web site hit counter 富江―The complete comics of Tomie - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

富江―The complete comics of Tomie

Availability: Ready to download

The complete classic horror series, now available in a single deluxe volume. Murdered again and again, one girl always comes back for more... Tomie Kawakami is a femme fatale with long black hair and a beauty mark just under her left eye. She can seduce nearly any man, and drive them to murder as well, even though the victim is often Tomie herself. While one lover seeks to The complete classic horror series, now available in a single deluxe volume. Murdered again and again, one girl always comes back for more... Tomie Kawakami is a femme fatale with long black hair and a beauty mark just under her left eye. She can seduce nearly any man, and drive them to murder as well, even though the victim is often Tomie herself. While one lover seeks to keep her for himself, another grows terrified of the immortal succubus. But soon they realize that no matter how many times they kill her, the world will never be free of Tomie.


Compare

The complete classic horror series, now available in a single deluxe volume. Murdered again and again, one girl always comes back for more... Tomie Kawakami is a femme fatale with long black hair and a beauty mark just under her left eye. She can seduce nearly any man, and drive them to murder as well, even though the victim is often Tomie herself. While one lover seeks to The complete classic horror series, now available in a single deluxe volume. Murdered again and again, one girl always comes back for more... Tomie Kawakami is a femme fatale with long black hair and a beauty mark just under her left eye. She can seduce nearly any man, and drive them to murder as well, even though the victim is often Tomie herself. While one lover seeks to keep her for himself, another grows terrified of the immortal succubus. But soon they realize that no matter how many times they kill her, the world will never be free of Tomie.

30 review for 富江―The complete comics of Tomie

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    let’s break it down woot woot good: - almost 800 pgs of junji ito’s artwork?? i mean, what a lovely treat for my eyeballs - spicy commentary on the effects of societal beauty standards bad? how dare i have anything negative to say, i KNOW: - it felt repetitive...story after story of unsuspecting ppl being affected by tomie, ending in her or their death (not even like fun death. just a lot of stabbing and dismembering, booooOring) - i wish there had been more body horror involved. the bio horror that let’s break it down woot woot good: - almost 800 pgs of junji ito’s artwork?? i mean, what a lovely treat for my eyeballs - spicy commentary on the effects of societal beauty standards bad? how dare i have anything negative to say, i KNOW: - it felt repetitive...story after story of unsuspecting ppl being affected by tomie, ending in her or their death (not even like fun death. just a lot of stabbing and dismembering, booooOring) - i wish there had been more body horror involved. the bio horror that is tomie’s regenerative ability was pretty much the most extreme part of this book, and while it was cool, it wasn’t NEARLY as trippy or grotesque as the imagery seen in uzumaki, gyo, or some of ito’s other shorts. - some of the stories were definitely a bit on the absurd side, even for the usual bizarre shit that ito brings to the scene. overall, glad i can check this off my list. def think it’s a bit overhyped tho (pls don’t come for me junji is still a king)

  2. 4 out of 5

    daph pink ♡

    a main course without dessert🙄

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Beauty... ... is in the eye of the beholder. I've often said that books are more disturbing to me than films, as I can imagine much worse than a film is going to show me (most of the films that truly get under my skin are things like The Haunting (1963) where you don't actually see anything). With the proper writing and descriptions, I can unnerve myself more than a film ever could... Junji Ito seems to exist just to hear statements like that, ask angrily "You can imagine worse than I can show Beauty... ... is in the eye of the beholder. I've often said that books are more disturbing to me than films, as I can imagine much worse than a film is going to show me (most of the films that truly get under my skin are things like The Haunting (1963) where you don't actually see anything). With the proper writing and descriptions, I can unnerve myself more than a film ever could... Junji Ito seems to exist just to hear statements like that, ask angrily "You can imagine worse than I can show you?" proceed to give me a Kubrick stare and say "Challenge accepted." He then proceeds to draw the most horrific imagery; pure unfiltered nightmare fuel at its finest. Sure, it's still a book, but Ito doesn't need my imagination to scare me, he does it fine on his own. I read the gigantic Tomie omnibus released by Viz, which is a large hardcover comparable to the size of hardcover Stephen King or fantasy novel. In other words, if you dropped it on your toe, you take a chance of crushing the digit rather than bruising it (I'm sure Ito would delight in that thought). This makes sense though giving that Ito wrote Tomie periodically from 1987 - 2000. You can also tell that it started early into his career as the first two stories are nowhere near as polished. The art is very basic in these two, the narrative isn't as strong, and some of the sequencing is a touch on the confusing side. Let's get this out of the way, the book as a whole is uneven. Some of the stories work significantly better than others. Characters are seemingly set up as important (and may even be for a few chapters) and then are dismissed. Plotlines come and go, and if you look at the most recent chapters and the storyline, you could be easily forgiven for questioning how the hell we ended up in this direction. That said, the uneven nature of Tomie almost works in its favor for me. Not because it improves the story, but because we get to see something of a history of Ito himself. As he started this so early into his career and played with it for 13 years, we get to see him evolve as an artist all around. Reading this book as a whole, you will see Ito grow as an artist, you will see him control the pacing/narrative much better and you'll see him learn how to absolutely make you dread turning the pages. The more problematic nature of Tomie, rather than the pacing, is some of the underlying themes. Tomie... is something, but what I can't say. Part succubus, part grudge spirit; she can seduce about any man she meets, captivating them to the point where they will kill for her or, as is frequently the case, kill her. What feels like an issue here is that I really don't know what Ito is getting at with this. On one hand, part of me feels that it's a criticism of masculinity and how Japan can fetishize school girls (as frankly one of the creepiest aspects of the book is how EVERY man no matter what age wants Tomie). On the other, it also feels borderline misogynistic how Tomie being viewed by so many as the perfect idol of femininity, does nothing other than destroy all the lives around her. There are cases to be made for both sides in different chapters (hell, sometimes in the SAME chapter), and I'd be lying if I didn't say it made me uncomfortable at some points. ... Let me repeat that, "it made me uncomfortable." While I can criticize, or at the very least point this aspect and question it (without an answer, I should add), I also have to concede that just making the reader uncomfortable may very well be the only point. It adds, in its own way, to the overall level of uncomfort while reading. It is problematic, but to a certain extent, horror in general is always problematic when examined thoroughly. It is both the most progressive and regressive of genres (punishment for anything considered outside of the classic idea of proper behavior, yet a genre where a woman typically defeats the psychotic male wielding a phallic symbol by outsmarting him... yes, horror tropes are often very conflicted as a whole on what sort of message they want to send). Is Tomie a masterpiece? No. Uzumaki will almost certainly go down as Ito's masterwork... but Tomie is a special sort of oddity. It's pacing may be all over the place, and admittedly some chapters are not effective, but when it is, it is terrifying. While it is no longer a career spanning work as Ito has fortunately gone on to create many more nightmares for us, it is long enough that we see him learn his craft, making this both a fascinating, and yes, terrifying work. Well worth a read for any horror fan. 4/5 stars. Also, before I go, let me leave you with one last nightmare inducing image, because, well... ITO! You are so very welcome. Pleasant dreams.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emm C²

    I love this series, which is both a surrealist, fever-dream horror and a dark commentary on social perceptions of beauty and ugliness, in both personality and looks, as well as human destructiveness. Well, if you want to psychoanalyze. Tomie is a horror - biological scifi series of related short stories, focused on an immortal woman who has such beauty that it drives people to jealous extremes, with a maddening personality to match. Any attempt to get rid of her will just cause her to bio-regener I love this series, which is both a surrealist, fever-dream horror and a dark commentary on social perceptions of beauty and ugliness, in both personality and looks, as well as human destructiveness. Well, if you want to psychoanalyze. Tomie is a horror - biological scifi series of related short stories, focused on an immortal woman who has such beauty that it drives people to jealous extremes, with a maddening personality to match. Any attempt to get rid of her will just cause her to bio-regenerate into more Tomies. Tomie is the villain and the protagonist, the victim and the perpetrator, all at the same time. Anyone who comes into contact with her, regardless of age or gender, is ultimately doomed. For the positives, the art, most noticeably, is effing marvelous (and there's nearly 800 solid pages of it!!) A lot of panorama drawings in minute detail. The story is actually equally as good, and inventive. With the premise it has, I thought it subverted or completely reversed a lot of typical horror tropes you would think it'd have. I like that the other female characters besides Tomie (who is debateably even human, anyway) are portrayed in a much kinder light, especially the heroine of the first mini-arc. There's a surprising amount of character development, considering Tomie is the only one who sticks around permanently. My personal favourite of the separate shorts were "Hair" and "Little Finger". As for the negative... A few of the chapters get far-fetched to the point of being ridiculous, and don't match the series metaphor or purpose at all. "Babysitter" in particular was the weakest, and I think the one about the sake was just written to disgust. (I still like the sake one, but it is a little bit absurd) The latter shorts can feel kind of formulaic, but are still good. Tomie's character, mostly because of the sheer volume of Tomie(s) in the book, can be kind of tiresome after awhile. In the first story, she isn't even an antagonist, but she seems to get more relentless and vicious as the stories go. Art - 5.5/5 Story - 4.5/5 Characterization - 4/5 Inventiveness - 4.5/5 Bizarre Character Deaths - 5/5 General Score - 5/5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    Just in case you have missed it, Viz Media released three compendiums of Junji Ito's works: Gyo, Uzumaki, and the newest one, Tomie. Viz Media's Tomie compiles Ito's 14-year work in this beautifully bound tome of horror. To give you a background about this episodic manga's main character, just remember these four things about her: 1. Tomie can seduce about any man she meets. These men will do anything just to get her. 2. These men will ultimately want to kill her, often times chop her to bits. 3. Bu Just in case you have missed it, Viz Media released three compendiums of Junji Ito's works: Gyo, Uzumaki, and the newest one, Tomie. Viz Media's Tomie compiles Ito's 14-year work in this beautifully bound tome of horror. To give you a background about this episodic manga's main character, just remember these four things about her: 1. Tomie can seduce about any man she meets. These men will do anything just to get her. 2. These men will ultimately want to kill her, often times chop her to bits. 3. But Tomie almost cannot die. She heals most of her nonfatal wounds very fast. 4. Whenever a body part is chopped off of her, that part spawns another living Tomie. When these four things are combined, a genuinely eerie cycle of gore, murders and tons and tons of bitching Tomies. Tomie's stories are told in chapters, vaguely connected with each other. I can even say that it is a collection of standalone short stories that have a beginning act, a second act and always a horrific conclusion. This book gets its strength from the harrowing details of Junji Ito's illustrations, giving it a uniquely dark psychological feel of a world totally ruled by this girl Tomie. Like his other works, Tomie gives the readers an uneasy feel of a large-scale, town-wide claustrophobia where everybody is trapped in this seemingly insurmountable problem. This theme can be seen in his other works Gyo and Uzumaki. Collecting more than a decade of Ito's works, a reader can also see how the author gradually hones his crafts through the years. The only downside of it is that there is no story development at all. The chapters are good by themselves but they really do not add up to something that can be a worthy conclusion of the whole series. Like how do we stop this girl from invading and multiplying, or how to stop her from luring men to their demise. The last chapter offers tiny bit of resolution but nothing is really resolved at all. I think what Tomie needs is a protagonist. Someone who will be our eyes of the story's progression and the key as to how Tomie can be stopped. I recommend this Junji Ito manga if you are really into horror stuff. It is nicely bound and has some very disturbing imagery inside.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Quentin

    I quite enjoyed Uzumaki, Junji Ito's strange and terrifying epic of a town infested with and ultimately consumed by spirals. It was weird, and beautifully rendered, and even translated into English, beautifully written. Tomie is as strange and gorgeous, but I was so bothered by its implications that I can't recommend it as emphatically. This story focuses on a girl, named Tomie, who entrances any man that she meets and ultimately works them into such a frenzy that they kill her and dismember her I quite enjoyed Uzumaki, Junji Ito's strange and terrifying epic of a town infested with and ultimately consumed by spirals. It was weird, and beautifully rendered, and even translated into English, beautifully written. Tomie is as strange and gorgeous, but I was so bothered by its implications that I can't recommend it as emphatically. This story focuses on a girl, named Tomie, who entrances any man that she meets and ultimately works them into such a frenzy that they kill her and dismember her. However, she also is seemingly immortal, and each fragment of her thus produced grows into a new version of her. There isn't even really an overarching story (as there is in Uzumaki). Rather, its told as a series of vignettes. The story jumps around between a wide variety of characters who intersect with Tomie. Most go mad, or die, or meet an otherwise sticky end. Tomie likewise is not really a character herself; when she does speak, it's to selfishly demand expensive gifts or to ridicule those around her as unattractive, stupid, or worthless. And here we get to the problem of the book--I feel like this is a male fever dream about violence against women. Here the titular character is inescapably beautiful, petulant, and demanding of attention...and it is these qualities that lead men to sadistically murder her and chop her up. A woman who embodies the worst sexist stereotypes forces men to do violence to her (and to others, in some cases). Men who beat women, or rape them, or otherwise abuse them, frequently draw on such stereotypes as justifications. Maybe Ito thought he was writing a satire--certainly there are comedic elements in the story, as when (in one vignette) a group of men are so entranced by Tomie that they pile on to what they think is her body and carve each other up in a fight over her while she escapes with another man. But for this book to be a satire, someone would need to question the stereotypical idea that women's behavior is the cause of their own violation. And no one does that anywhere in the book. If Ito is assuming his readers should already have dispelled that idea from their head, he is likewise assuming that the cultural pool of stereotypes from which he drew Tomie is not pernicious and broadly embraced. And I don't think he's right. I can't knock Ito's talent--the art and story are rich and compelling as with Uzumaki. But I couldn't shake the feeling that this was just an excuse to show women being dismembered because they deserved it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    Tomie is a lovecraftian monstrosity trapped in the body of a stunningly beautiful girl. She can seduce nearly any man with nothing but a single glance, driving them mad with lust and envy until eventually pushing them to commit brutal murders. Though strangely enough, the victim of the murders are almost always Tomie herself. Countless men and women have fallen victim to Tomie's supernatural charms and Tomie herself has fallen victim to hundreds of atrocities as a result, but soon the world begi Tomie is a lovecraftian monstrosity trapped in the body of a stunningly beautiful girl. She can seduce nearly any man with nothing but a single glance, driving them mad with lust and envy until eventually pushing them to commit brutal murders. Though strangely enough, the victim of the murders are almost always Tomie herself. Countless men and women have fallen victim to Tomie's supernatural charms and Tomie herself has fallen victim to hundreds of atrocities as a result, but soon the world begins to realize that no matter how many times they kill Tomie, the world will never be free of her cruelty. She keeps coming back. The story begins with Tomie seducing her teacher and a group of male students. They go insane with rage and lust, brutally dismembering her corpse, scattering her by a river all while fighting amongst each other like a flock of savages. Tomie’s streak of seducing victims with her demonic charm finally comes to an end, until she shows up to school the very next day to continue driving everyone insane. It turns out that chopping up Tomie didn’t kill her, it only allowed her to divide, spread and conquer like an army of humanoid cancer cells. The book is a series of stand-alone stories revolving around the many replicas of Tomie. Each story gives us a way of seeing different sides of the same monstrous girl. She appears as the daughter of a mourning elderly couple, the narcissistic model for a wannabe millionaire painter, a perverted child seducer, a medical experiment gone wrong, we see many faces of Tomie and we’re never truly certain on which face is the real her. She’s like every mythological seductress all rolled into one. She’s a siren, succubus, lamia, Lilith, medusa and every other deadly seductress you can possibly think of. On top of this there’s Ito’s signature grotesque body horror to go along with each version of the wicked maiden. Tomie is an enigma. If you slice her open, she heals right back up. If you cut her into a hundred pieces, each piece will regenerate and take on its own form and personality. At first we see her as a victim because of how brutally she's murdered by a teacher and a group of students, but as we come to learn more about her, it's almost as if she wants to be killed over and over. She's intentionally cruel, manipulative and psychotic, playing the damsel in distress one moment and happily destroying the lives of innocent people the next. She intentionally pushes people beyond their limits, taking a sick pleasure in the chaos she creates as the world goes mad with lust over her beauty. And since she keeps coming back, there's no limits or consequences to the amount of chaos she can conjure up. It's a very interesting take on lovecraftian horror, interweaving folklore from mythological creatures scattered throughout history wrapped up in the body of a seemingly innocent beautiful girl. Tomie is the first manga Junji Ito ever published, so its age does show a bit at times, especially near the beginning of the story. It was also published over a very long period of time, there’s a massive difference between the first few chapters and the later chapters. If you’re not too impressed with the beginning, the art, quality and storytelling improve significantly over time, so it’s still great for a first published work and gives you a taste of the weirdness and brutality Ito is capable of. I would recommend Uzumaki first if you’re new to Ito, but Tomie is still definitely worth checking out.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mindi

    This is only my second manga, and it's also my second by Ito. My introduction to manga was with UZUMAKI, and I think that set the bar too high. I'm worried it's all going to be downhill from here. That's a joke, I know there is so much amazing manga in the world, but I honestly can't believe that I read such an amazing one first. TOMIE has all of the stunning artwork of UZUMAKI, but I just didn't quite love the story as much. It's good, but it's also a bit flawed. This is a large compilation, and This is only my second manga, and it's also my second by Ito. My introduction to manga was with UZUMAKI, and I think that set the bar too high. I'm worried it's all going to be downhill from here. That's a joke, I know there is so much amazing manga in the world, but I honestly can't believe that I read such an amazing one first. TOMIE has all of the stunning artwork of UZUMAKI, but I just didn't quite love the story as much. It's good, but it's also a bit flawed. This is a large compilation, and unfortunately all of the stories have the same basic storyline. When you read them all back to back they become a bit repetitive, but I have to remember that these stories were originally released on their own, so reading them spread out would have been a much different experience. I was really drawn in at the beginning. Tomie is far from perfect, but she definitely does not deserve her fate. After a school field trip goes horribly wrong for her, her classmates, and her teacher, some version of Tomie returns to enact revenge. She becomes a beautiful siren that is absolutely irresistible to men, however, their devotion always comes at a cost. The art in this deluxe version is exactly what I have come to expect from Ito. It's so twisted and wrong, violent and disturbing. I find myself just staring at his art. It's both repellent and horribly stunning. While I did enjoy the stories collected here, they were all basically different versions of the same revenge narrative that Ito establishes early on. I didn't mind it as much while I was reading it, but in retrospect all the stories are basically the same. Regardless, I still recommend this manga because of the absolutely brilliant art. I can't wait to read GYO by Ito next. At some point I'm going to have to branch out and find another horror manga. But for now, I'm really enjoying Ito's work. 4.5 stars

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

    I have a problem with this narrative of the femme fatale being portrayed as a bitch who drives men to violence; as a monster who broke their hearts. Tomie is objectified throughout this book and there is no character development. In fact, she hardly even feels like a character. Tomie is a reflection on what the author hates in all woman and a justification for violence against them. At the end the reader knows nothing about Tomie or what motivates her. In addition, some of her cruelty doesn't ma I have a problem with this narrative of the femme fatale being portrayed as a bitch who drives men to violence; as a monster who broke their hearts. Tomie is objectified throughout this book and there is no character development. In fact, she hardly even feels like a character. Tomie is a reflection on what the author hates in all woman and a justification for violence against them. At the end the reader knows nothing about Tomie or what motivates her. In addition, some of her cruelty doesn't make sense and is simply there to make the reader hate her leading them to believe that she deserves to be brutally murdered. In some of the stories her wrong is that she has simply rejected these men. The reality is no woman had it coming not even one as cruel as Tomie. Even today woman are being mutilated or killed for not being interested. It is within our culture that men feel entitled to the bodies of women and this thought is what puts all women in danger. Cast as the seductress she receives the hatred from men of wanting to possess her like an object rather than a person with feelings, hopes, and goals. This story perpetuates male violence and the idea that a woman must be docile willing always to be loved, and that anger, greed, and gluttony are disgusting and unfeminine. However, the artwork is incredibly detailed and it is in a way a compelling story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Hernandez

    Tomie is a mixed bag for me it has both good and bad parts to the story, but I am thoroughly impressed by Ito's genius, creativity, and overall style that is uniquely his own. By far, Uzumaki is his masterpiece novel that I love with all my heart. Tomie and Gyo are just impressive in their own unique ways. I will read anything and everything that Junji Ito will create out into this world. Tomie is a mixed bag for me it has both good and bad parts to the story, but I am thoroughly impressed by Ito's genius, creativity, and overall style that is uniquely his own. By far, Uzumaki is his masterpiece novel that I love with all my heart. Tomie and Gyo are just impressive in their own unique ways. I will read anything and everything that Junji Ito will create out into this world.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ria

    ''Her only real interest is in herself. My daughter sees men as little more than adornments. She wants to be desired.... just a boost to her ego.'' how many Tomies do u think are out there? i always loved her aesthetic and now i finally read the complete work. i can die in peace. i even preordered the Tomie Funko Pop :) please get me help. love the sapphic vibes of the movies. i just found out that they were gonna adapt into a series for Quibi but well now rip to both. ''Her only real interest is in herself. My daughter sees men as little more than adornments. She wants to be desired.... just a boost to her ego.'' how many Tomies do u think are out there? i always loved her aesthetic and now i finally read the complete work. i can die in peace. i even preordered the Tomie Funko Pop :) please get me help. love the sapphic vibes of the movies. i just found out that they were gonna adapt into a series for Quibi but well now rip to both.

  12. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    Junji Ito's work is pretty hit or miss for me — I feel like I usually love or hate it — and this was, sadly, the biggest "miss" thus far. I just couldn't get into this at all and didn't feel like it carried Ito's usual brand of bizarro, gross horror that I get so intrigued by. Junji Ito's work is pretty hit or miss for me — I feel like I usually love or hate it — and this was, sadly, the biggest "miss" thus far. I just couldn't get into this at all and didn't feel like it carried Ito's usual brand of bizarro, gross horror that I get so intrigued by.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Isabela Vilella

    Lesson learned: life is hard as an immortal succubus (already knew that from personal experience). Take advantage of your talent to charm men before they eventually mutilate you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Lawson

    Some of the best in body horror.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Blair

    ‘Painter’ was one of my favourites from the collection Shiver, and I’d wanted to read more about its central character, Tomie, ever since. Tomie is a beautiful girl who sparks mania in almost everyone she meets: first comes intense attachment, then the desire to murder her. She’s also an indestructible monster who can create infinite copies of herself. Tomie collects three volumes of manga, 20 stories in total. There are lots of ways to read Tomie. Some argue the stories’ focus on repeated violen ‘Painter’ was one of my favourites from the collection Shiver, and I’d wanted to read more about its central character, Tomie, ever since. Tomie is a beautiful girl who sparks mania in almost everyone she meets: first comes intense attachment, then the desire to murder her. She’s also an indestructible monster who can create infinite copies of herself. Tomie collects three volumes of manga, 20 stories in total. There are lots of ways to read Tomie. Some argue the stories’ focus on repeated violence against women makes them misogynistic by default, but Tomie can also be interpreted as a comment on society’s obsession with possessing and/or destroying beauty. Despite Tomie’s villainy, there is something satisfying about seeing her mock and denigrate the men who so pathetically trail around after her, and also something triumphant about the fact that no matter how many times, and how violently, she is killed, she can never be destroyed; she keeps coming back. Her curse is tragic, but Tomie herself is often depicted taking pleasure in her eternal invulnerability, and the men who covet and stalk her are surely not meant to be sympathetic. As a horror heroine, she’s the perfect combination of sympathetic final girl and hateful queen bitch. Having read this, I better understand why so few Tomie stories are collected elsewhere. The effectiveness of Tomie as a character depends partly on the reader understanding her powers and recognising her face, as she often shows up with a different name... or as something not quite human. The best stories, such as ‘Photo’, ‘Mansion’ and ‘Top Model’, tend to be part of interlinked sequences – though there are some strong standalones, like ‘Painter’ and ‘Boy’. The recurrent themes also produce a sense of overload across 700+ pages. For me, the weakest felt like strings of violent scenes with little plot, but at their best, the Tomie stories are essential horror. --- ‘Tomie’, first published (as far as I can tell) in 1997, is as close as the character gets to an origin story. The narrator is Tomie’s friend Reiko, who explains that Tomie is dead – violently murdered, in fact: ‘pieces of her body were found scattered everywhere’. But then, after her funeral has taken place, she comes back to school... The story suggests Tomie may be seeking revenge for the manner of her death – it’s also implied she wasn’t actually human to begin with – and establishes a villain (Mr. Takagi, a teacher Tomie was involved with). It’s interesting to follow the evolution of Junji Ito’s style through this book: in terms of both illustration and story, this very first Tomie manga is amateurish, even incoherent at points. ‘Tomie Part 2: Morita Hospital’ shares its titular setting with the story that follows, ‘Basement’. In a theme that will recur throughout the collection, two young couples – Yukiko and Tadashi in ‘Morita Hospital’, and Reiko and Sato in ‘Basement’ – become entangled with Tomie, incurring her wrath. It becomes clear that Tomie inspires obsession in men but also, ultimately, drives them to kill. Yet Tomie can’t truly die, and – in an echo of her first murder – dismembering her body only causes her to multiply. In ‘Photo’, Tsukiko poses as a member of the school photo club in order to take pictures of her classmates’ crushes, which she then sells back to them at exorbitant prices. The scheme also gives her an excuse to photograph her own crush, Yamazaki. Tsukiko is dismayed when Yamazaki asks for a photograph of Tomie (who is now head of the ‘ethics committee’) but, when she develops the photos, they all have something very strange about them. Thus another rule of the Tomie canon is established: photographs reveal her true form – a fact that is as much a surprise to Tomie as it is to Tsukiko. ‘Kiss’ and ‘Mansion’ also feature Tsukiko and Yamazaki. The three stories form a trilogy which culminates in the reappearance of Takagi, as well as a payoff to the mysterious prologue of ‘Photo’. By now, the art has improved significantly, with large panels used effectively to show close-ups on Tomie’s distorted face or sightless eyes. I also love the way Takagi is drawn; the character is recognisable, but small tweaks make his expression seem more unhinged with every appearance. ‘Mansion’ has an indelible climactic image I have definitely seen before, can’t remember where – probably in some blog post providing examples of how freakish and terrifying Junji Ito’s creations can be. ‘Revenge’ is a standalone story in which a group of mountaineers come across the naked body of a young woman. Despite sub-zero temperatures, she turns out to be alive, and proceeds to wreak havoc on the group’s dynamic. Not one of the best, though I found the final panel chilling. At this point, the reader is well aware that Tomie can replicate herself endlessly. ‘Waterfall Basin’, which features the final appearance of Takagi, underlines this by featuring an army of Tomies, but the concept doesn’t really go anywhere. ‘Assassins’, in which two versions of Tomie each demand that the other is destroyed, is also relatively weak. Between those two is ‘Painter’, which remains one of my favourite Tomie stories. Mitsuo Mori is a succesful artist, satisfied with his work until he meets Tomie at one of his shows. She mocks his paintings, drives his muse away and suggests he should paint her instead. In the context of the whole series, I can now recognise Tomie’s comment that ‘snapshots don’t do me justice’ as a sly callback to the events of ‘Photo’. Mori is driven mad trying to capture Tomie’s true essence... and when he eventually does, she is enraged, with gory consequences for them both. ‘Hair’ goes in a slightly different direction: instead of a man getting obsessed with Tomie, the story centres on two young girls. Chie finds a box of Tomie’s hair in her father’s study; she and her friend Miki become transfixed by it and begin to see visions of Tomie. With Tomie, even something as innocuous as a clump of hair is capable of inspiring murderous passion. When the hair starts to ‘infect’ Chie and Miki, it leads some of the most disturbing imagery in the book – scenes that made me physically squirm. At the beginning of ‘Adopted Daughter’, you wonder whether Tomie has finally met her match. She is taken in by the Hinadas, an elderly couple notorious for adopting a string of unfortunate young women. The ‘daughters’ invariably die soon after being adopted, and the rumour is that the Hinadas literally suck the life out of them. The irony is that, while they are not quite the villains everyone assumes, meeting Tomie turns them into monsters. I didn’t care for ‘Little Finger’. The male lead, Hiroya, is drawn with exaggerated features to emphasise his ugliness, but the exaggeration is taken so far that the character appears clownish. This sits uncomfortably with the rest of the illustrations in Tomie which, while often bizarre and horrifying, are always finely done and have their own sort of in-world realism. ‘Moromi’, in which one of Tomie’s lovers/killers tries to dispose of her body in a sake factory, is the worst in the book and feels phoned-in. However, sandwiched between ‘Little Finger’ and ‘Moromi’ is ‘Boy’, another of my favourites. Tomie is at her most ruthless here as she gets her claws into a lonely little boy and convinces him she’s his real mother – only to later reject and taunt him once she’s grown stronger. As with ‘Hair’, it’s refreshing to get a different perspective to balance out all the stories about tormented men. Despite some stiff competition, ‘Babysitter’ is probably the most stomach-churning entry in Tomie. When Erita arrives for her latest babysitting job, she’s locked inside by the sinister parents. The ‘baby’ has Tomie’s face (of course), though it can hardly be said to resemble a human child in any other sense. Erita’s ensuing ordeal makes the bloody ending feel cathartic. ‘Gathering’ has a good core concept: Tomie’s fans have become so numerous and devoted that they have formed a cult; Umehara is introduced to the group when his friend Miyagawa suggests they attend ‘a gathering’ together. But Umehara, whose girlfriend Naoko has recently passed away, is immune to Tomie’s charms – which, naturally, enrages her. Interestingly, he’s also one of the few men to encounter Tomie and survive relatively unscathed. To close the book, there’s another (loose) trilogy. ‘Passing Demon’, ‘Top Model’ and ‘Old and Ugly’ are set in a city where a number of near-identical little girls – identical in that they all look just like Tomie – are growing up in different families. These stories take the concept of ‘Assassins’ a step further by pitting several (part-)Tomies against one another, while a mysterious ‘man in black’ fulfils the Takagi role. Yasuko, the sister of one of the Tomie-girls, acts as the protagonist here, but the most compelling figure is Ryo, the arrogant title character of ‘Top Model’. The handsome, successful Ryo is more of an equal to Tomie than any of her other suitors, which is perhaps what makes his story one of the strongest. TinyLetter | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris Greensmith

    "She called herself Tomie. She was young, and beautiful." Not as good as his other works. I felt it was very repetitive, Tomie pops up in some way and people either try to kill her or go mental. The art was creepy, but doesn't have the edge that Uzumaki or Gyo had. But still a good read, even if it did drag a bit... "She called herself Tomie. She was young, and beautiful." Not as good as his other works. I felt it was very repetitive, Tomie pops up in some way and people either try to kill her or go mental. The art was creepy, but doesn't have the edge that Uzumaki or Gyo had. But still a good read, even if it did drag a bit...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Armand

    The primordial archetypes of Sex and Death meld together to concoct the perfect femme fatale in Tomie. No siren can be deadlier: she lures men by corrupting their most primal instincts - to copulate and to kill - and fuses them into a heady melange calculated to destroy them from the inside. Insidious, merciless, and voracious - she will stop at nothing to get her claws on her target. And once she has cornered her prey she sheds her visage to reveal her true self, in all the myriad monstrous glo The primordial archetypes of Sex and Death meld together to concoct the perfect femme fatale in Tomie. No siren can be deadlier: she lures men by corrupting their most primal instincts - to copulate and to kill - and fuses them into a heady melange calculated to destroy them from the inside. Insidious, merciless, and voracious - she will stop at nothing to get her claws on her target. And once she has cornered her prey she sheds her visage to reveal her true self, in all the myriad monstrous glories that can only spring from the fervid imagination of Junji Ito. If you're familiar with his oeuvre, you know that he can whip up some truly sumptuous body horror. Tomie ranks among the best of these, and it's great to see how Ito's art improved over time. Check out the huge difference in quality between the first and the last chapter. Anyway, regarding prey - she doesn't spare women either, treating them with hostility or contempt. Witness her stint as the head of a high school's ethics committee who goes into a bloody spree when a rival exposes her real form in Photo/Kiss. Her victims have hailed her as a goddess, and that would have been accurate if divinity presupposes a bloodthirsty creature with the immortality and moral compass of a hydra. She can spawn perfect clones of herself from just a handful of severed body parts, a transplanted organ, or even copious amounts of congealed blood. And yes, that process is not a very pretty sight, to put it mildly. You know how every creature's main biological imperative is to reproduce? I kinda think that's the key to Tomie. She lures and provokes men into a killing lust precisely so that they could cut her up into disparate parts. Then from these bits she'll grow different clones of herself, developing into a horde of lovely Tomies after a stomach-churning metamorphosis. Thus the cycle would once again commence. The gist of all of this is that she reproduces not via sex, which this manga rather surprisingly lacks, but by violence. This is a collection of mostly stand-alone stories that explore the different facets of our anti-heroine. She's been the muse of demented artists, the adopted daughter of a tragic old couple, a seductive stepmother, a sort of saké additive, etc. Taken together though, the whole is much more than the sum of its parts, weaving a grand tapestry of the lives and loves of our dear, distasteful Tomie. For such a voluminous tome, I do wish there was more addenda than the paltry Afterword written by the author. I also hope that in the future, Ito would write the definitive genesis of Tomie, as her origin was not really disclosed here. I have always been fascinated by the famous enchantresses of history. Combine that with my love of horror and the grotesque and I can't be faulted if I fall under Tomie's spell. I'm lucky that she doesn't exist on this plane or I'd have a hell of a time shaking off that black widow. In any case, even with a book as thick as this, by the end I found myself craving for more. I guess I have no choice but to source the Junji animé and the rather voluminous film series featuring this hellish minx *sigh* I'm rating this 9/10 or 4 stars out of 5.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Tomie, the mysterious girl with the birthmark and the hypnotic voice. The voice that can make you do anything. Make you fall madly in love with her. Make you obsessed to the point of murder. But Tomie will not die. This volume collects all twenty chapters of Junji Ito's surreal horror comic. Most of the stories are self-contained, but there are a few that have connections to others, including the multi-part finale. Considering Tomie's M.O. is pretty much the same from one to the next, it's remarka Tomie, the mysterious girl with the birthmark and the hypnotic voice. The voice that can make you do anything. Make you fall madly in love with her. Make you obsessed to the point of murder. But Tomie will not die. This volume collects all twenty chapters of Junji Ito's surreal horror comic. Most of the stories are self-contained, but there are a few that have connections to others, including the multi-part finale. Considering Tomie's M.O. is pretty much the same from one to the next, it's remarkable how diverse the stories are. But then, not all the Tomies are exactly the same. Yes, all the Tomies. Tomie is legion. There might be one in your town right now. In your school. In your family. BEWARE.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    Tomie features some great artwork and body horror, but becomes repititive after some chapters.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rituraj Kashyap

    Tomie is a beautiful girl. Men obsess over her, to the point that they kill for her. But with this obsession comes an urge to chop her to pieces. And after they kill her, from every chopped part grows a new Tomie. So you could say she's like a lizard's tail, only here it's the tail from which the same lizard grows back. The book is divided into chapters, each a self-contained story barring a few. With each chapter, the reader will find new ways by which Tomie regenerates. There's even a chapter w Tomie is a beautiful girl. Men obsess over her, to the point that they kill for her. But with this obsession comes an urge to chop her to pieces. And after they kill her, from every chopped part grows a new Tomie. So you could say she's like a lizard's tail, only here it's the tail from which the same lizard grows back. The book is divided into chapters, each a self-contained story barring a few. With each chapter, the reader will find new ways by which Tomie regenerates. There's even a chapter where she grows from her blood, and another where she gets four of her fingers cut off and a Tomie sprouts from each of them. Junji Ito has drawn some pretty nightmarish images, although not as much as there are in Uzumaki. Before reading this, remember that you won't find any closure at the end. There's no explanation as to why Tomie's like this. But maybe the best horror is that in which nothing gets resolved.

  21. 5 out of 5

    hannaღ

    It's fascinating to see how Junji Ito's drawing style changed over time - from his quite crudely drawn first stories up to the distinctive look of his more recent work where basically every panel is a piece of art. Plus Tomie is just an amazingly twisted character, I love her! It's fascinating to see how Junji Ito's drawing style changed over time - from his quite crudely drawn first stories up to the distinctive look of his more recent work where basically every panel is a piece of art. Plus Tomie is just an amazingly twisted character, I love her!

  22. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    This is the weirdest thing I’ve ever read. I like it. What’s it about? There’s a girl named Tomie. She’s a beautiful young woman and guys end up getting obsessed over her. They get so obsessed that despite falling in love they get unstoppable urges to chop her up! Wait, what? The thing is she always comes back to life somehow and multiplying herself in disturbing ways. In this collection of short stories that all tie in to one bigger story, we find out if there’s any way this sadistic monster girl This is the weirdest thing I’ve ever read. I like it. What’s it about? There’s a girl named Tomie. She’s a beautiful young woman and guys end up getting obsessed over her. They get so obsessed that despite falling in love they get unstoppable urges to chop her up! Wait, what? The thing is she always comes back to life somehow and multiplying herself in disturbing ways. In this collection of short stories that all tie in to one bigger story, we find out if there’s any way this sadistic monster girl can be killed as she torments several innocent (and some not so innocent) people. Pros: The story is interesting. It’s very unique and unlike anything I’ve ever read (except for a few similarities to Ed Brubaker’s Fatale but even then this is really different). Most of the artwork is well done and suits the tone of the story. This book has a lot of intense and gory action throughout which I enjoyed. This book is great at horror. It utilizes many horror styles. It’s gory as fuck (don’t let the T+ rating fool you, this is about as fucked up as Garth Ennis’ Crossed at times (still not as fucked up as Berserk though)) throughout, there are several scenes that are generally creepy and it even goes into psychological horror (the most disturbing kind IMO). I dare say that the horror stuff is sorta like Poe meets Ennis in manga form. This book is very unpredictable. I did say this is the weirdest thing I’ve ever read which is true. Something cool to add though is that it still makes perfect sense despite being so weird! It’s the good kind of weird. (Believe it or not, this makes perfect sense within context) Cons: The characters aren’t very interesting in my opinion. The non-Tomie characters usually are only briefly there in the short story, there were only a couple I was particularly interested in. Tomie would be a good horror villain if it weren’t for one major problem: she seems to have no real motive. She just goes around fucking up people’s lives and being a bitch for no real reason except because she’s evil. While most of the art is good, there are a few scenes I noticed where it looks off. It’s not necessarily terrible but sorta makes me wonder if there was a deadline or something so it didn’t get 100% completed at times. The ending is confusing. Overall: This book is very good but don’t expect a masterpiece. If you want something weird, gory, creepy and intense however look no further. This manga is great for fans of strange horror stories so yeah, if you like weird horror stuff you should read this. If not, you’re most likely going to think that this is just weird and disturbing, which it is but you won’t be able to enjoy it as much as you should! I enjoyed it very much but it isn’t flawless which is why it gets my 4 star rating. 4/5 PS- Custer by Slipknot is the perfect song for this book (CUT CUT CUT ME UP AND FUCK FUCK FUCK ME UP!)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rue

    A series of short stories about the entity 'Tomie' (I say 'entity', because she is most definitely not human). Ito Junji manages to recycle the same plot, but add, twist and distort it so as to keep it relatively enjoyable throughout. However, it is somewhat forgettable (once you've read one, you've read them all), and is redeemed mainly by the art and concept. The story centres around one beautiful girl named, well, Tomie, who takes a mean grip of mens' hearts and subverts them to do any and eve A series of short stories about the entity 'Tomie' (I say 'entity', because she is most definitely not human). Ito Junji manages to recycle the same plot, but add, twist and distort it so as to keep it relatively enjoyable throughout. However, it is somewhat forgettable (once you've read one, you've read them all), and is redeemed mainly by the art and concept. The story centres around one beautiful girl named, well, Tomie, who takes a mean grip of mens' hearts and subverts them to do any and every of her beckoning. The men, as if under some sort of a trance, are more then willing to kill, beat, threaten and berate any one on whom Tomie points her well manicured accusing finger at. By the end of nearly each chapter Tomie is slashed to pieces only to be miraculously reanimated in the next one. Overall, I would reccommend giving it a go if you enjoy horror, however don't expect anything groundbreaking.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Orrin Grey

    While Uzumaki is probably Junji Ito's masterpiece to date, and while I don't really like the Tomie stories as much as much of his other work, it's still hard to deny that Tomie may be his most enduring creation, and not just because she's been around the longest. Tomie is clearly a metaphor, though what for seems much harder to pin down, and changeable from one story to another. While books like Uzumaki and Gyo have a broader vision--even if Uzumaki goes through a series of vignettes and cul-de- While Uzumaki is probably Junji Ito's masterpiece to date, and while I don't really like the Tomie stories as much as much of his other work, it's still hard to deny that Tomie may be his most enduring creation, and not just because she's been around the longest. Tomie is clearly a metaphor, though what for seems much harder to pin down, and changeable from one story to another. While books like Uzumaki and Gyo have a broader vision--even if Uzumaki goes through a series of vignettes and cul-de-sacs to reach it--the Tomie stories only ever tie together thematically, and through the presence, in one form of another, of their titular... well, whatever Tomie is. While characters occasionally recur and narrative through lines do crop up, there's never the sense of one overarching story that you get from Uzumaki, Gyo, and some others. This is both a strength and, I'm sure, for some people a weakness. I'd already read all of the Tomie stories in their previous incarnations, but it's great to have them all collected in one huge doorstop of a volume, especially since it looks so good alongside the recent Viz reissues of Uzumaki and Gyo. Now if they can just package up a bunch of Ito's unrelated, stand-alone stuff I will be a happy consumer indeed.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    Junji Ito, the Japanese master of horror did not disappoint. We have a young girl who allures men with her beauty, then they savagely kill her... Like a siren who lures sailors to their death, but instead the sailors are the ones doing the killing. However, every time they thought they killed her more "copies" of her would rise up from the corpse and become to seek out their next victim. This idea is carried out through most chapters, not going to lie the idea became a bit dry and repetitive. I Junji Ito, the Japanese master of horror did not disappoint. We have a young girl who allures men with her beauty, then they savagely kill her... Like a siren who lures sailors to their death, but instead the sailors are the ones doing the killing. However, every time they thought they killed her more "copies" of her would rise up from the corpse and become to seek out their next victim. This idea is carried out through most chapters, not going to lie the idea became a bit dry and repetitive. I feel conflicted as a reader for Tomie, simultaneous I feel a mix of repulsion and sorrow for her. There remains that absence of love in her life, everyone loves her, but she loves almost nobody. Of course though that absence is no excuse to do what she did. She has an incredibly spoilt brat persona about her, that captivates the men she entrances to go mad with love, thus they kill her as a result of her rejecting them. The ending is ambiguous, we never learn if Tomie properly escaped or not, their is a hint she did and that she didn't, the ending comprises of the question if eternal youth can be snuffed out by time. Ito's style of art is remarkably anachronistic, at times it is sharply stark and rough almost aggressive, which adds another layer of horror to an already gory menagerie of blood and carnage. I look forward to reading another weird Ito concoction.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    These are early stories from Ito, a little rougher (both art and especially story) than you'll find in Uzimaki and Gyo. Would I call this a short-story cycle? In a way, yes, but the stories hang together in a way where there's not much progression of character, setting, or context. Some of the stories, especially the ones that are more overtly interconnected, stand out among the rest. These are early stories from Ito, a little rougher (both art and especially story) than you'll find in Uzimaki and Gyo. Would I call this a short-story cycle? In a way, yes, but the stories hang together in a way where there's not much progression of character, setting, or context. Some of the stories, especially the ones that are more overtly interconnected, stand out among the rest.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Garden

    Tomiiiiiie! OK. So. Tomie. So the first part of the premise of this book is . . . I donno, kinda flatly woman-hating, I guess: there's this crazy beautiful thin-long-limbed big-eyed tiny-skirted anime-dream teen, Tomie, who, because she is too beautiful and too selfish (i.e., she doesn't care about other people's feelings), is murdered and dismembered by her married teacher with whom she has been having an affair and her jealous resentful classmates while out on a field trip. Right? Pretty dismal Tomiiiiiie! OK. So. Tomie. So the first part of the premise of this book is . . . I donno, kinda flatly woman-hating, I guess: there's this crazy beautiful thin-long-limbed big-eyed tiny-skirted anime-dream teen, Tomie, who, because she is too beautiful and too selfish (i.e., she doesn't care about other people's feelings), is murdered and dismembered by her married teacher with whom she has been having an affair and her jealous resentful classmates while out on a field trip. Right? Pretty dismal. OK. BUT THEN THE SECOND PART OF THE PREMISE. The rest of this book is: Tomie arises from death to terrorize and punish ANYONE who ever desires her again in these increasingly gonzo ways where her body regenerates duplicates of itself and every Tomie ever after is hell-bent on bloodlust in this fascinatingly coldblooded purpose-driven but also somehow essentially languid unconcerned kind of way that is . . . well, I don't think I could 100% articulate what Ito's thesis is here but this book is definitely doing some weird, interesting work with the trope it's refracting. There are forty-something stories all built around the same essential premise--Tomie is destroyed and then arises to destroy. Usually she is destroyed because a man falls in love with her and, because it's impossible to fully possess her, he must ensure that she is unpossessable. Which is a really sticky trope to be poking around in, especially in the 90s, especially as a male creator, especially with an anime babe. But for me what makes this book really sing (or screech, maybe) as a collection of bonkers horror stories, rather than fall flat as a slop pile of woman-hating sexualized violence like this kind of material could so easily devolve into, is the fact that Ito isn't telling stories about Tomie's destruction, or even her punishment: Ito is telling stories about what Tomie wreaks, not what is wrought upon her. She isn't punished; she is the punisher, and, as such, these stories retrain the eye upon the eternal return of her essence, just as it is, nothing noble or vetted by the patriarchy about it at all--Tomie is petty and vain and calculating and manipulative and beautiful, and aware of it, aware of it enough to weaponize it, and, having weaponized it, free to fully inhabit it and so become detached--truly and profoundly and completely detached--this ultimate clear-eyed cool-water unknowable core of what men are afraid of in women, that we'll laugh at them, that we won't give a shit if they stay or if they go, the fear that in turn produces our fear of them, that they will murder us. So Ito is telling a bunch of stories about a woman who doesn't have to be afraid. A bunch of stories about a woman who doesn't have to be ashamed. Further, he is telling stories about a woman who can't be made to feel afraid, can't be made to feel ashamed. Which . . . I mean throw that in the pot with his mind-bendingly bizarro visual-concept chops and . . . OK you know what this book fucking rules, it totally does. Minus one star because I wish I had known it was a collection of shorts and not a graphic novel, coz I read the final third too quickly kind of gunning for the conclusion, like DAMN HOW'S THIS GONNA WIND UP, CAN'T WAAAIIITTT and but it doesn't really wind up coz it's not a novel. Anyway definitely if you like horror this is so fun, I would recommend mixing in a story here and there though and probably not just plowing through the whole massive density in one go. Each story is really incredibly rich and singular and you lose that if you plow, same as anything super rich you consume too much of in a row.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rusty Grey

    3.5 stars

  29. 5 out of 5

    Am Y

    I guess you can't talk about Junji Ito without mentioning Tomie, which is why I checked this out. There are a total of 3 volumes in this series, each with ~6-8 chapters (that are also short stories which can be read independently), all of which star Tomie, the title character who's a mysterious and devastatingly beautiful young woman with some kind of otherworldly power over men. They claim to love her, yet the height of that love always means killing and dismembering her, after which she never I guess you can't talk about Junji Ito without mentioning Tomie, which is why I checked this out. There are a total of 3 volumes in this series, each with ~6-8 chapters (that are also short stories which can be read independently), all of which star Tomie, the title character who's a mysterious and devastatingly beautiful young woman with some kind of otherworldly power over men. They claim to love her, yet the height of that love always means killing and dismembering her, after which she never fails to return from the dead. The cycle thus repeats itself over and over again. The first volume was refreshing enough and generated sufficient interest for me to continue on to vol 2, but by vol 3 (also the final volume), this interest had pretty much fizzled out due mostly to the sameness of each chapter's storyline. By the end of vol 3 I was glad it was over and I didn't have to read about Tomie ever again. It definitely didn't help that vol 3 was the weakest in the series and felt the most uninspired. One of the ways Ito baits readers and keeps them returning, is the promise that there is a good mystery to be solved, that will explain the horror taking place. With Tomie this is very much true, because one is intrigued by how and why this girl keeps coming back, and what her purpose is. There is also the fascination with Tomie herself - is she the protagonist or antihero? Whose side are we on exactly - Tomie or her "victims"? And who exactly is the "victim" in the first place - is it the supposed innocents Tomie exerts her mind control over, or Tomie herself, since she always ends up getting murdered and hacked into pieces by those who claim to love her? In this way Tomie offers the reader a lot to think about. A few of the chapters (remembering that they are self-contained stories in their own right) are also pretty good, with unexpected plot turns here and there. But ultimately, from an entertainment perspective, Tomie was on the whole an unrewarding experience for me. The macabre factor quickly loses its appeal because almost the same thing happens in every chapter, and no questions are ever answered (as is the case with many of Ito's works). I went away with a huge sense of deflatedness, brought on mainly by the realisation that my time could have been better spent.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karissa

    This is the third manga collection I have read by Ito. This was a pretty good collection of horror manga stories involving Tomie. I thought the stories got a bit repetitive; this would probably be better if you read one story at a time rather than reading the whole volume at once. This really wasn't a cohesive large story but rather a collection of shorter stories featuring the immortal and regenerative Tomie who tempts men into killing her while destroying their lives. It was very gory and was w This is the third manga collection I have read by Ito. This was a pretty good collection of horror manga stories involving Tomie. I thought the stories got a bit repetitive; this would probably be better if you read one story at a time rather than reading the whole volume at once. This really wasn't a cohesive large story but rather a collection of shorter stories featuring the immortal and regenerative Tomie who tempts men into killing her while destroying their lives. It was very gory and was well done horror. Overall I enjoyed it and thought it was well done. Uzumaki is still my favorite of Ito's works though, I just really enjoyed how Uzumaki was a complete graphic novel rather than a set of loosely related stories. I would still recommend this to horror manga fans; I enjoyed this more than Gyo but not as much as Uzumaki.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.