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2014 Readers' Choice Award WinnerWhen reading through the Bible, it is impossible to ignore the troubling fact that Israel and its leaders?and even Jesus' own disciples?seem unable to fully grasp the messianic identity and climactic mission of Jesus. If his true deity, his death and resurrection and his role in the establishment of God's eternal kingdom were predicted in t 2014 Readers' Choice Award WinnerWhen reading through the Bible, it is impossible to ignore the troubling fact that Israel and its leaders?and even Jesus' own disciples?seem unable to fully grasp the messianic identity and climactic mission of Jesus. If his true deity, his death and resurrection and his role in the establishment of God's eternal kingdom were predicted in the Old Testament and in his own teachings, how could the leading biblical scholars of their time miss it? This book explores the biblical conception of mystery as an initial, partially hidden revelation that is subsequently more fully revealed, shedding light not only on the richness of the concept itself, but also on the broader relationship between the Old and New Testaments. Exploring all the occurrences of the term mystery in the New Testament and the topics found in conjunction with them, this work unpacks how the New Testament writers understood the issue of continuity and discontinuity. This investigation of the notion of mystery sharpens our understanding of how the Old Testament relates to the New and explores topics such as kingdom, crucifixion, the relationship between Jews and Gentiles and more. As such, it is a model for attentive and faithful biblical theology intended for students, scholars, pastors and lay people who wish to seriously engage the Scriptures.


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2014 Readers' Choice Award WinnerWhen reading through the Bible, it is impossible to ignore the troubling fact that Israel and its leaders?and even Jesus' own disciples?seem unable to fully grasp the messianic identity and climactic mission of Jesus. If his true deity, his death and resurrection and his role in the establishment of God's eternal kingdom were predicted in t 2014 Readers' Choice Award WinnerWhen reading through the Bible, it is impossible to ignore the troubling fact that Israel and its leaders?and even Jesus' own disciples?seem unable to fully grasp the messianic identity and climactic mission of Jesus. If his true deity, his death and resurrection and his role in the establishment of God's eternal kingdom were predicted in the Old Testament and in his own teachings, how could the leading biblical scholars of their time miss it? This book explores the biblical conception of mystery as an initial, partially hidden revelation that is subsequently more fully revealed, shedding light not only on the richness of the concept itself, but also on the broader relationship between the Old and New Testaments. Exploring all the occurrences of the term mystery in the New Testament and the topics found in conjunction with them, this work unpacks how the New Testament writers understood the issue of continuity and discontinuity. This investigation of the notion of mystery sharpens our understanding of how the Old Testament relates to the New and explores topics such as kingdom, crucifixion, the relationship between Jews and Gentiles and more. As such, it is a model for attentive and faithful biblical theology intended for students, scholars, pastors and lay people who wish to seriously engage the Scriptures.

30 review for Hidden But Now Revealed: A Biblical Theology of Mystery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Abraham

    An absolutely fascinating read that has created a thirst in me for more biblical theology. I have it as an audiobook and it is perhaps too dense for such a format; I'd recommend reading it as a physical book. An absolutely fascinating read that has created a thirst in me for more biblical theology. I have it as an audiobook and it is perhaps too dense for such a format; I'd recommend reading it as a physical book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Reagan

    Are you fascinated by the concept of mystery as you encounter it in Scripture? It is important, vitally important, to understanding the big picture of Scripture itself. As I see it, mystery as a concept is the nuts and bolts of how progressive revelation works. G. K. Beale and Benjamin Gladd delve deeply into this subject in this book published by IVP, subtitled aptly “A Biblical Theology Of Mystery”. Technical enough to be the scholarly touchstone on the subject, it still is profitable for past Are you fascinated by the concept of mystery as you encounter it in Scripture? It is important, vitally important, to understanding the big picture of Scripture itself. As I see it, mystery as a concept is the nuts and bolts of how progressive revelation works. G. K. Beale and Benjamin Gladd delve deeply into this subject in this book published by IVP, subtitled aptly “A Biblical Theology Of Mystery”. Technical enough to be the scholarly touchstone on the subject, it still is profitable for pastors to grasp how the words of God progressively came to us. This answers difficult questions like why was Jesus so misunderstood when He talked about His Kingdom or His mission. It even affects how we, for example, read the Old Testament today–how we see things they did not see then. They define “mystery” as “the revelation of God’s partially hidden wisdom, particularly as it concerns events occurring in the ‘latter days'”. In the Introduction the authors establish the meaning of mystery and in the first chapter discuss how Daniel’s use of mystery is truly the foundation of the concept. Before coming to the New Testament they discuss the use of “mystery” in early Judiasm. That was not as helpful to me, yet I see why they included it. Next we have a chapter each for mystery in Matthew, Romans, 1 Corinthians, Ephesians, Colossians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, and Revelation–all the places the New Testament discusses mystery. Because of a good scriptural index, you have a lexical/commentary reference on your shelf after you read it. It is slow to read through, at least for me, yet I doubt it will even be superseded as an authority on the use of “mystery” in the Bible. I recommend it. I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Spencer R

    You can read my full review here: spoiledmilks.wordpress.com/2015/04/27... People love mysteries. Nancy Drew. The Hardy Boys. Scooby Doo. It’s part of what creates a good story. Greg Beale has a knack for taking some of the most obscure topics in the Bible and making them interesting. Here he looks at how mystery is used in the New Testament by grounding it’s meaning in the book of Daniel. Beale and Gladd cover the twenty-eight uses of the term mystery in the NT, along with explaining the meaning You can read my full review here: spoiledmilks.wordpress.com/2015/04/27... People love mysteries. Nancy Drew. The Hardy Boys. Scooby Doo. It’s part of what creates a good story. Greg Beale has a knack for taking some of the most obscure topics in the Bible and making them interesting. Here he looks at how mystery is used in the New Testament by grounding it’s meaning in the book of Daniel. Beale and Gladd cover the twenty-eight uses of the term mystery in the NT, along with explaining the meaning of mystery in Daniel, it’s subsequent interpretations in early Judaism, concepts related to mystery in the NT yet do not use the word mystery, and the relation between the Christian mystery and the pagan mystery religions. What makes mystery so complex is that sometimes the biblical authors use two definitions at the same time: “(1) God’s wisdom has been finally disclosed, but nevertheless (2) his wisdom remains generally incomprehensible to non-believers” (20). The original context for mystery comes from Daniel 2 and 4, and the authors argue that mystery “is not a radically new revelation but a disclosure of something that was largely (but not entirely) hidden” (35). Though there is some repetition at the beginning of the NT chapters (repeating the conclusions from the previous chapter), this book is highly recommended. While not written for a wide audience, Beale and Gladd are confident and convincing in their exegesis. This is a must have for those who want to know what the great “mystery” is, along with taking a glimpse into how the NT interprets the OT. [Special thanks to Christine at Think IVP for allowing me to review this book! I was not obligated to provide a positive review in exchange for this book.]

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Kennedy

    Read the full review here: http://mydigitalseminary.com/review-h... As one expects from Beale, this book is chock full of both intricate and overarching insights and repays close study. Gladd's dissertation was on mystery, so his contributions are no doubt significant. Although mystery may seem like a small topic, its implications are far-reaching and it seems like every mystery text is controversial and difficult. It takes skill to thread through such difficult issues, but the authors appear t Read the full review here: http://mydigitalseminary.com/review-h... As one expects from Beale, this book is chock full of both intricate and overarching insights and repays close study. Gladd's dissertation was on mystery, so his contributions are no doubt significant. Although mystery may seem like a small topic, its implications are far-reaching and it seems like every mystery text is controversial and difficult. It takes skill to thread through such difficult issues, but the authors appear to do it with ease. The book certainly succeeds in its goals of examining the mystery texts in detail and presenting an overarching theme that ties them together and I found it mostly convincing. I found Hidden but Now Revealed to be profoundly beneficial to my own study. There was certainly a lot of meat to chew on! The material on Ephesians was particularly rewarding, but the entire work is rich with detail and depth. Beale and Gladd manage to present a holistic and compelling understanding of mystery and, even if one disagrees with some of the details or convictions of the authors, it would be unwise to ignore this work. Hidden but Now Revealed certainly proves that mystery deserves an entire book after all! Many thanks to IVP UK for providing this book in exchange for review. Their generosity did not affect my opinions.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Hidden But Now Revealed, G. K. Beale and Benjamin L. Gladd. Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2014. Summary: A study of the word mystery in scripture, particularly considering its use in the Old Testament book of Daniel, and how nearly all New Testament usages connect back to this book, and show the once hidden but now revealed realities surrounding the person of Christ, his kingdom, and the inclusion of the Gentiles. "Mystery" means quite a number of different things, and often, when we read pas Hidden But Now Revealed, G. K. Beale and Benjamin L. Gladd. Downers Grove: InterVarsity Press, 2014. Summary: A study of the word mystery in scripture, particularly considering its use in the Old Testament book of Daniel, and how nearly all New Testament usages connect back to this book, and show the once hidden but now revealed realities surrounding the person of Christ, his kingdom, and the inclusion of the Gentiles. "Mystery" means quite a number of different things, and often, when we read passages in the Bible that refer in some way to mystery, we read those into the text. In other instances, it is the practice to read into the New Testament usage of mystery the uses of this term in the pagan religions of surrounding cultures. Beale and Gladd in this book understand mystery as something that was once hidden but had now been revealed, or will be revealed. What they do in this book is study all the instances where the word occurs in scripture, primarily in Daniel in the Old Testament, some in inter-testamental Judaism, and in the canonical New Testament books of Matthew, Romans, 1 Corinthians, Ephesians, Colossians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, and Revelation. They devote a chapter to each of these, exegeting the text, and in the case of the New Testament books, showing the echoes or connections back to Daniel in almost every use--often in parallels in word usage and meaning, as well as in the elaboration or fuller development of that meaning. Each chapter includes conclusions that summarize the biblical theology of mystery in that book. Many of the chapters also have excurses on special issues related to the text of a particular book. The final chapters consider the theme of mystery in the New Testament even where the word does not occur, the contrast between the esoteric character of pagan mystery religions and the open character of the biblical proclamation of the mysteries revealed in Christ. A conclusion then ties together the theology of mystery found throughout scripture, showing how so much was revealed in the incarnation, life, death, and resurrection and cosmic rule of the Son of God. There is the mystery of the already-not yet kingdom and the inclusion of the Gentiles. Most of all is the mystery of the cruciform work of Christ, how the victory of Christ and salvation and the conquest of Satan occurred through the death of Jesus. One of the bonuses of this book was the concluding appendix on "The Cognitive Peripheral Vision of the Biblical Authors." Have you ever noticed how some of the passages cited as prophecies of Christ, seem to mean something very different in their Old Testament context? It seems that the New Testament authors interpret these to mean something very different from what they meant in their original context. Beale and Gladd argue that this reflects a type of "peripheral vision." The contextual meaning in the Old Testament is the equivalent of the focal point in one's vision. They would contend, and show evidence from different shadings of meaning within the same Old Testament books, that authors may mean and comprehend more than their explicit intention in a particular passage, such that the appropriation of these passages by New Testament writers falls within their "cognitive peripheral vision." I'm not sure I buy it yet, but it is an intriguing idea to explore further. Overall, I thought this was an example of doing biblical theology at its best from a conviction that one may trace both continuity and discontinuity between the testaments but can look for coherence in the whole. They work from exegesis, to summary of the theology of mystery in each book of scripture, to a synthesis of the theology of mystery found in scripture as a whole. Their close, careful study requires the reader's full attention, but if followed leaves one with a new sense of the wonder of what has been revealed in the coming of Christ, as well as the glories we may yet anticipate.

  6. 4 out of 5

    J. Amill Santiago

    Not for the fainthearted. The book is deeply scholarly and dense in nature, but it has a lot of interesting and useful discussion behind the biblical usage of "mystery," particularly within the Pauline corpus. Not for the fainthearted. The book is deeply scholarly and dense in nature, but it has a lot of interesting and useful discussion behind the biblical usage of "mystery," particularly within the Pauline corpus.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    This volume evaluate the use of mystery found throughout the NT (Matthew, Romans, 1 Corinthians, Ephesians, Revelation, to name a few). Beale and Gladd illuminate this significant yet neglected biblical motif and demonstrates how it highlights both discontinuities and continuities that exist between the OT and NT. This work is invaluable for anyone that desires to grasp more deeply the biblical-theological theme of mystery and, as the reader will discover, the many ways that it is bound up with This volume evaluate the use of mystery found throughout the NT (Matthew, Romans, 1 Corinthians, Ephesians, Revelation, to name a few). Beale and Gladd illuminate this significant yet neglected biblical motif and demonstrates how it highlights both discontinuities and continuities that exist between the OT and NT. This work is invaluable for anyone that desires to grasp more deeply the biblical-theological theme of mystery and, as the reader will discover, the many ways that it is bound up with other more recognized NT themes (e.g., resurrection, reigning through suffering, conversion of Gentiles).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Locke

    Excellent biblical theology on a complicated topic. The book is surprisingly readable, though his excurses at the end of each chapter dive into some pretty confusing weeds. Definitely a book I'd like to revisit in the future. Excellent biblical theology on a complicated topic. The book is surprisingly readable, though his excurses at the end of each chapter dive into some pretty confusing weeds. Definitely a book I'd like to revisit in the future.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Kight

    G.K. Beale is known for his unique ability to examine and synthesize biblical themes across canonical lines. He has published numerous volumes focused on biblical theology and the use of the Old Testament in the New. However, the present volume co-authored with Benjamin L. Gladd, Hidden But Now Revealed: A Biblical Theology of Mystery rightly positions itself as one of the more unique works in the growing corpus of Beale’s thematic explorations. Hidden But Now Revealed opens with an imperative f G.K. Beale is known for his unique ability to examine and synthesize biblical themes across canonical lines. He has published numerous volumes focused on biblical theology and the use of the Old Testament in the New. However, the present volume co-authored with Benjamin L. Gladd, Hidden But Now Revealed: A Biblical Theology of Mystery rightly positions itself as one of the more unique works in the growing corpus of Beale’s thematic explorations. Hidden But Now Revealed opens with an imperative first chapter. It is here that Beale and Gladd firmly establish the roots of the theme of mystery in the book of Daniel—specifically Daniel 2 and 4, although, as the reader will see, the theme is found elsewhere in Daniel as well (Daniel 5, 7-12). Thus, Daniel becomes a type of thematic launchpad with which Beale and Gladd inaugurate nearly all subsequent usages or allusions of the biblical theme of mystery. Beale and Gladd describe a revelation of a mystery as, “God fully disclosing wisdom about end-times events that are mostly hitherto unknown . . . [it] signals the hidden nature of revelation and its subsequent interpretation” (p. 46). In other words, a mystery was once partially hidden in one form or another but has now been more fully revealed. Consequently, while there may be cases of revealed mystery in the Old Testament, the majority of the investigation inevitably rests in the New. As the book unfolds, Beale and Gladd guide the reader through early Judaism and into the writings of the New Testament. The reader is accompanied in a carefully and detailed investigation of every occurrence of mystery from Matthew to Revelation, and then challenged to see the whole picture in light of that established in the first chapter. Apart from the content of each of the chapters, Beale and Gladd provide a number of related excursus materials to launch further insight. I opened this review alluding to the fact that this was one of the more unique works that I have read by Beale. This is not because there is anything uncharacteristic about the book that one would not expect from Beale, quite the opposite. Rather, it displays Beale’s unique ability to observe the whole of Scripture in relation to the various parts more than some of his other works. Beale has taken a seemingly mysterious (pun intended) biblical theme, displayed the interconnectedness between the Old Testament and the New, and carefully guided the reader to the practical end of understanding and application. The usefulness of biblical theology to the ongoing interdisciplinary interaction between the fields of biblical studies, theology, and hermeneutics is undeniable. While there is certainly a number of difficulties that will inevitably arise when trying to synthesize a single theme across the biblical canon, the profit of such pursuit will always outweigh the loss. Still, the insights to be unearthed from this book are numerous, and Beale and Gladd provide unparalleled guidance therein. If you are in the market for a comprehensive journey into the biblical theme of mystery and its implications on the Christian life, you will not find anything better on the shelf than Hidden But Now Revealed: A Biblical Theology of Mystery by G. K. Beale and Benjamin L. Gladd. It is rich with interpretive insight and deep in practical significance, and thus comes highly recommended! I received a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Mystery is an important subtheme in the Bible. The Gnostics, who lived in the early years of the church, were obsessed with secret, esoteric knowledge that was only available to the few who had these special truths made available to them. Even today some Christians think there are truths from God that are only disclosed to a select few. That’s not what a mystery is in the Bible, however. In Hidden But Now Revealed Beale and Gladd affirm what has been pointed out by many before—that a mystery in t Mystery is an important subtheme in the Bible. The Gnostics, who lived in the early years of the church, were obsessed with secret, esoteric knowledge that was only available to the few who had these special truths made available to them. Even today some Christians think there are truths from God that are only disclosed to a select few. That’s not what a mystery is in the Bible, however. In Hidden But Now Revealed Beale and Gladd affirm what has been pointed out by many before—that a mystery in the Bible is something that is revealed, not something that remains hidden. But their careful study of every occurrence of mystery in the Bible reveals some important clarifications. First, an explanation of a mystery isn’t a totally new revelation but the full disclosure of something that had been known partially. So when Paul or others use the term about Christ or his work, they affirm that all this was already in the Old Testament, though in seed form. Who Jesus was and what he did was surprising, but not a complete surprise. Second, a mystery always has to do with the latter days (though not necessarily the final end of all things). These involve times of distress, the restoration of Israel, and a ruler who ushers in a kingdom of peace for Israel and all nations. And Jesus is the one who has launched these latter days. Third, this advent of a new age often comes in stages. This is the already-not-yet dimension of the kingdom with some aspects already in place by virtue of Christ’s cross and resurrection, though they are not yet all fully realized. The wheat and the weeds grow side by side in this in-between state of the world. So when Jesus speaks of the secret (mystērion) of the kingdom, we should ask, What was partially revealed in the Old Testament about the kingdom? That in the latter days God will establish his kingdom by routing his enemies and those of Israel, and that a son of David will be a key figure in this victory. What then is now being more fully revealed to the disciples? That Jesus is the one who is inaugurating these last days. And in addition, that this victory will not come as expected. First, it will have an unanticipated time frame. Victory for God’s people will not be complete and instantaneous. It will come in stages, in fits and starts. It is already but not yet. Second, the true enemy who will be vanquished is unexpected--not other nations but the Satan. And third, as we see especially in Mark’s gospel, it will be achieved by unexpected means—not through a triumphal conquest but through suffering. Beale and Gladd finally put forward a tentative proposal that this rubric of mystery can possibly be used more broadly than just where the word itself appears. Mystery can help us understand how concepts partially hidden in the Old Testament are more fully revealed in the New Testament—concepts like resurrection, the new creation and the gospel itself. Here is a worthy book for those wanting a more in-depth look at some of the knottier passages in the Bible and how the two Testaments often work together.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sherif Gendy

    In this book, G. K. Beale and Benjamin L. Gladd trace the occurrences of the term mystery to define it with its uses in the Old and New Testaments and to grasp its significance. They articulate biblical topics that are found in conjunction with the term mystery. Starting with the background of mystery in the book of Daniel, the authors unpack inner-biblical allusions and intertextual relationship between the Old and New Testaments, highlighting areas of continuity and discontinuity. They also lo In this book, G. K. Beale and Benjamin L. Gladd trace the occurrences of the term mystery to define it with its uses in the Old and New Testaments and to grasp its significance. They articulate biblical topics that are found in conjunction with the term mystery. Starting with the background of mystery in the book of Daniel, the authors unpack inner-biblical allusions and intertextual relationship between the Old and New Testaments, highlighting areas of continuity and discontinuity. They also look at how the concept of mystery is used in early Jewish writings. They define mystery as the revelation of God’s partially hidden wisdom, particularly as it concerns events occurring in the “latter days.” The authors identify nine occurrences of mystery in the book of Daniel and twenty-eight in the New Testament. They discuss each occurrence and pay close attention to the surrounding allusions to unlock the content of the revealed mystery. Their study shows how the New Testament incorporates Old Testament themes but expresses... View more on Sherif's blog » https://arabishbiblicaltheology.wordp...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Alvers

    I really enjoyed this work on mystery and feel great giving my recommendation. It may not be the easiest introduction to a Biblical theology for those just starting out. It a very focused work none the less. However, I feel like this may be the best way to break some eschatology scales to the popular dispensational era. This is definitely more for those thinking deeply about interpretation, teaching and preaching God's word. It's a fantastic helpful work on putting together the whole Bible aroun I really enjoyed this work on mystery and feel great giving my recommendation. It may not be the easiest introduction to a Biblical theology for those just starting out. It a very focused work none the less. However, I feel like this may be the best way to break some eschatology scales to the popular dispensational era. This is definitely more for those thinking deeply about interpretation, teaching and preaching God's word. It's a fantastic helpful work on putting together the whole Bible around the terms surrounding "mystery" and tensions related to that word. It would be interesting to hear some disagreement from scholars who may have something else to put forward. Whoever they are, they will have to get up early in the morning for that discussion.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Nichols

    Mystery revealed I thoroughly enjoyed this walk through the Scriptures as the authors discussed the meaning and application of the term mystery in the Bible. Many find excuses to disregard much of what the Bible says because they think it is hidden and mysterious, but to the child of God who has the "Author" living inside of him, the unfolding and revealing of the plan of God through the analogy of faith is an amazing and profitable journey and one we can see and understand Mystery revealed I thoroughly enjoyed this walk through the Scriptures as the authors discussed the meaning and application of the term mystery in the Bible. Many find excuses to disregard much of what the Bible says because they think it is hidden and mysterious, but to the child of God who has the "Author" living inside of him, the unfolding and revealing of the plan of God through the analogy of faith is an amazing and profitable journey and one we can see and understand

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Audible audio book. Good narrator. Great material. Probably get more out of it in book form.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Guillaume Bourin

    Theological analysis of the concept of "mystery" from a redemptive-historical approach. Love the chapter on Romans. Theological analysis of the concept of "mystery" from a redemptive-historical approach. Love the chapter on Romans.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jotham

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  18. 4 out of 5

    David

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jerald Downs

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jake

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Kakish

  22. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Anderson

  23. 4 out of 5

    Robert Boylan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rusty

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark Mcconnell

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barry Ickes

  27. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Pandolph

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ur Salem

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tom Clawser

  30. 4 out of 5

    David

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