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More than four centuries have passed since industrial civilization stumbled to its ruin under the self-inflicted blows of climate change and resource depletion. Now, in the ruins of a deserted city, a young man mining metal risks his life to win a priceless clue. That discovery will send him and an unlikely band of seekers on a quest for a place out of legend where human b More than four centuries have passed since industrial civilization stumbled to its ruin under the self-inflicted blows of climate change and resource depletion. Now, in the ruins of a deserted city, a young man mining metal risks his life to win a priceless clue. That discovery will send him and an unlikely band of seekers on a quest for a place out of legend where human beings might once have communicated with distant worlds - a place called Star's Reach.


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More than four centuries have passed since industrial civilization stumbled to its ruin under the self-inflicted blows of climate change and resource depletion. Now, in the ruins of a deserted city, a young man mining metal risks his life to win a priceless clue. That discovery will send him and an unlikely band of seekers on a quest for a place out of legend where human b More than four centuries have passed since industrial civilization stumbled to its ruin under the self-inflicted blows of climate change and resource depletion. Now, in the ruins of a deserted city, a young man mining metal risks his life to win a priceless clue. That discovery will send him and an unlikely band of seekers on a quest for a place out of legend where human beings might once have communicated with distant worlds - a place called Star's Reach.

54 review for Star's Reach: A Novel Of The Deindustrial Future

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris Chester

    I've been a regular reader of JMG's blog for probably about three years now (God, has it really been that long?). I stumbled on his writing shortly after I first started reading about peak oil and had my brain scattered by Reinventing Collapse: The Soviet Example and American Prospects. Abandoning the myth of human progress can be a bitter pill, and there is far, far too much tripe on the Internet that seeks to capitalize on peoples' fears. That's what I've loved about Greer from the get-go. On h I've been a regular reader of JMG's blog for probably about three years now (God, has it really been that long?). I stumbled on his writing shortly after I first started reading about peak oil and had my brain scattered by Reinventing Collapse: The Soviet Example and American Prospects. Abandoning the myth of human progress can be a bitter pill, and there is far, far too much tripe on the Internet that seeks to capitalize on peoples' fears. That's what I've loved about Greer from the get-go. On his surface, as a self-described druid with a beard that would make an Amish person blush, the guy could have been a ridiculous parody of the larger peak oil/prepper scene. Read his words, though, and it quickly becomes clear that this a serious, well-read guy with measured opinions, a strong and visceral distaste for doomsdayisms, and a clear vision of a different, post-industrial society. I read The Ecotechnic Future: Envisioning a Post-Peak World years ago, but I felt like I should snap this book off Amazon as well — more as a back-handed way to tip the guy for the years of blogs that I have enjoyed and pondered. Imagine my surprise when the fiction itself was refreshing and different! True, some of his proselytizing was a little closer to the surface of the prose than I might have liked (the bit at the end about different stories, for example). But it takes a measured hand to pull off the non-linear structure, told via flashbacks being recorded into a journal, that he used without spoiling the story. The world-building is imaginative, if a bit limited in scope, and Greer seems to like building his characters by showing rather than telling. I might liked to have lived in Trey's head a bit more than we're allowed given the narrative devices used, but you definitely get the picture. Overall though, I really liked the book. The whole dystopia trope is a bit weather-beaten these days, but it's refreshing to read about a world post-collapse which isn't sulky, overly negative, or missing the point entirely.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laylah Hunter

    There are some places where the didactic tone gets a little too strong -- this novel is absolutely an extension of Greer's nonfiction on peak oil and the future of technology -- but mostly the story carries that weight pretty well. And there are some philosophical moments that are really beautiful. ...Also I can't remember if I've ever read another book with a major intersex character who gets treated this well by the narrative. There are some places where the didactic tone gets a little too strong -- this novel is absolutely an extension of Greer's nonfiction on peak oil and the future of technology -- but mostly the story carries that weight pretty well. And there are some philosophical moments that are really beautiful. ...Also I can't remember if I've ever read another book with a major intersex character who gets treated this well by the narrative.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Anderson

    Star’s Reach follows Trey, a ruinman who scraps pre-war buildings in a post apocalyptic future, from the relative comfort of his ordinary life through a winding search for, essentially, the Lost City of Atlantis of his time. Along this journey he accrues a number of friends and followers, and sees countless cities, and discovers some of the biggest questions of his age, though whether or not he can find the answers to those questions hangs over him throughout the book. I would normally write a re Star’s Reach follows Trey, a ruinman who scraps pre-war buildings in a post apocalyptic future, from the relative comfort of his ordinary life through a winding search for, essentially, the Lost City of Atlantis of his time. Along this journey he accrues a number of friends and followers, and sees countless cities, and discovers some of the biggest questions of his age, though whether or not he can find the answers to those questions hangs over him throughout the book. I would normally write a review focusing on how engaging the plot was, or how much I loved the characters, but Star’s Reach isn’t that sort of book. From page twenty, you pretty much know what to expect from the plot; there aren’t any twists and turns, just unanswered questions. And while two of the characters on this journey with Trey are “special” in that they’re very different from what you or I would expect, what they are matters far more than who they are deep down. That makes this a milleau book. I normally don’t like milleau books. What’s more, I rarely enjoy a book with a narrator, and this story is told in, essentially, journal articles written by Trey after they reach their destination. Despite two writing styles I don’t normally dig, I breezed right through this book. But why? I’ve been mulling this over for a few weeks at this point, and I think I now know. Trey, while a likeable, believable, and realistic fellow, is rather bland. I actually think this works perfectly with him being a narrator. Part of the reason why narration so often rubs me the wrong way is that the narrator is trying too hard to be funny, or creepy, or cool, and I can’t submerge myself in the story for how self-aware the narration is. Trey just tells his story. He sometimes loops back and forth or gets off topic, but you never get the feeling that he’s worried about what his readers will think of him. It gives the story an incredibly realistic vibe, which plays into the book’s other strength: The world is so detailed, so well thought out, so interesting and so realistic that, despite a lack of personable characters or a really deep and thought-provoking plot, I was endlessly curious about the next town, or how one story he tells is going to connect to the main story. It doesn’t hurt that it has a vaguely Fallout feel to it. This journal-like reflection as the means of telling the story has its downsides, though. There was almost no tension in the book because you know that he’ll reach his objective from, essentially, page one. That also means that there’s no reason to worry about him getting killed or maimed. He will get where he’s going, it’s just a matter of how. The fact that idle curiosity was the main thing keeping me reading did affect how I read. For example, with the Library at Mount Char, I’d read for hours, an unholy compulsion preventing me from putting down the book and just going to bed already. Star’s Reach I’d read for an hour, then put down and do something else, then pick it back up a few hours later and read another ten pages, then call it quits for the day. Other times I’d be in the middle of reading a paragraph only to find my mind wandering, so I’d call it quits. I always knew that I’d be picking the book back up, though, and sure enough, upon next read, the paragraph that I couldn’t focus on would be interesting again. I was happy enough with this approach, until the end. I won’t spoil anything, but Trey spends some time reminiscing about what happened to him throughout the story. In any other book, it’d be a sweet, nostalgic moment, even for the readers. The problem was, though, that the entire book is a summary, a long bit of reminiscing. We never feel like we’re walking beside him on his journey, because he’s merely telling us the most interesting bits of what happened to him, many years after they happened. So it was only at the end, when he reminisces about specific events that we never really got to experience ourselves, that I realized I felt like something was missing. I wonder how Star’s Reach would be if, instead of a single book spanning many years, the author slowed down and actually allowed us to be in those moments with Trey. He overcomes so much in this book that it would be easy to turn it into two—or three—books. And if the point of view switched to third-person limited, then we would feel every moment of terror, or those moments where it seemed like all was lost, making the reward of Trey reaching his objective all the more satisfying and engaging for us as readers. But at the same time, perhaps that version of this same story would be trash. There’s no way to know. Star’s Reach is a very solid 4-star for me, which is rare. My feelings about most books, plotted out against time on a graph, would look a bit like an EKG reading. Star’s Reach is a flat line, a consistent book in approach and quality, which seems rare these days.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Damian Macrae

    Not bad, great premise (and all too believable unfortunately) but let down by the style of storytelling. It was all told in flashback form by the protagonist jumping all over the place time wise. IMO it would have been so much better told in chronological order, and with chapters from more characters point of view. Especially since the lead character is a bit of genre trope (smart, great with the ladies, awesome at everything he does kinda guy). Having said all that, I read it pretty quick and fo Not bad, great premise (and all too believable unfortunately) but let down by the style of storytelling. It was all told in flashback form by the protagonist jumping all over the place time wise. IMO it would have been so much better told in chronological order, and with chapters from more characters point of view. Especially since the lead character is a bit of genre trope (smart, great with the ladies, awesome at everything he does kinda guy). Having said all that, I read it pretty quick and found the setting very compelling. Pity about the cardboard character(s).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Sells

    Believable... This is one of the more believable SF stories I've read. Having been a shipbreaker in past years allowed me to relate quite deeply with the ruinmen. The scenarios and circumstances described in this story are not only possible... But highly probable! We as a species are doing exactly and enthusiastically the things that could and should lead to just the world depicted here. Good reading. Necessary reading. Believable... This is one of the more believable SF stories I've read. Having been a shipbreaker in past years allowed me to relate quite deeply with the ruinmen. The scenarios and circumstances described in this story are not only possible... But highly probable! We as a species are doing exactly and enthusiastically the things that could and should lead to just the world depicted here. Good reading. Necessary reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris Hall

    Star's Reach was the first work of fiction by JMG I attempted to read. He's a writer I respect a lot and whose non-fiction about the slow collapse of civilization (e.g. the Long Descent & The Ecotechnic Future) has deeply affected me, so I thought his fiction might've also hit the same spot. I didn't get past 40%. But more on that further down. I really liked the ideas in this book: for example, the fact that the alien message, though apparently successfully received, was impossible to translate, Star's Reach was the first work of fiction by JMG I attempted to read. He's a writer I respect a lot and whose non-fiction about the slow collapse of civilization (e.g. the Long Descent & The Ecotechnic Future) has deeply affected me, so I thought his fiction might've also hit the same spot. I didn't get past 40%. But more on that further down. I really liked the ideas in this book: for example, the fact that the alien message, though apparently successfully received, was impossible to translate, or at least that's what the legend said; or the ruinman "initation rite" involved giving a handshake to a robot. Clever little ideas like that were lots of fun. The best part of the book, and my favorite part in many books like this one, was trying to piece together what happened to the old world. Star's Reach doesn't spoonfeed you the hints, but isn't too cryptic on the history either. Some people don't like it when science fiction goes heavy on the specifics, but as an alt history fan, I don't like it when the history is completely ignored or left to the reader's imagination. These parts are often what makes or breaks the narrative for me as far as believability goes. In that regard, JMG gets full points. Unfortunately, I had got bored before I reached the middle of the story. I think it was the characters, esp. the protagonist -- they all felt little more than world-building devices, and even though the world-building itself was wholesome and entertaining, the plot didn't grip me enough to keep my interest to the end. Also, as a non-American I was kind of lost sometimes when it came to the geography of mid-3rd-millennium Meriga. It could be that I was trying to connect the placenames with real names I may or may not have known. I'm sorry to say I couldn't push myself to finish Star's Reach - thus the 2 stars. However, I might try reading some of JMG's other stories in the future -- e.g. Retrotopia.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    What will happen if we do nothing to halt our dependence on fossil fuels? In this novel of speculative fiction, John Michael Greer sets out what he think might come to pass. From the viewpoint of four hundred years in our future, there are some devastating consequences for the east coast, and the west is a complete unknown, cut off from the rest of the country by a vast desert. There is an entire class of workers called 'ruin men' who mine the metals left in the earth after the destruction. When What will happen if we do nothing to halt our dependence on fossil fuels? In this novel of speculative fiction, John Michael Greer sets out what he think might come to pass. From the viewpoint of four hundred years in our future, there are some devastating consequences for the east coast, and the west is a complete unknown, cut off from the rest of the country by a vast desert. There is an entire class of workers called 'ruin men' who mine the metals left in the earth after the destruction. When an opportunity shows up for the recovery of an abandoned astronomical site, our main ruin man Trey sets out, mostly on foot accompanied only by his 'prentice', Berry. The plot thickens and draws the reader in easily. The only drawbacks are the modified place-names (Shanuga = Chattanooga; Troy = Detroit) which are actually proof of Greers genius in the details of crafting this USA of the future, but are sometimes hard to decipher in order to keep up with the landscape the characters travel over. Greer also reveals his opinions on the matter of UFO's, giving warning to those who think our only hope is for something more than human to save us from ourselves. A satisfying read!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris Gropp

    Ever since Western civilization learned to extract raw energy from the millions of years of fossilized sunlight stored, as if by destiny, for us underground; science fiction has imagined a future of increasing human control over energy resources. That is perhaps natural: today we appear superhuman: we fly or converse around the world, the basic needs of life are mostly an afterthought, and speed along unnaturally planar and solid geometrical spaces called "freeways" is the standard. "Freeways" d Ever since Western civilization learned to extract raw energy from the millions of years of fossilized sunlight stored, as if by destiny, for us underground; science fiction has imagined a future of increasing human control over energy resources. That is perhaps natural: today we appear superhuman: we fly or converse around the world, the basic needs of life are mostly an afterthought, and speed along unnaturally planar and solid geometrical spaces called "freeways" is the standard. "Freeways" delightfully represents our zeitgeist now than more than any word. For the middle classes of the developed industrial world, all matter of freeways are nothing less than reality. So it's perhaps sensible to imagine a future in which exponential growth, like an investment, a debt, a population, or physical control of energy, will continue as it has - it's delightful, safe, liberating, actualizing - until some thousands of years in the future, or tomorrow, we travel throughout the galaxy, by some means as yet only imaginable. "All that we conceive is possible," to paraphrase Wittgenstein, certainly makes it seem so, and history so far has not denied us. Star Wars and Star Trek imagine a future of some future magical energy source allowing beyond light-speed travel. Stargate describes another means: travel through wormholes. The Dune series by Frank Herbert imagines a drug-induced ability to "fold space." For most sci-fi writers, as it is for the economists, it doesn't matter how we continue to grow, but it is a given that we will continue to grow - and specifically, in our mastery of matter and energy. As a practical matter, to imagine a world that is human transcendence - a kind of final completion of nature embodied in Man - mentally folding space is all that is needed. So, as we watch now the world warming and weather becoming increasingly extreme, as homes along the Gulf Coast become uninsurable and the west simultaneously burns and floods; as the old political contracts that were based on continued economic growth in capitalist countries erode - specifically, the erosion of the middle class in America - comes a Sci Fi novel that is in a curiously minority company: a science fiction novel that imagines physical and energetic limits. Imagining a significantly altered natural world that has smacked humankind upside the head with limits to growth is the main character of Star's Reach. Which is not to say that the characters of the novel play stooge roles, taking a back seat to technology or other worlds, as is often the case in science fiction. While the characters are not richly adorned with complexity like those of a Hemingway or Tolstoy novel; true to the science fiction genre, the characters of Star's Reach represent one kind of human adaptation to a physical reality, which is arguably the center of Science Fiction's purview. How do people live in all the myriad places we can go, with all of that energy harnessed under our control? Star's Reach imagines the most-likely future based on forecasts for future available energy resources and the climate that results from their consumption, and these forecasts are the basis for the setting. The setting is an America (called "Meriga") with flooded coastlines (Memphis is the largest city and a coastal port town) of mostly-abandoned cities being eaten up (aka "salvaged") for various resources by those who have been lucky enough to be born after environmental pollutants have drastically reduced fertility. In Meriga (roughly between the Missippi and Appalachia, the Great Lakes and the Gulf), the Gaia and woman-centered religion is solely officiated by women and the ruling class is a "Circle" of child-bearing women (a meaningful geometrical symbology contrasting with the Cross which suggests infinite spatial extension). It's a world of foot-travel, slow time, hard and dangerous work, circuses, travelling musicians and stage players, monsoon seasons occupied mostly with quietude and free loving, hasty public executions by law enforcement - under the watchful eye of the priestesses - for using fossil fuels for any reason. All of these elements of setting make the novel seem like a kind of pastiche of historical periods - some modern and technical, some pre-industrial, and some - such as the matriarchal fertility Circle, the Gaia religion, the prohibitions against fossil fuels, and much else - original and appropriately so. The plot of the story I will leave for the reader to discover (the only spoiler I will disclose is that it does involve space aliens, and they still cannot save us from ourselves); but although this work is fiction, factually and scientifically based forecasts for climate and energy are fundamental to creating not only setting but plot of the world of Star's Reach. Sci Fi has always been a curious blending of fact and fiction, but for the most part, the writers of the genre have continued to imagine humankind as having magical or pseudo-magical and loosely scientifically based "powers." So it will be interesting to see how this sci-fi novel is received. It does not describe humans with power; rather, it describes a humanity that is struggling to adapt to altered climate, resource scarcity, pollution - in other words, a humanity not only diminished in power (even to the level of the ability to reproduce) but also acutely aware of being responsible for its own diminution. Will readers turn to the pages of this novel? As our culture's shared history of growth of power begins to be contradicted by the continued evidence of limits - as changing climate presents limits and scarcity of resources presents limits - it seems likely that readers will turn to Star's Reach as among the first of a new sci-fi genre. Art imitates life: central to the experience of the past century is the power and control. The future will be an experience where the Earth reasserts, as it were, her power and control over mankind. It is easy to see Star's Reach as being a seminal work toward re-imagining humankind's relationship to her.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pacific Lee

    The tale starts off centuries after the collapse of America. Greer seems to have a fantastic understanding of how myths and legends are created. The world is very believable, as is the lore/traditions, the superstitions, the various power structures and institutions… He builds the world using his knowledge of what happens following the collapse of real civilizations, and what will be unique to ours (such as radiation and vast ruins). I read many of his non-fiction books which were great reads. I The tale starts off centuries after the collapse of America. Greer seems to have a fantastic understanding of how myths and legends are created. The world is very believable, as is the lore/traditions, the superstitions, the various power structures and institutions… He builds the world using his knowledge of what happens following the collapse of real civilizations, and what will be unique to ours (such as radiation and vast ruins). I read many of his non-fiction books which were great reads. I am pleasantly surprised to see how good his fiction is, too. A lot of the material he covers in his other books appears in story-form as a part of the world-building. The timeline can be confusing at times, as it is in the first-person perspective that goes back and forth in time – but it becomes more navigable as you get used to it. This could have done well as a trilogy (I wish there was more!), fantastic read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alec Mceachran

    Stars Reach is story of one man's journey of discovery through America circa 2800. The setting is a quasi-medieval culture, struggling to recover from the collapse of modern civilization, torn apart by climate change, resource scarcity,and war. The narrative creaks at times, but is only ever the vehicle for it's broader narrative themes: that consumerism and tech-optimism are the great follies of our time; that modern civilization is doomed to fall. Stars Reach is story of one man's journey of discovery through America circa 2800. The setting is a quasi-medieval culture, struggling to recover from the collapse of modern civilization, torn apart by climate change, resource scarcity,and war. The narrative creaks at times, but is only ever the vehicle for it's broader narrative themes: that consumerism and tech-optimism are the great follies of our time; that modern civilization is doomed to fall.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Womack

    A fine post-apocalypse book; interesting and novel in all three acts, and a great evocation of how big America is when you're criss-crossing it on foot. Some extruded fantasy issues (the Gaia Priestesses, and a fetishisation of motherhood that's much more heartening than the Handmaiden's Tale), some interesting bouncing around time, really a very good read. A fine post-apocalypse book; interesting and novel in all three acts, and a great evocation of how big America is when you're criss-crossing it on foot. Some extruded fantasy issues (the Gaia Priestesses, and a fetishisation of motherhood that's much more heartening than the Handmaiden's Tale), some interesting bouncing around time, really a very good read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Harris

    Star’s Reach is an interesting work, one that succeeds for the most part in spite of it’s didactic origins and rather hoary sci-fi storytelling. The world it creates, of “Mergia” some centuries after industrial civilization’s collapse and falls, is both a rather “hard” sci-fi take on the future and a rollicking fantasy quest. The world that Greer envisions our ancestors in the United States and Canada living in is one not very different from the bulk of human life in prior centuries; tenant farm Star’s Reach is an interesting work, one that succeeds for the most part in spite of it’s didactic origins and rather hoary sci-fi storytelling. The world it creates, of “Mergia” some centuries after industrial civilization’s collapse and falls, is both a rather “hard” sci-fi take on the future and a rollicking fantasy quest. The world that Greer envisions our ancestors in the United States and Canada living in is one not very different from the bulk of human life in prior centuries; tenant farmers scraping together a living off the land and only occasionally going as far as the nearest market town; hereditary leaders (Presdens and Jennels) occasionally going to war against other states, travel and communication are limited and no one really knows what things are like across the great deserts to the west, or across the Lantic. Of course, Trey, our narrator, is cut from a different cloth and leaves his farming family to join the Ruinmen, a guild dedicated to harvesting needed resources from the decayed remnants of the past, delving into these dungeon-like spaces to pull out copper wires, steel, and, occasionally, secrets of the past. Trey finds one such secret and must contend with jealous rival guilds, noble jennels, and the eye of the Priestesses, a matriarchal religious authority ever vigilant in making sure that the mistakes of the past do not arise again to allow humans to rise above their stations. As he travels the land, forming a party of fellow adventurers to venture into the desert west of Cansidi to locate the lost ruins of a last project to communicate with beings from another world, I was fascinated in trying to figure out where they were by the garbled names of the towns, rivers, and places they visit (Troy = Detroit, Cisnaddi = Cincinnati, Cansidi = Kansas City). The only one I really couldn’t decipher was Melumi, home of the Versty, staffed by Scholars, a female caste dedicated to preserving and protecting the knowledge of the past; (turns out it was Bloomington, Indiana). While the story and characters were fun, they kept to pretty well worn sci-fi/fantasy tropes, even with the framing narrative of Trey explaining his life up to the point of his great discovery, and it is the world is what really fascinated me. Seeing how the face of the continent changed with climate change (Memfis, i.e., Memphis, now the greatest city on the continent, is a port town on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico), what technologies have survived (radios, limited electricity), how culture has evolved (a nature revering Gaia religion is now the main faith, a reaction to the great catastrophes of industry and overpopulation of history) kept me going. On the other hand, Greer, a “peak oil blogger” and pundit, can come across as a bit preachy, and perhaps romanticizes this “simpler” world a bit as well, though there are still plenty of grey areas in Meriga. Still, a thought provoking and entertaining read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    Just was not really happy with the writting just kind of plodded along. Even though I liked the Mam Gaia future world of ruinmen deconstructing all steel reinfirced buildings for salvage. Thought the contact with aliens was just too stupid could barely finish. The sex scenes were juvenile...feel sorry for author.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Four hundred or so years from now, the landscape of North America has changed dramatically. Memfis, a port city on the Gulf of Meyco, is the largest city in Meriga, if not in the world; ruinmen and their guilds combine urban exploration with resource mining, turning rebar and I-beams from decrepit structures into much needed raw materials; and people still remember stories about the times a half-millennium before when their ancestors not only spoke with beings from other worlds, but landed on a Four hundred or so years from now, the landscape of North America has changed dramatically. Memfis, a port city on the Gulf of Meyco, is the largest city in Meriga, if not in the world; ruinmen and their guilds combine urban exploration with resource mining, turning rebar and I-beams from decrepit structures into much needed raw materials; and people still remember stories about the times a half-millennium before when their ancestors not only spoke with beings from other worlds, but landed on a few of those worlds themselves. In this setting, Greer tells the story (in a voice at times reminiscent of Huck Finn's) of one of these ruinmen, Trey sunna Gwen; the ancient map he discovered in the hands of a mummified corpse deep in a ruin in Shanuga, Tinisi; Star's Reach, the place the map took him and his friends, where earlier human beings had indeed communicated with extraterrestrials; and the larger world in which this voyage of discovery unfolds. Greer includes a painfully ironic comment on the role of today's science fiction in perpetuating what he calls the Myth of Progress, and his acceptance of the reality of intelligent extraterrestrial life is tempered by a sobering revelation from the galactic community (view spoiler)[: that all technologically advanced species out there have experienced similar resource overdrafts and civilizational collapses as those facing 21st century H. sapiens, and that, in spite of all of the advances of all of these species, FTL interstellar travel remains an impossibility. What does exist could be described as an interstellar community of ham radio enthusiasts who endure lifetime-long lags between broadcasts. (hide spoiler)]

  15. 4 out of 5

    Al Sevcik

    Time: About 2800 AD. Place: Middle US (As the US was before the collapse of industrial civilization hundreds of years before.) For centuries a myth, or rumor, or hypothesis has circulated about Star’s Reach, a secret pre-collapse project to find and communicate with extra-terrestrial intelligences. If there ever was such a project its site has been lost over time. However, Trey, a “ruinman” whose trade it is to find and dismantle ruins for salvage happens upon a clue. The novel is about his sea Time: About 2800 AD. Place: Middle US (As the US was before the collapse of industrial civilization hundreds of years before.) For centuries a myth, or rumor, or hypothesis has circulated about Star’s Reach, a secret pre-collapse project to find and communicate with extra-terrestrial intelligences. If there ever was such a project its site has been lost over time. However, Trey, a “ruinman” whose trade it is to find and dismantle ruins for salvage happens upon a clue. The novel is about his search and what happens when he actually finds Star’s Reach. (This is not a spoiler. The find takes place early in the book.) The writing is good with unexpected plot twists that keep the pages turning. An interesting and fun book to read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Grant Foster

    Star's Reach is very well conceived. It has a lot of different elements to it that combine in surprising and gratifying ways. It's a quest story, with Star's Reach serving as part myth, a la the Holy Grail, and as a real place which holds the ultimate human scientific discovery. Greer describes a plausible, and therefore believable future when the industrial world has faded but left it's artifacts. It's a first person narrative from the perspective of a ruinman, an actual job title from the 25th Star's Reach is very well conceived. It has a lot of different elements to it that combine in surprising and gratifying ways. It's a quest story, with Star's Reach serving as part myth, a la the Holy Grail, and as a real place which holds the ultimate human scientific discovery. Greer describes a plausible, and therefore believable future when the industrial world has faded but left it's artifacts. It's a first person narrative from the perspective of a ruinman, an actual job title from the 25th century, who finds a hint at the location of Star's Reach and sets out to find it four centuries after anyone has known its location.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This was a fun read. I liked the characters and cared about their lives, and it was interesting to imagine the world 400 years into the future.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meck

    Fascinating to imagine Earth and human life in the year 2800-ish - after climate disaster and the collapse of industrial capitalism.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bob Ryskamp

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nada Finn

  21. 4 out of 5

    Korellyn

  22. 4 out of 5

    James

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Rice

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elise

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Johnson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nsd

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bird

  28. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Beran

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Peacock

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Sandrik

  32. 4 out of 5

    Chris Gropp

  33. 4 out of 5

    John

  34. 4 out of 5

    Fred

  35. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Allen

  36. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

  37. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  38. 5 out of 5

    Mason

  39. 4 out of 5

    Kamran

  40. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  41. 4 out of 5

    Lavena Staten

  42. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Evans

  43. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Thornton

  44. 5 out of 5

    Nik

  45. 4 out of 5

    Jon

  46. 4 out of 5

    Chris Riedy

  47. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  48. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  49. 5 out of 5

    Erik Hesselink

  50. 4 out of 5

    Fantods

  51. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  52. 5 out of 5

    Mathew Woods

  53. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  54. 4 out of 5

    Jolene

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