doesn’t quite know himself – his explanation that office life is something everyone knows from their own experience and can hence relate to seems not very convincing to me, as there are lots of novels about all kinds of things everyone can relate to which aren’t particularly successful either esthetically or commercially. I think we get closer to the hear of the matter if we consider Het Bureau as part of a novelistic trend that has become very popular in Europe and beyond in recent years: Multi-volume novels that are at least partly autobiographical with a slice-of-life approach to their mundane subject matter and combining an unflinching look at human foibles and weaknesses with an apparently artless, matter-of-fact language. I’m thinking of Elena Ferrante’s Neopolitan Novels and Knausgaard’s My Struggle both of which were huge popular successes not just in their native country but internationally as well, and I’m somewhat surprised that Het Bureau has not been translated into English yet as it clearly belongs to the same category of novel. Het Bureau, however, while based on the author’s own experiences, is the least personal of those – even though it does have a main protagonist in Maarten Koning, and we learn quite a bit about his private life in the course of the narrative, the novel’s emphasis is on an ensemble cast, and a very huge ensemble at that. At the centre is of course the titular office, the “Institute for Cultural Anthropology” (I’m not quite sure whether that is the correct English translation – it’s “Volkskunde” in the German version, a term which even today retains some traces of its Nazi origins, something which plays an important part in Voskuil’s novel as well), and the novel follows its vagaries over the course of 30 years. The model for Voskuil was not confessional literature then, and the literary progenitor looming in the background appears to me to be not so much Proust but rather Balzac. Indeed, I think in a way Het Bureau is the Comédie Humaine of the twenty-first century – except that Voskuil’s backstabbing bureaucrats are but a pale shadow of Balzac’s larger-than-life characters. The power-hungry, morally ruthless members of the rising bourgeoisie have all joined the civil service and turned into narrow-minded quibblers who scramble for a place in a committee, plot to overthrow their superiors or fake chronical illnesses – mean and petty rather than evil, the wolves and sharks of the nineteenth century have mutated into Chihuahuas and guppies. Possibly one might even have to go farther back to find something comparable to Het Bureau – the afterword to the second volume mentions novels about civil servants being a a genre in ancient China. I know next to nothing about ancient (or, indeed, contemporary) Chinese novels, but am seriously considering to remedy this once I’m done with the translated volumes of Voskuil. Since finishing the fourth volume of Het Bureau, I have read The Scholars by Wu Jingzi, a Chinese novel from the early 18th and supposedly a satire on the feudal examination system in ancient China, and there are indeed quite a few parallels one could draw. Parallels, though, which one could just as well draw between Wu Jingzi and Balzac, which is where things would start to get really interesting, in so far as one could start wondering just how big a debt Western realism owes to the Chinese novel… but that would probably lead us just a tad too far astray. Back to Voskuils and Het Bureau then, which despite its possible roots in classical and undoubted parallels in contemporary literature offers a reading experience quite unlike anything else. Mainly, I think, it is the combination between its vast scope with a simultaneous attention to minute detail which produces a weird, hypnotic effect on the reader, an effect which is even further enhanced by the constant repetition of events and endless circularity of arguments – Philip Glass should turn this into an opera, or even better a series of operas, the Ring of minimalist music. In fact, similar to Glass’ music, even as nothing new ever seems to happen, the same persons doing the same things over and over or refusing to do them again and again with always the same arguments, even as the novel’s main protagonist despairs of the mind-crushing monotony and sameness, there are shifts and changes happening throughout the volumes. True, they occur at about the speed of continental drift, but they are noticeable – while the first volume of the novel still gives a large amount of space to the actual work the employees of the Institute do, this moves increasingly into the background as the novel progress, to be replaced by intritues both inside the office itself as well as the wider world of Europena academia. In parallel to that, Maarten Koning changes, too; while he never (not until the end of volume four at least) ceases to view the work he is doing as essentialy pointless and devoid of any real purpose, that work takes up more and more of his life, to the continued (and very vocal) chagrin of his wife who finds her time with her husband being eaten up by his office life. Het Bureau spans several decades, and during that time, a whole host of people come and go, none of which is (and that includes the protagonist and alter ego of the author, Maarten Koning) particularly likeable – even people who appear nice when we encounter them for the first time eventually become ground down by the mindless apparatus of the “Institut für Volkskunde” and invariably end up showing their unlikable, sometimes even their outright nasty side. While not every single member of the novel’s huge cast is equally memorable, many of them will stick in the reader’s memory. To name just two of those, there is Director Beerta, the founder of the Institute and initially Maarten’s boss – he is basically a windbag with a knack for ingratiating himself with the winning side in any argument. He is utterly without scruples about backstabbing even his closest colleagues, but at the same time possesses an undeniable charm which lets him get away with it again and again. Utterly without charm, on the other hand, is Bart Asjes, one of Maarten’s subordinates, and quite likely the most unlikable character I have ever encountered in any piece of fiction. He not only refuses to do any work, but gets everyone who tries to make him do anything involved in lengthy, pointless arguments; he is always opposed on general principle to everything anyone else proposes, but of course never has anything constructive to offer in return. One really has to read the novel to appreciate just how much of a pain he is, and it indeed in things like this characterisation of Bart Asjes where Voskuil’s method pays off gloriously – after having been mercilessly exposed to one of his suadas for the dozenth time, the reader eventually starts to hate Bart just as much as Maarten does, and I caught myself several times grinding my teeth at the prospect of him sabotaging yet another entirely reasonable suggestion. By sparing the reader nothing, by elaborating every painful detail and then repeating it over and over again, the reader gets drawn into the story just as Maarten is swallowed up by the office, and the unfurling of events ultimately achieves an almost physical impact, even in spite of the mostly bland prose. This again makes reading Het Bureau sound like an unpleasant experience, so let me hasten to add once again that it is emphatically not so, but to the contrary remains highly enjoyable even over 3,000 pages of utter meaninglessness. This is at least partially due to the novel being quite funny – not in a comedy way, nothing here is played for laughs, and it can be very depressing at times. There is no comedic mise-en-scène here at all, but the bare factuality of what happens or does not happen is often so utterly absurd that the reader finds himself laughing out loudly even while blinking in disbelief at what they just read. Again, this is something one has to experience and which can’t really be summarized as the effect is achieved by the peculiar way the novel unspools its narrative. In fact, I could not help but wonder whether Het Bureau really should be considered a novel and not rather a work of Cultural Anthropology, which investigates and preserves the strange rituals of 20th century academics in the Netherlands just as those academics examine Dutch folklore. But then, the novel being what it is, the two are maybe not mutually exclusive and Het Bureau is a novelistic museum which we do not so much read as wander through, gawking, gasping and giggling at the bizarre way the inhabitants of the late 20th century allowed their work to consume their life. And viewed like that, it is probably not at allt strange but seems like an always intended part of Het Bureau that when the original for the novel’s Institute was moving, its staff were giving guided tours to the public while wearing tags with the names of their counterpart novel characters.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Het eerste deel van deze zeven-delige romancyclus heb ik gelezen bij de eerste uitgave. Hoewel ik me er weinig van herinnerde is me toch steeds bijgebleven dat ik veel plezier aan het lezen ervan beleefd hebt. Begin dit jaar (2012) las ik per toeval een oude recensie over het boek en besloot ik (in een vlaag van verstadsverbijstering) de hele cyclus te lezen. Gelukkig vond ik in een Nederlands antiquariaat de zeven romans in goede staat. Ik nam mezelf voor om hier een half jaar voor uit te trekke Het eerste deel van deze zeven-delige romancyclus heb ik gelezen bij de eerste uitgave. Hoewel ik me er weinig van herinnerde is me toch steeds bijgebleven dat ik veel plezier aan het lezen ervan beleefd hebt. Begin dit jaar (2012) las ik per toeval een oude recensie over het boek en besloot ik (in een vlaag van verstadsverbijstering) de hele cyclus te lezen. Gelukkig vond ik in een Nederlands antiquariaat de zeven romans in goede staat. Ik nam mezelf voor om hier een half jaar voor uit te trekken. Het gaat immers toch om meer dan 5000 pagina's. Het half jaar is voorbij, de zeven romans zijn gelezen en ik heb ervan genoten. In de zeven romans is er quasi geen 'actie'; er wordt constant herhaald (het ritueel met de pijp, de flessen melk halen, de naamplaatjes verschuiven, etc...); de personages zijn op het randje af oervervelend; ... en toch is dit een fantastische leeservaring! Hoe Voskuil erin slaagt om dit alles pagina na pagina boeiend te houden is mij een raadsel, maar hij slaagt er wonderwel in. Je wordt volledig ondergedompeld in de saaie, burgerlijke wereld van de bureaucratie. Niemand wil zich vereenzelvigen met Maarten Koning, maar toch zit hij in elk van ons. De wereld van Maarten wordt onze wereld en zijn verzet en uiteindelijke capitulatie is ons verzet en onze capitulatie. In het nederlandstalig gebied durf ik dit een meesterwerk noemen.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris Flinterman

    Een goed begin is het halve werk en dit is zeker een goed begin van de reeks. Voskuil heeft een scherp oog in zijn observaties, waardoor hij snel doordringt tot de kern van de problemen. De situaties zijn vaak herkenbaar in hun absurditeit, waardoor de roman vaak een lach op je gezicht tovert (en bij sommige situaties, zoals de Nieuwjaarkaarten, moest ik hardop lachen). Het enige minpunt: de vele namen zijn soms erg verwarrend, zeker in het begin. Gelukkig is er daarvoor een register!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Arjen

    Say hello to my new addiction; this first part of the 7 volume (> 5000 pages) monstrous novel, spans about 760 pages and not one of them is boring. The novel is an autobiographical account of the life of a self conscious young man who studied Dutch language in university and who accepts a job at a national "Folk art and language institute". He despises science and hierarchy but hates being a teacher even more. The novel is about being powerless against the weight of the world. Although Maarten, th Say hello to my new addiction; this first part of the 7 volume (> 5000 pages) monstrous novel, spans about 760 pages and not one of them is boring. The novel is an autobiographical account of the life of a self conscious young man who studied Dutch language in university and who accepts a job at a national "Folk art and language institute". He despises science and hierarchy but hates being a teacher even more. The novel is about being powerless against the weight of the world. Although Maarten, the protagonist, has zero interest in his work and hates his colleagues considering themselves important, during the novel you see him very gradually changing and becoming just like them. Luckily there are 4300 more pages to read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Fabian

    Wat een m-mieters eerste d-deel van deze romancyclus. De op het eerste gezicht saaie kantoorbeschrijvingen volgen elkaar in rap tempo op, waarna het bijzondere in het alledaagse snel naar boven komt drijven.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Al twintig jaar lang hoor ik steeds: je moet Voskuil eens lezen. Dat vond ik erg bedreigend en ik zei dan altijd: Dat ga ik natuurlijk niet doen. Het leken me verschrikkelijke boeken. Ik had er alleen geen argumenten voor. Alles in mij verzette zich tegen dat advies, maar ik had geen verweer en voelde me in de steek gelaten. Dan zweeg ik verward en ging ontevreden over mezelf naar huis. Maar nu ben ik er dan toch maar eens aan begonnen en het is mieters. Het is natuurlijk allemaal onzin, en die M Al twintig jaar lang hoor ik steeds: je moet Voskuil eens lezen. Dat vond ik erg bedreigend en ik zei dan altijd: Dat ga ik natuurlijk niet doen. Het leken me verschrikkelijke boeken. Ik had er alleen geen argumenten voor. Alles in mij verzette zich tegen dat advies, maar ik had geen verweer en voelde me in de steek gelaten. Dan zweeg ik verward en ging ontevreden over mezelf naar huis. Maar nu ben ik er dan toch maar eens aan begonnen en het is mieters. Het is natuurlijk allemaal onzin, en die Maarten Koning is verschrikkelijk. Maar dat is juist zo leuk.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    God wat geniet ik hiervan. Die in en in droge humor en pietluttigheid en het gemopper oh het gemopper.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Annemarie

    Mooie beschrijving van de dagelijkse 'belevenissen' op een wetenschappelijk instituut. Maarten Koning ziet zijn werk bij het Bureau slechts als een manier om zijn brood te verdienen. Hij heeft totaal geen interesse voor zijn werkzaamheden, die voornamelijk bestaan uit het onderzoek doen naar culturele verschijnselen en het bezoeken van correspondenten. Naar mate het boek vordert raakt Maarten, tegen zijn zin, steeds meer betrokken bij allerhande cultuurcommissies en -besturen. De personages zijn Mooie beschrijving van de dagelijkse 'belevenissen' op een wetenschappelijk instituut. Maarten Koning ziet zijn werk bij het Bureau slechts als een manier om zijn brood te verdienen. Hij heeft totaal geen interesse voor zijn werkzaamheden, die voornamelijk bestaan uit het onderzoek doen naar culturele verschijnselen en het bezoeken van correspondenten. Naar mate het boek vordert raakt Maarten, tegen zijn zin, steeds meer betrokken bij allerhande cultuurcommissies en -besturen. De personages zijn ook het vermelden waard. Niemand is vrij van enige imperfecties. Zo maakt de lezer kennis met de tirannieke Nicolien Koning, die haar echtgenoot het liefst de hele dag thuis ziet en leert men meneer Beerta kennen, een latente homoseksueel die het Bureau als zijn levenswerk beschouwt. Toch houdt hij zich, zoals veel directeuren, vooral bezig met nevenfuncties. Verder heeft Maarten talloze kleurrijke collega's, zoals de volkse De Bruin, de hysterische juffrouw (mevrouw!) Haan en de norse Balk. Nergens worden de karakters typetjes, wat wel een gevaar kan zijn als je zoveel personen in een roman wilt stoppen. Doordat het verhaal op het eerste gezicht blijft voortkabbelen, worden normale gebeurtenissen, zoals een rondvaart ter gelegenheid van het afscheid van directeur Van der Haar en zelfs het presenteren van kersenbonbons bij de koffie tot zeer speciale gelegenheden verheven. Voskuil zet de gezapigheid van het kantoorbestaan perfect neer.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Een'mens erger je niet'boek. De dialogen waren soms geweldig en ik had de neiging tot highlighten Het hoofdpersonage Maarten sleepte zich voort door de tijd op het bureau en dat merk je ook in het boek. Terwijl het hele boek toch een periode van 7 jaar beschijft. Een'mens erger je niet'boek. De dialogen waren soms geweldig en ik had de neiging tot highlighten Het hoofdpersonage Maarten sleepte zich voort door de tijd op het bureau en dat merk je ook in het boek. Terwijl het hele boek toch een periode van 7 jaar beschijft.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beau

    Ik heb dit boek gelezen omdat het geen pretenties heeft.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maarten

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Dit smaakt naar meer. Een wonderlijk boek. Maarten Koning, wat ik een prachtnaam vind, is de hoofdpersonage en hij is werkzaam als hoofd volkscultuur op Het Bureau. Zo schrijft de heer Koning over kabouters en de nageboorte van het paard. Doel hierbij is om op een geografische kaart culturele grenzen te ontdekken gezien de verschillende gewoontes van mensen. Maarten Koning is wars van ijver, interessantdoenerij, gewichtigdoenerij, gedrevenheid, pretenties en macht. Hij vindt zijn werk en het wer Dit smaakt naar meer. Een wonderlijk boek. Maarten Koning, wat ik een prachtnaam vind, is de hoofdpersonage en hij is werkzaam als hoofd volkscultuur op Het Bureau. Zo schrijft de heer Koning over kabouters en de nageboorte van het paard. Doel hierbij is om op een geografische kaart culturele grenzen te ontdekken gezien de verschillende gewoontes van mensen. Maarten Koning is wars van ijver, interessantdoenerij, gewichtigdoenerij, gedrevenheid, pretenties en macht. Hij vindt zijn werk en het werk van Het Bureau zinloos. Ik vind hem eerlijk en een scherp observator van mensen en dingen. Het leven beangstigt hem: ‘het leek zinloos geworden. Chaotische leegte waarin hij dreigde te verdwijnen.’ Zijn dromen zijn beklemmend. Leegte, uitzichtloosheid, angsten zijn terugkerende thema’s in zijn dromen: ‘een muur die om zijn bed wordt opgebouwd met een hand over de rand’ In het boek zijn ook geluksmomenten van Maarten Koning opgenomen. Een verlicht raam of stilte geeft hem een geluksgevoel. Zijn geluk lijkt zich te bevinden in de momenten dat hij observeert. Ik vind Voskuil kernachtig schrijven waardoor hij zuinig is met woorden (ondanks de 7 delen en 5000 pagina’s) en hij grossiert in korte zinnen. Ik houd daarvan. Hij heeft oog voor voorwerpen die zich bevinden in de beschreven ruimtes. Er wordt sfeer gecreëerd door het stelselmatig duiden van de mate van verlichting of lichtinval. Maarten Koning en ook overige personages zeggen herhaaldelijk iets met een irritatie of een onwilligheid en zij doen regelmatig iets werktuiglijk. Ik heb ook mooie ouderwetse woorden en uitdrukkingen gelezen zoals: mieters; de portee; een perfide opmerking; sub rosa. Oh ja, de naamgevingen, die zijn goed. Ter illustratie: naast Maarten Koning wordt onder meer ook juffrouw Haan opgevoerd. Zij gedraagt zich als haantje de voorste en de heer De Bruin verzorgt de koffie op Het Bureau. De dialogen zijn veelal humoristisch en intrigeren. Zeker de gesprekken tussen Maarten Koning en meneer Beerta. Meneer Beerta is de directeur van Het Bureau. Maarten Koning is werkzaam in de kamer van meneer Beerta. Meneer Beerta past zijn gedrag aan. Hij houdt rekening met de cultuur. Hij conformeert zich aan het gebruikelijke. Hij houdt rekening met dat wat werkt en probeert een goede indruk te maken bij de commissie. Hierin contrasteert hij met Koning. Anton Beerta is pragmatisch en Maarten Koning is star en hij past zich niet aan. Het botst nogal eens tussen Beerta en Koning. Er is ook genegenheid tussen de heren ondanks de irritaties en vele twisten. Maarten Koning voelt zich genoodzaakt, wat in mijn optiek niet congruent is, om zijn afdeling uit te breiden conform de heersende verwachtingen en plaats te nemen in een commissie ter vervanging van Beerta. De overwegingen en keuzes hiertoe van Maarten Koning worden stellig afgekeurd door zijn vrouw Nicolien. Nicolien is namelijk getrouwd met een man waar zij respect voor heeft en zij is niet getrouwd met een man met status. Als het aan haar ligt stopt Maarten sowieso met werken. De ruzies tussen Nicolien en Maarten zijn treffend verwoord in de echtelijke dialogen. De relaties worden belicht tussen Maarten Koning en zijn collega’s, vriend Klaas en zijn vader. Frans Veen is werkzaam geweest op Het Bureau. Hij neemt ontslag. Hij blijkt een psychiatrisch patiënt te zijn. Er ontstaat een vriendschap tussen Frans en het echtpaar Koning. Nicolien koestert respect voor Frans, zoals blijkt uit de driegesprekken. Al gaandeweg volgen we de ontwikkelingen van Het Bureau. Anton Beerta gaat met pensioen. Het Bureau #1 Meneer Beerta verscherpt allicht mijn zienswijze op werken in het algemeen en het relativeert werken met zekerheid in het bijzonder. Op naar Het Bureau #2 Vuile handen!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gijs Zandbergen

    Ik heb me voorgenomen dit jaar Het bureau te herlezen. Daar kan ik rustig een jaar over doen, en misschien langer, omdat het feitelijk niet meer is dan een tot roman omgewerkt dagboek. Ik herinner me dat Kees Fens, toen ik hem bezocht, tegen mij zei dat hij het boek niet had gelezen, omdat hij ”Bij nader inzien” niks vond. Soms zag hij Voskuil wel eens lopen aan de overkant van de gracht, maar hij was er nooit toegekomen hem aan te spreken. Ook een beetje uit gemakzucht, want dan hoefde hij hem Ik heb me voorgenomen dit jaar Het bureau te herlezen. Daar kan ik rustig een jaar over doen, en misschien langer, omdat het feitelijk niet meer is dan een tot roman omgewerkt dagboek. Ik herinner me dat Kees Fens, toen ik hem bezocht, tegen mij zei dat hij het boek niet had gelezen, omdat hij ”Bij nader inzien” niks vond. Soms zag hij Voskuil wel eens lopen aan de overkant van de gracht, maar hij was er nooit toegekomen hem aan te spreken. Ook een beetje uit gemakzucht, want dan hoefde hij hem niet te zeggen wat hij van zijn boeken dacht. Ik kon het altijd goed vinden met Kees Fens, wiens maandagstukken ik zondagavond vaak doorgaf, en tegen wie ik rustig kon zeggen ervan vond. Dat waardeerde hij, ook als ik kritiek had. Ingeval van Voskuil heb ik gezegd dat ik het wel goede boeken vond, maar daar ging hij niet op in.

  13. 5 out of 5

    jrz

    Absolutely brilliant - really loved it! Quite unusual in its approach to describe the everyday life of an office worker as an ongoing stream of everyday experiences. Everything is equally important and so nothing is really important. Does really reflect the/my experiences working in an office, even if the Netherlands in the 1960s and the work in a research insitute are kind of special compared to my office world. But one thing is never changing: Your colleagues can make you heaven or hell and som Absolutely brilliant - really loved it! Quite unusual in its approach to describe the everyday life of an office worker as an ongoing stream of everyday experiences. Everything is equally important and so nothing is really important. Does really reflect the/my experiences working in an office, even if the Netherlands in the 1960s and the work in a research insitute are kind of special compared to my office world. But one thing is never changing: Your colleagues can make you heaven or hell and sometimes both. Really hoping that the next seven books will be also translated in German.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Berit Sluyters

    Met veel plezier de hele serie gelezen, jaren geleden al. Bandrecorderproza volgens Marjan. Daar zit wat in, soort ver doorgevoerd naturalisme. Maar gaat ook een man die voornamelijk in zijn hoofd leeft - haha, en met een moeilijke vrouw.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sindy

    Ambtenarij! :-)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Arjan

    Een mieters boek.

  17. 4 out of 5

    JuneAutumn

    „Ich habe“, sagte er, mit einer kurzen Kopfbewegung, um sein Stottern unter Kontrolle zu bringen, „eine Stelle für dich.“ Er sah ihn ernst an. „Wenn du willst, kannst du sie haben.“ Das Angebot überraschte Maarten. „Ich kann für die Arbeiten am Atlas der Volkskultur einen wissenschaftlichen Beamten einstellen“, sagte Beerta, langsam und präzise. (S.8) Maarten Koning nimmt also eine Stelle als wissenschaftlicher Beamter bei Direktor Beerta an und geht von nun an jeden Tag ins Büro. Seine erste Auf „Ich habe“, sagte er, mit einer kurzen Kopfbewegung, um sein Stottern unter Kontrolle zu bringen, „eine Stelle für dich.“ Er sah ihn ernst an. „Wenn du willst, kannst du sie haben.“ Das Angebot überraschte Maarten. „Ich kann für die Arbeiten am Atlas der Volkskultur einen wissenschaftlichen Beamten einstellen“, sagte Beerta, langsam und präzise. (S.8) Maarten Koning nimmt also eine Stelle als wissenschaftlicher Beamter bei Direktor Beerta an und geht von nun an jeden Tag ins Büro. Seine erste Aufgabe wird sein, das Vorkommen von Wichtelmännchen in Volkserzählungen zu finden, zu bewerten und aufgrund dessen Kulturgrenzen zwischen Landstrichen festzustellen und auf Karten einzuzeichnen. Maarten hält dies für vollkommen sinnlos, aber irgendetwas muss er ja schließlich tun, da ihm sein voriger Job als Lehrer noch weniger zugesagt hat. Er teilt sich sein Büro mit Beerta, aber es gibt natürlich eine Reihe an Mitarbeitern, die ein recht breites Spektrum an Menschentypen abstecken – die Ehrgeizige, der Gelangweilte, der Gleichgültige, der Streber usw. Mit all diesen Menschen muss Maarten sich nun auseinandersetzen, und zwischenmenschliche Beziehungen sind nicht seine Stärke. Er beginnt mit dem Erstellen eines Karteikastensystems, um die Fragebögen, die die Menschen zur Beantwortung eingeschickt haben, in irgendeiner Weise systematisch ordnen zu können. Er sagt sich, dass er nichts davon verstehe, aber hoffe, eines Tages durchblicken zu können. So lange fügt er jeden Tag neue Karten hinzu und vergrößert sein Archiv. Sein Alltag ist bestimmt von zwischenmenschlichen Konflikten, zumindest empfindet er die meisten Interaktionen so. Beerta liebt seine Arbeit, ist allerdings ein Hans-Dampf-in-allen-Gassen und jongliert seine vielen Beschäftigungen oft wie ein Artist. Maartens Frau Nicolien ist dagegen, dass er im Büro arbeitet, sie hätte ihn lieber für sich allein, was zusätzlich für Konflikte sorgt. So schwankt Maarten zwischen Desinteresse, Desillusionierung, Wut, Gleichgültigkeit und ja, manchmal auch Momenten des Sich-Einfindens. J.J. Voskuil hat in seinem 7 Bände und über 5000 Seiten umfassenden Epos seinem Dasein als Beamter ein Denkmal gesetzt. Maarten Koning ist sein Alter Ego, und getreulich gibt er den Alltag in seinem Büro wieder, der schließlich 30 Jahre umfassen soll. Direktor Beerta ist der erste der 7 Bände, der seinen Einstieg unter Beertas Regime beschreibt. Der Roman ist sehr dialoglastig, Voskuils Sprache allerdings ist karg und wurde wohl als „beamtenhaft“ bezeichnet. So vermittelt er den stets gleichen Charakter der aufeinanderfolgenden Tage, der stets gleichen Gespräche, Konflikte, Probleme; viele Dialoge laufen ins Leere, bleiben im Raum hängen, was, wenn man sich dies einmal vor Augen führt, überall so geschieht. Er entlarvt die Leere der zwischenmenschlichen Handlungen, die Vergeblichkeit des Versuchs, Sinnlosem Sinn verleihen zu wollen, die Eiseskälte beim Gedanken, dass das alles gewesen sein sollte, was ein Leben ausmacht. Doch es ist kein verzweifelter Roman, kein düsterer oder höhnischer, ganz im Gegenteil, er ist unglaublich amüsant. Er deckt schonungslos, doch nicht boshaft die menschlichen Abgründe auf, lässt einen über die Umwege und „Lösungen“ schmunzeln, die für die unterschiedlichsten Probleme gefunden werden, lässt den Leser sich verstanden fühlen, denn wer hat sich die Fragen nach Sinn und Unsinn nicht schon oft gestellt?! Voskuil hat mit Maarten Koning eine Identifikationsfigur geschaffen, was, wie ich mir vorstelle, den großen Erfolg seiner Romane erklärt. In den Niederlanden wurden – bei einer Bevölkerung von 17 Millionen Menschen – eine halbe Million der Romane verkauft. Menschen fieberten auf den nächsten Roman hin, litten mit Maarten Koning mit, es gab eine Hörspielausgabe des gesamten Zyklus in 475 Folgen, die sogar wegen der hohen Nachfrage wiederholt wurde (mal sehen, ob man da herankommen kann!). Das Büro wird als „Seifenoper für Intellektuelle“ bezeichnet, und auch wenn ich das für etwas despektierlich halte, kann ich mich der Anziehung, des „Suchtfaktors“, nicht erwehren. Ich kann es kaum erwarten, Band 2 in die Hände zu bekommen, wie auch die übrigen Bände, und möchte jedem, der nach guter Unterhaltung sucht, diesen ersten Roman ans Herz legen – der Rest, denke ich, erledigt sich dann von selbst!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alex Knipping

    Dit is wel een boek waar je tegen moet kunnen. In het begin zit je als lezer toch te wachten op een spannende ontwikkeling, een onverwacht perspectief of een filosofische beschouwing. Het is er allemaal niet of nauwelijks. Maarten Koning is vooral toeschouwer bij het 'leven in het klein'. We worden deelgenoot van zijn observaties van de kleingeestige mens, de saaie routine van werk dat nauwelijks zinvol lijkt. Allemaal niet een reden om dit boek te gaan lezen, maar gelukkig is er meer. Het is oo Dit is wel een boek waar je tegen moet kunnen. In het begin zit je als lezer toch te wachten op een spannende ontwikkeling, een onverwacht perspectief of een filosofische beschouwing. Het is er allemaal niet of nauwelijks. Maarten Koning is vooral toeschouwer bij het 'leven in het klein'. We worden deelgenoot van zijn observaties van de kleingeestige mens, de saaie routine van werk dat nauwelijks zinvol lijkt. Allemaal niet een reden om dit boek te gaan lezen, maar gelukkig is er meer. Het is ook een boek met rake karakterschetsen, vaak van personen die zich niet zo makkelijk staande weten te houden in een wereld die ze als complex ervaren. Ze zijn niet altijd sympathiek, maar wel 'echt' en herkenbaar. Je komt ze op elke straathoek tegen. Het is ook een goede sfeerschets van de overgangsperiode van de wederopbouw naar de jaren zestig. Een licht optimisme schemert door het boek heen, door het grauwe alledaagse. De hoofdpersonen worden onwillekeurig een beetje dierbaar, mensen die je kent en waarvan je wilt weten hoe het ze vergaat. Ik zal de vervolgdelen niet achter elkaar verslinden, maar een deel op z'n tijd, dat lijkt me toch wel leuk.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janneke

    Ik heb het boek met plezier gelezen. Het verhaal begint als de hoofdpersoon Maarten Koning aan het werk gaat voor Het Bureau. Op het bureau houdt men zich bezig met het onderzoek naar allerlei cultuurgrenzen. Maarten komt te werken bij en voor Anton Beerta, de directeur van het Bureau, en houdt zich onder andere bezig met een onderzoek naar kabouters en het ophangen van de nageboorte van paarden. Een en ander is volgens Maarten behoorlijk zinloos, maar ach "je moet toch ergens geld mee verdienen Ik heb het boek met plezier gelezen. Het verhaal begint als de hoofdpersoon Maarten Koning aan het werk gaat voor Het Bureau. Op het bureau houdt men zich bezig met het onderzoek naar allerlei cultuurgrenzen. Maarten komt te werken bij en voor Anton Beerta, de directeur van het Bureau, en houdt zich onder andere bezig met een onderzoek naar kabouters en het ophangen van de nageboorte van paarden. Een en ander is volgens Maarten behoorlijk zinloos, maar ach "je moet toch ergens geld mee verdienen". Maarten is een onzeker iemand die slecht is in het leggen van contacten. Dit belemmert hem ook in de omgang met zijn collega's. Zijn vrouw Nicolien steunt hem ook niet echt. Zij zou lever zien dat Maarten ontslag neemt en weer gezellig bij haar thuis komt. Je krijgt de indruk dat het hele verhaal wat wereldvreemd is ook door de personen die een rol spelen en het werk dat gedaan wordt op het Bureau. Toch nodigt het mij wel uit tot het lezen van deel 2.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elly Van

    Het boek begint in een periode dat ik een peuter was. Heel herkenbaar dus. Het leven is saai, het werk levert geen genoegen. De hoofdpersoon Maarten Koning wil niet vooruit komen in het leven. Als hem loonsverhoging in het vooruitzicht wordt gesteld, wil hij weigeren want ze weten nu al niet hoe ze het verdiende loon op moeten maken. Dat is vreemd voor die tijd. De baan is een soort bezigheidstherapie, per dag wordt er weinig uitgevoerd. Tot blz. 550 vond ik het nog wel aardig. De schrijfstijl va Het boek begint in een periode dat ik een peuter was. Heel herkenbaar dus. Het leven is saai, het werk levert geen genoegen. De hoofdpersoon Maarten Koning wil niet vooruit komen in het leven. Als hem loonsverhoging in het vooruitzicht wordt gesteld, wil hij weigeren want ze weten nu al niet hoe ze het verdiende loon op moeten maken. Dat is vreemd voor die tijd. De baan is een soort bezigheidstherapie, per dag wordt er weinig uitgevoerd. Tot blz. 550 vond ik het nog wel aardig. De schrijfstijl van Voskuil is erg mooi maar het zinloze van de levens van de mensen van het bureau ging me tegenstaan.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Meikoningin

    This book is an autobiographic account of a man who works in the same scientific office for thirty years. The book is over 5,500 pages thick, divided in 7 parts, but it is easy to read. On the surface nothing seems to be happening, yet at the same time there is a lot happening. The book is an interpretation of one person's perception of his every day surroundings. Anyone working in an office environment, especially a scientific or governmental one, can find something, if not a lot, he or she can r This book is an autobiographic account of a man who works in the same scientific office for thirty years. The book is over 5,500 pages thick, divided in 7 parts, but it is easy to read. On the surface nothing seems to be happening, yet at the same time there is a lot happening. The book is an interpretation of one person's perception of his every day surroundings. Anyone working in an office environment, especially a scientific or governmental one, can find something, if not a lot, he or she can relate to in this book, for example petty little arguments with colleagues, tiresome meetings, pointless work and dull coffee conversations.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Het boek geeft een mooi beeld van een onderzoeksinstituut in de jaren ‘50/‘60. Dat het tempo van het boek laag ligt is niet zo erg, het voelt alsof je alles wat er gebeurd in detail volgt. Jammer vond ik alleen de negatieve toon die Maarten en Nicoline vaak hebben, waardoor het boek soms negatief geladen is. Al met al wist dit boek me maar af en toe te boeien en ik twijfel nog of ik alle 7 delen ga lezen...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Serge Migom

    Angstaanjagend confronterend als ambtenaar (in de cultuursector). Je herkent jezelf plots in de dagelijkse beslommeringen van Maarten Koning of één van zin collega's. En je collega's krijgen plots de allure van personages uit het bureau. En die bijnamen raken ze nooit meer kwijt... Een traag boek, een trage reeks, herhalend, steeds hetzelfde, een variatie op een thema, steeds lichtjes anders, maar van een meeslepend ritme. Angstaanjagend confronterend als ambtenaar (in de cultuursector). Je herkent jezelf plots in de dagelijkse beslommeringen van Maarten Koning of één van zin collega's. En je collega's krijgen plots de allure van personages uit het bureau. En die bijnamen raken ze nooit meer kwijt... Een traag boek, een trage reeks, herhalend, steeds hetzelfde, een variatie op een thema, steeds lichtjes anders, maar van een meeslepend ritme.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    Hoe leuk kan een boek over kantoor- en ambtenarenbestaan zijn? Nou...heel erg leuk! Geen moment is dit boek saai. Maak kennis met Maarten Koning en zijn collega's en zijn 'onzinnige' werk. Het zogenaamd saaie kantoorleven wordt in steeds korte stukjes verteld. Daardoor blijft het makkelijk leesbaar en interessant om verder te lezen. Op naar deel twee Hoe leuk kan een boek over kantoor- en ambtenarenbestaan zijn? Nou...heel erg leuk! Geen moment is dit boek saai. Maak kennis met Maarten Koning en zijn collega's en zijn 'onzinnige' werk. Het zogenaamd saaie kantoorleven wordt in steeds korte stukjes verteld. Daardoor blijft het makkelijk leesbaar en interessant om verder te lezen. Op naar deel twee

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ed van der Winden

    Ik heb dit boek in een opwelling meegenomen uit de bibliotheek. Gelukkig maar. Herkenbare situaties van het werken in een kantooromgeving - zelfs 50 jaar na de tijd waarin dit verhaal zich afspeelt. Voskuils stijl zorgt dat je onvermoeibaar door blijft lezen.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nelleke

    Heerlijk boek. Geweldig geschreven. Je gelooft meteen dat het daadwerkelijk zo was. Een mooi volgestouwd kantoor met boeken en papier, asbak op tafel met de bijbehorende verschillende typetjes. Geweldig.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sanne

    Beetje traag, maar ontzettend grappig. Wat een schaamte en ongemak! Wat een onhandige en starre man is Maarten. En wat een moeilijke vrouw is Nicolien! En toch kun je voor beide ook echt wel sympathie hebben. Zoveel mooie personages. Zal ik de rest ook lezen...?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joost van Hoek

    Geestig en herkenbaar. Sinds de jaren zestig is er dus niet zo veel veranderd.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Piet Van

    Jos Jacobs was enthousiastic about all the volumes of The Office. A pity I couldn't share this. Found it boring. Jos Jacobs was enthousiastic about all the volumes of The Office. A pity I couldn't share this. Found it boring.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sebastiaan

    Saai. Heb niet de motivatie kunnen vinden om verder te lezen.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.