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After completing her first year of learning magic at Whitehall School, Emily accepts an invitation from Princess Alassa to accompany her on her progress back to her home country of Zangaria, where the princess may meet her future husband. Alassa, who was a spoiled brat before she met Emily, wants to show off her friend – and impress potential suitors. For Emily, it is a ch After completing her first year of learning magic at Whitehall School, Emily accepts an invitation from Princess Alassa to accompany her on her progress back to her home country of Zangaria, where the princess may meet her future husband. Alassa, who was a spoiled brat before she met Emily, wants to show off her friend – and impress potential suitors. For Emily, it is a chance to relax and explore a world very different to Earth, meet new people and come to terms with her reputation in the Nameless World. After her defeat of Shadye, everyone wants to know her, to talk with her, to kill her ... or to marry her. For Emily, hardly a social butterfly, the experience is disconcerting. She was never seriously courted before, not on Earth. And yet, as she sees more of the countries surrounding Whitehall, she feels more and more out of place. The locals come from a very different culture, one that is often strange and horrifying to her eyes. Even her friends seem different people in their homes. But dark forces are at work, plotting to capture the princess, take power in Zangaria ... and undo all of Emily's work. As all hell breaks loose, Emily may be all that stands between Zangaria and a return to the dark ages of brute force that threatened to lay the kingdom low, once before. And if she fails, her friends will be just the first victims of a war that will rip the Allied Lands apart.


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After completing her first year of learning magic at Whitehall School, Emily accepts an invitation from Princess Alassa to accompany her on her progress back to her home country of Zangaria, where the princess may meet her future husband. Alassa, who was a spoiled brat before she met Emily, wants to show off her friend – and impress potential suitors. For Emily, it is a ch After completing her first year of learning magic at Whitehall School, Emily accepts an invitation from Princess Alassa to accompany her on her progress back to her home country of Zangaria, where the princess may meet her future husband. Alassa, who was a spoiled brat before she met Emily, wants to show off her friend – and impress potential suitors. For Emily, it is a chance to relax and explore a world very different to Earth, meet new people and come to terms with her reputation in the Nameless World. After her defeat of Shadye, everyone wants to know her, to talk with her, to kill her ... or to marry her. For Emily, hardly a social butterfly, the experience is disconcerting. She was never seriously courted before, not on Earth. And yet, as she sees more of the countries surrounding Whitehall, she feels more and more out of place. The locals come from a very different culture, one that is often strange and horrifying to her eyes. Even her friends seem different people in their homes. But dark forces are at work, plotting to capture the princess, take power in Zangaria ... and undo all of Emily's work. As all hell breaks loose, Emily may be all that stands between Zangaria and a return to the dark ages of brute force that threatened to lay the kingdom low, once before. And if she fails, her friends will be just the first victims of a war that will rip the Allied Lands apart.

30 review for Lessons In Etiquette

  1. 5 out of 5

    M.L.

    Because of a very annoying friend who insisted I read book 2 and going as far as gifting me this book, I decided. Why not. I'm glad to inform you, this friend was the same friend that recommended another very bad book, I have decided I will not even open a single book she reads. I will cross my arms, close my eyes and start chanting lalalallalsl until she gives up. You want to know what it was that made this book bad, like hammering nails into you skull bad? It was the constant babbling. Everythi Because of a very annoying friend who insisted I read book 2 and going as far as gifting me this book, I decided. Why not. I'm glad to inform you, this friend was the same friend that recommended another very bad book, I have decided I will not even open a single book she reads. I will cross my arms, close my eyes and start chanting lalalallalsl until she gives up. You want to know what it was that made this book bad, like hammering nails into you skull bad? It was the constant babbling. Everything was repeated over and over again. Seriously, how many fucking times do we have to be told, how disastrous it would be for Emily to try to influence the current world and turn it into her world I mean, because of her, Robin Hood and his merry men will be arrive on the L train. And how many time will a conversation be paused for it to move past a simple answer. Seriously, the dialogue is like this. "No" Emily said. I will not kill an innocent person!" Page (literally a full page inside Emily's internal rambling) Page ( more rambling) "He is not innocent!" Lady Barb replied. "He murdered six men and a girl" Page (internal babbling) Page (internal babbling) Page (Emily kills a man) Page (internal babbling . I had to kill the man following me. Yes. I did not know why he was following me. But let me cut his head off and not ask him) "How can a human be so cruel?" Emily whimpered. "Of course, it was cruel and unusual punishment and that needs to change. My world is so much better." Page (internal babbling) Page (repeat babbling from a few pages back) Page (re peat babbling from the start of the book) See where I'm going with this? Just drop it. The first book was just like this one. A part of me, the one who has read the first book of a sucky book only to read the second part and find out the author had improved, expected improvisation. There was none. Too bad too, it would have been good if it wasn't a Harry Potter knock off. And didn't have repeat page fillers. Seriously, maybe around thirty times were we told the same shit. And maybe fifty times were we given description that were really descriptions. (See below for example) There was some sort of animal nibbling on a a long needle of green and wheat colored grass. The animal had a long snot, with black eyes, four long legs. It reminded Emily of a deer, with a long snot, black eyes, four legs and antlers. And the animal in front of Emily had antlers too but they were longer, like branches lifting up to the sky in alll directions. Hello, it's a fucking deer, okay. (I should warn, she wasn't really talking about a deer but a boar, but even as my description was lacking, it was still better than the shit described here. God! And it was a long book too, shit. I waisted 7 hours l for my iPhone to read this for me and shit. I would have preferred I spent those 7 hours watching paint dry or cows mating then reading this shit!!!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jay Collins

    So, much like the first book, I liked it but not original and he is still using things from other books and not his own ideas. He even uses quotes that some will miss (I am sure I have missed stuff) New ideas are like a new born baby is a well know quote but he using it like it was his own idea (Faraday and Franlkin's "New born Baby"). I like the story in these books but I do get upset with the common use of others ideas. I am sure a lot of authors do this to some degree but this is the worst ca So, much like the first book, I liked it but not original and he is still using things from other books and not his own ideas. He even uses quotes that some will miss (I am sure I have missed stuff) New ideas are like a new born baby is a well know quote but he using it like it was his own idea (Faraday and Franlkin's "New born Baby"). I like the story in these books but I do get upset with the common use of others ideas. I am sure a lot of authors do this to some degree but this is the worst cause I have ever read. With all that said sadly over all I like the story and will continue with the series. I guess I am just a sucker for this type of story and no matter how I dislike those parts of the books I still love the main story and character.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steven Naylor

    Rating 3.0 stars I am on the fence with this series. I like it, but there are a bunch of things that I have noticed that aren't my favorite. Not quite at the point of getting on my nerves but it could happen real quick. The story itself is pretty simple. After her first year at School, Emily is going to visit Alyssa's family. This is an important trip for Alyssa as she is going to be made the heir to the throne (that couldn't be done until she turned 17). They have to stop at a bunch of kingdom Rating 3.0 stars I am on the fence with this series. I like it, but there are a bunch of things that I have noticed that aren't my favorite. Not quite at the point of getting on my nerves but it could happen real quick. The story itself is pretty simple. After her first year at School, Emily is going to visit Alyssa's family. This is an important trip for Alyssa as she is going to be made the heir to the throne (that couldn't be done until she turned 17). They have to stop at a bunch of kingdoms on the way and Alyssa will have to deal with suitors who will want to marry her. It won't be easy since Alyssa is still considered a brat from the way she acted up until she met Emily. Emily also has problems. She defeated the necromancer and no one knows how. Everyone wants her secrets and not a few people in power are pissed off that she has brought so many dangerous ideas to the land. I do like the brought to another world and use the knowledge from the previous world stories. I find it a little hard to believe with Emily though. She is 16 years old I think and the story goes that on earth she was something of a bookworm, but I remember her mentioning she wasn't that smart (or she didn't do that great in school - or something like that). When I think of a bookworm, I think of someone who is really into literature. Being a bookworm, doesn't always translate into someone being smart (or at least scholarly). In this story though, she remembered the process of how to make steel, and the chemical formula for gunpowder. There was also a line how she couldn't quite remember how to mass produce glass (What was she a glassblower on earth, why would she know this information?). So her telling me she was a bookworm, doesn't make me believe she knows all this information. It also seems like she is an expert of the aristocrats in Europe. It was like Emily was giving a book report of Mary Queen of Scot or Charles I, or Queen Elizabeth. She seemed to know the exact political climate that led to each persons rule and how it affected their kingdom. Was she a professor of European History? There is no way any 16 year old should know that ( at least not in that much detail) unless they had an eidetic memory or were a genius. As far as the writing style, I noticed a few things. First, there wasn't much dialog. There might of been one or 2 sentences of dialog followed by 3-4 pages of internal monologue (mainly explaining in excruciating detail all the political, social, environmental, or humanitarian implications of the current situation). Emily also repeated herself over and over again. Yes, Emily I get why it would be bad for people to know how you killed the necromancer, I don't need to hear it again. I read the first book, I don't need a recap every chapter. Another thing that is holding me back from really liking this story is that I don't think I am the target demographic. While I find the story interesting, I just can't relate to a 16 year old girl. What Emily is going through is interesting, but it hasn't resonated with me like other characters. I think this is going to be one of those series where I read a book and then put it down for a while and then much later read the next. I have the next book in the series but I am going to wait to read it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rick Stuckwisch

    I found this second book in the series to be even more interesting and engaging than the first. The superficial and structural similarities to Harry Potter, which were so prominent in the first book, are all but absent in the second, although the continuity and integrity of the series is absolutely preserved. Whereas the first book (and the Harry Potter series) could be said to explore and investigate the "politics" of school and friendship, this second book in Christopher Nuttall's series deals I found this second book in the series to be even more interesting and engaging than the first. The superficial and structural similarities to Harry Potter, which were so prominent in the first book, are all but absent in the second, although the continuity and integrity of the series is absolutely preserved. Whereas the first book (and the Harry Potter series) could be said to explore and investigate the "politics" of school and friendship, this second book in Christopher Nuttall's series deals with actual politics, economics, the impact of technological advances on culture and society, and the contours of history on a broad scale. There is a moderate "feminist critique" the underlies the series (albeit the author is a male, but the main protagonist, from whose perspective the story is told, is female); but it is mild, and not altogether out of place given the setting within what is more or less a medieval society. I did not encounter anything blatantly offensive, although there were times I had to roll my eyes. The author does enter into a kind of dialogue with the pros and cons between a "medieval" and "modern" way of approaching and dealing with things, including etiquette, protocol, courtship and marriage. The story itself is well crafted, thoughtful, and entertaining. I would classify this book, in particular, as "Young Adult" literature, and not as Children's literature. There's nothing scandalous or gratuitous, but it does deal with some material that wouldn't be appropriate for younger readers or listeners. (This is not a book that I'm reading to my young listeners, but one that I'm reading for my own enjoyment, especially as I ride my exercise bike.) I'm eager to see where the story goes from this point in the next installment. So far, I'd recommend the series as a good read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Soo

    Mini-Review: The narrator does not sound like a young girl. Which makes it unfortunate that she is narrating a series about a young girl growing into a woman. Downfall of audio vs print: It is agonizingly hard to ignore repetitive dialogue (mental or otherwise) and narrative. Pretty sure 1/4 of the book could be easily cut and not affect the book in a negative manner. I have a hard time believing the level of detail and information that Emily recalls about Earth and it's history. She is not portr Mini-Review: The narrator does not sound like a young girl. Which makes it unfortunate that she is narrating a series about a young girl growing into a woman. Downfall of audio vs print: It is agonizingly hard to ignore repetitive dialogue (mental or otherwise) and narrative. Pretty sure 1/4 of the book could be easily cut and not affect the book in a negative manner. I have a hard time believing the level of detail and information that Emily recalls about Earth and it's history. She is not portrayed as a super smart girl and yet has super amazing powers. Hmmm. The implementations of Earth science into this magic world is super hard to swallow. I may be too old to enjoy this series. Ha! Everything about Emily is awkward. That can be endearing but if you bludgeon the reader with that over and over again... I dub this as a lame filler story that should have been a 100 paged novella. Going to try out book three before I give up on the series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jim Arona

    It seems Mr Nuttall has very little respect for his readers. He always seems to revisit a character's motivations. Acceptable if he were refreshing a reader's memory between books. Otherwise, it indicates limited ability to edit effectively. Time travel science fiction, and I guess crossover realm fantasy, is fertile ground for sowing the author's particular political position. It would be nice, however, if the author's opinion were mature and intelligent, rather than the Trump-like libertarian o It seems Mr Nuttall has very little respect for his readers. He always seems to revisit a character's motivations. Acceptable if he were refreshing a reader's memory between books. Otherwise, it indicates limited ability to edit effectively. Time travel science fiction, and I guess crossover realm fantasy, is fertile ground for sowing the author's particular political position. It would be nice, however, if the author's opinion were mature and intelligent, rather than the Trump-like libertarian one sees too much of already. Also, the author cannot resist telling readers how fair-minded he is about women's rights. In short, the story is average, the thematic content is clumsy, adolescent and embarrasing.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hollyberye

    Wonderfully crafted and a much welcome sequel to Schooled in Magic. I gave it four stars instead of five only because I was not as obsessively absorbed in it and I try to be a little stingy with five stars (though I re-read a lot of favorite books so still have plenty out there). I look forward to the return to Whitehall, though, in book three. I applaud the marvelous author, Christopher G. Nuttall. I feel as though I have discovered another Diana Wynne Jones, Mercedes Lackey, or Lois McMaster B Wonderfully crafted and a much welcome sequel to Schooled in Magic. I gave it four stars instead of five only because I was not as obsessively absorbed in it and I try to be a little stingy with five stars (though I re-read a lot of favorite books so still have plenty out there). I look forward to the return to Whitehall, though, in book three. I applaud the marvelous author, Christopher G. Nuttall. I feel as though I have discovered another Diana Wynne Jones, Mercedes Lackey, or Lois McMaster Bujold. That is a huge complement to the author.

  8. 4 out of 5

    M.L.

    This book was just as enjoyable as the previous book. While I might have some things to quibble about introducing certain technological advancements, it's not really that big of a deal yet. Hopefully this won't get off the rails entirely in the next books. This book was just as enjoyable as the previous book. While I might have some things to quibble about introducing certain technological advancements, it's not really that big of a deal yet. Hopefully this won't get off the rails entirely in the next books.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Atousa Karimi

    One of the most disgusting and stupidest protagonist of all the history of fantasy.🤢

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hairculle

    QUALITY

  11. 5 out of 5

    Naj

    I jumped into the second book of Schooled in Magic with hopes of some changes in story delivery. But no, the writer is hung up on taking his time to describe things that seem irrelevant to the story progression (especially things that he'd already written in before). Some of the passages leave me very annoyed. Such as, in the last few chapters when Emily was presented something that shocked her, Emily basically gave an in depth analysis as to the intention and result of receiving the 'present' an I jumped into the second book of Schooled in Magic with hopes of some changes in story delivery. But no, the writer is hung up on taking his time to describe things that seem irrelevant to the story progression (especially things that he'd already written in before). Some of the passages leave me very annoyed. Such as, in the last few chapters when Emily was presented something that shocked her, Emily basically gave an in depth analysis as to the intention and result of receiving the 'present' and then there'd be a sentence saying something like 'but I don't have time to think of such things'. Girl! You just presented a dissertation on it, whaddya mean you don't have time to think of it?? And what about all the time people seem to sneak up on her and Emily saying she never even felt his/her presence nearby. Seriously - when does she ever notice the presence of people approaching her? (I do not include Void in this generalization.) The supposed 'dislike' Lady Barb had of Emily just because of her association with Void. I could see no proof of this dislike seeing as Lady Barb seemed to have taken Emily's development in hand by teaching her the ways of the world and with her magic. How can anyone say Lady Barb really dislikes her after all the effort put into actually helping her? And yet Emily confronts Lady Barb towards the end of the story? What kind of narrow-minded person is the MC?? If Emily is one that can make an accurate analysis of situations the moment it presents itself, then she must be the villain in this story. Because, if she's so capable of seeing the results of her actions or inactions, then the resulting chaos caused by her actions must be her fault. She is the bad guy! The end of the story made me even more sure that this character is a hypocritical, selfish brat that is the villain in her own story. I've already bought the 3rd book on audible and am regretting it. I'll just shelve this for now.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Lessons in Etiquette takes place during the summer break, before Emily's second year at Whitehall [this book's equivalent to Hogwarts]. In this second book, Emily starts running into the consequences of the "inventions" she introduced into this medieval culture during the first book. Yes, Arabic numerals are MUCH easier to deal with than Roman numbers but this change has now destroyed the world's Accounting Guild (which previously had a monopoly on all finance, including bookkeeping). Some peo Lessons in Etiquette takes place during the summer break, before Emily's second year at Whitehall [this book's equivalent to Hogwarts]. In this second book, Emily starts running into the consequences of the "inventions" she introduced into this medieval culture during the first book. Yes, Arabic numerals are MUCH easier to deal with than Roman numbers but this change has now destroyed the world's Accounting Guild (which previously had a monopoly on all finance, including bookkeeping). Some people have benefited from Emily's ideas (such as the merchant class) but the aristocracy (the barons in particular) feel rightly threatened. Emily has been invited to accompany her good friend Alassa to the latter's formal Confirmation as her kingdom's Crown Princess (heir to the throne). Also, since Alassa is female, she is expected to get engaged soon to a prince from one of the other kingdoms. Emily and Alassa visit some 12 such kingdoms during the journey home to Alassa's kingdom. At each stop, one or more eligible princes from that kingdom join the entourage. (And no, Alassa doesn't get to pick her prince. She will marry whosoever her father the King chooses.) So we get a fairly good view of the medieval society in this book. In particular, Emily meets Lady Barb who is accompanying Emily and Alassa home. Lady Barb is a full-grown combat sorcerer, sent along as their protector. Lady Barb is able to tutor Emily in much-needed personal combat skills, in this case magical spells beyond what Emily learned in her first year of Martial Magic. Lady Barb is an excellent role model for Emily and adds much to book two. Again, this series continues to be action-packed and hard to put down. Highly recommended for those of us who enjoy character-driven urban fantasy!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    There is so much room for development in this second novel of the series, unfortunately the author never feels the need to truly expand on his ideas and develop his characters. We read again and again how Emily's introduction of new concepts and technologies has disrupted the social order and upset old structures. She is repeatedly upbraided for it and the reader is subjected to her self-recrimiations without gaining any better understanding of what exactly everyone is complaining about. The part There is so much room for development in this second novel of the series, unfortunately the author never feels the need to truly expand on his ideas and develop his characters. We read again and again how Emily's introduction of new concepts and technologies has disrupted the social order and upset old structures. She is repeatedly upbraided for it and the reader is subjected to her self-recrimiations without gaining any better understanding of what exactly everyone is complaining about. The particulars of the economic and social changes in Zangaria are barely touched upon. It is mostly the general fact of rapid change that is mentioned without describing how this affects our narrative world. Similarly, the hints we received in the last book on the merging of magic and scientific concepts of modern physics to create new spells and magical effects are left frustratingly vague even though Emily dwells on their potential danger. Despite her use of new spells during the rescue of her friend the reader is left without any information on the limitations, the methods implemented and what problems she had to solve. It simply appears self-contained and ready for use. The same lack of proper introduction and development is apparent in her characters. Even important characters like the protagonist's two friends remain curiously flat. Others which become important for the plot are never more than some short line of dialogue accompanied by even shorter physical descriptions and some clichéd character traits. The reader is never encouraged to develop any kind of empathy for them. Even while describing the reality of medieval life and sanitary problems the physical world the characters inhabit remains mostly remote without an immersive effect, the senses fail to be enganged, the reader remains detached. The basic ideas for a great fantasy story are there, time to flesh them out. The magic system needs a more solid grounding with governing rules and limitations, the personal interactions of the characters need more depth and the social and economic background need some more detail.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Debner

    Hard book to rate because the author essentially tells too much of the story from the MC's point of view and the MC doesn't know what's going on. The MC heads to the kingdom of her friend, the princess. Some assassination attempts are made along the way so the MC knows something is up but not what. SPOILER (although I think I may have enjoyed the book more if this part of the story hadn't been hidden): It turns out there is a long running scheme to usurp/control the throne. Had about half this b Hard book to rate because the author essentially tells too much of the story from the MC's point of view and the MC doesn't know what's going on. The MC heads to the kingdom of her friend, the princess. Some assassination attempts are made along the way so the MC knows something is up but not what. SPOILER (although I think I may have enjoyed the book more if this part of the story hadn't been hidden): It turns out there is a long running scheme to usurp/control the throne. Had about half this book been told from the bad guy's point of view this would have been a better book. As it stands it seems fairly inconceivable that such a vast conspiracy could get as far as it did. It essentially involved dozens of people since multiple barons and their families were involved. How incompetent is this king that over a dozen years he gets no clue as to a conspiracy involving so many people? Plus the story uses contradictions that aren't really resolved since we don't have the villains side of the story. For example, the villains only succeed because they use blood magic to control a person who is supposed to be immune to that kind of control. So was that person not actually immune? Did the bad guys discover a work around? There is also the MC's amazing ability to learn things. In truth this is a common convenience of stories about magic students- they pretty much always have learned just the the thing they need to win the day, even though it was never mentioned previously. Still, it seemed fairly pronounced here. Bottom line: The author tells the story he chose to tell pretty well, which is why I'm giving this book 3 stars, but when I think about how good this story would have been with a well written bad guy's point of view, I want to give it 1 star.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I liked this more than the first book. I liked the characters and the plot, but I still had a few issues: I could have understood Emily's horror at eating rabbit if she had had a pet one, but there is no suggestion of that, and comparing it to eating cats, dogs or insects is weird. The author comes originally from Scotland where rabbits are eaten as much as they are in the rest of the UK. Then there is the thing about banks not charging fees - I don't know where on Earth such banks exist, but unl I liked this more than the first book. I liked the characters and the plot, but I still had a few issues: I could have understood Emily's horror at eating rabbit if she had had a pet one, but there is no suggestion of that, and comparing it to eating cats, dogs or insects is weird. The author comes originally from Scotland where rabbits are eaten as much as they are in the rest of the UK. Then there is the thing about banks not charging fees - I don't know where on Earth such banks exist, but unless they expect regular government bail-outs, they are headed for trouble. There were several other points, all trivial, but adding up to an irritation, but the most annoying thing was the repetition. Oh, I forgot: he has a thing about "English letters" being easy to learn. However crazy the local alphabet is, it can't be as bad as our "English" version of the Roman alphabet where a large number of the letters have several different sounds and often the same sound has two or more different spellings, and that's not counting silent letters. A quick look at the Internet soon reminds you how many English speakers can't spell using our "English letters".

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vroom

    So what do you do for volume 2 of Hogwarts? You leave school. Entirely. For the complete book. And you make your lead a moron. There was enough in here for "it was okay", but the world and politics bore me and the stupid naivety of the protagonist got on my nerves. I actually liked the dubiously unethical mentor. That I did so, given the absolutely horrible way he acts, shows the paucity of story in the rest of the book. Blah blah politics princesses gunpowder royal weddings etc. By the way, if you So what do you do for volume 2 of Hogwarts? You leave school. Entirely. For the complete book. And you make your lead a moron. There was enough in here for "it was okay", but the world and politics bore me and the stupid naivety of the protagonist got on my nerves. I actually liked the dubiously unethical mentor. That I did so, given the absolutely horrible way he acts, shows the paucity of story in the rest of the book. Blah blah politics princesses gunpowder royal weddings etc. By the way, if you're not going to make a political alliance, just marry someone local and without title to win the populace to your side and ensure the spouse won't be looking to overthrow you. Idiot princess needs to marry Kate Middleton.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christian Jeffress

    Enjoyable Another enjoyable read that I thoroughly enjoyed. Though I am leery of the new possible innovation introduced at the end of the book and worry about the consequences it could bring about later. Though overall, outside that one instance I mentioned, I think the main character is doing her best to help her new world with Innovations brought from her old world. She’s a hard worker, gives good advice and she can, and is very loyal to her friends. Very good main character overall.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Steinhoff

    Far superior to the first book. Less Harriet Potter and more development of the world and characters. Fast pace despite being more a low key book of politics and court fencing. A bit of action and it's enjoyable. It takes place shortly after the first book and this is less about Emily bringing changes to the world and more about her learning what it means to be a Princess and what royal responsibilities and dangers can be. Very enjoyable and a great expansion on what was presented in the first book Far superior to the first book. Less Harriet Potter and more development of the world and characters. Fast pace despite being more a low key book of politics and court fencing. A bit of action and it's enjoyable. It takes place shortly after the first book and this is less about Emily bringing changes to the world and more about her learning what it means to be a Princess and what royal responsibilities and dangers can be. Very enjoyable and a great expansion on what was presented in the first book. Definitely check it out if you liked the first.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Why did I do this...? The first was horrible. Why did I read the second? I blame covid. Each book seems worse than the last. I suppose I am a literary masochist. But I am mildly tempted to read the third. Don’t do it... there are over twenty of these books. Twenty?! How?! I mean this guy has been published over twenty times... wow. Wow. Ok. Yep. I can’t fully wrap my head around that. I am drawn to read the rest because I am really having a hard time believing that he could continue to get publi Why did I do this...? The first was horrible. Why did I read the second? I blame covid. Each book seems worse than the last. I suppose I am a literary masochist. But I am mildly tempted to read the third. Don’t do it... there are over twenty of these books. Twenty?! How?! I mean this guy has been published over twenty times... wow. Wow. Ok. Yep. I can’t fully wrap my head around that. I am drawn to read the rest because I am really having a hard time believing that he could continue to get published while writing this... stuff. Twenty.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maikel

    An interesting story with enough going on to be entertained. Major turn down was a lack of eloquence. There seems to be only a very limited pool of adjectives for Nuttall to choose from, which led to some exasperation half way through the novel... I'd still recommend it to anyone who liked the first book and is looking for an easy, quick read. An interesting story with enough going on to be entertained. Major turn down was a lack of eloquence. There seems to be only a very limited pool of adjectives for Nuttall to choose from, which led to some exasperation half way through the novel... I'd still recommend it to anyone who liked the first book and is looking for an easy, quick read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ruby Ridge

    Nicely follows on from book #1, where we are introduced to the main characters, and gets into world building and the social system. It is good that Christopher Nuttall has a lot of titles in this series and can give detailed descriptions. Best of all - No Romance (an automatic extra star). Loving the series but like the m/c finding the misogyny a bit hard to handle.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    It was really entertaining, and light to binge. I honestly didn’t except to enjoy this so much, and now I really wanna buy the next book and I’m too broke to purchase the audible :’( I think the audible was really great, I highly highly recommend you try the audio version!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wolkenfels

    The world starts to fill out a bit better, we get a lesson in politics and the series definitely develops some own charm beyond "magician school". Still lots of room for improvement but I would say that there is a clear positive trend. The world starts to fill out a bit better, we get a lesson in politics and the series definitely develops some own charm beyond "magician school". Still lots of room for improvement but I would say that there is a clear positive trend.

  24. 5 out of 5

    David Murray

    Emily is an amazing character. The author has managed to weave a great fast paced story, with drama, action and a bit of earth history & social issues added in to help Emily to understand what is happening around her.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mayerike Coulibaly

    this book is getting good and good and good.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anadia-chan Anadia-chan

    Not a horrible book, but not all that great either. The first book wasn't half bad, but this one really just made me bored and I won't be reading past this book. Not a horrible book, but not all that great either. The first book wasn't half bad, but this one really just made me bored and I won't be reading past this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shereen Lang

    Slowly getting better than book 1

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ronny

    Pretty ok book, some nitpicks, like while calling the numbers arabic, they call the letters English and not latin (as I said, nitpicks). Entertaining book (if a bit repetitive on some details)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rosina Rushen

    Great book to read Great book continues the story with surprises and twists. I can't wait to find out if Emily will ever go back to Earth? Great book to read Great book continues the story with surprises and twists. I can't wait to find out if Emily will ever go back to Earth?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Still keep my interest. It’s an easy read so I am able to listen while I work.

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