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Justice League of America, Vol. 2: The Lightning Saga

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Number-one bestselling novelist Brad Meltzer joins forces with top comics writer Geoff Johns for this incredible graphic novel bringing together the DC Universes top super-teams! Two of DCs biggest super-teamsthe Justice League of America, featuring Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and more, and the Justice Society of America, including Hawkman, Wildcat and othersjoin forces Number-one bestselling novelist Brad Meltzer joins forces with top comics writer Geoff Johns for this incredible graphic novel bringing together the DC Universes top super-teams! Two of DCs biggest super-teamsthe Justice League of America, featuring Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and more, and the Justice Society of America, including Hawkman, Wildcat and othersjoin forces in this stunning hardcover volume! The JLA has discovered that several members of the Legion of Super-Heroes from the 31st century are in the present. With the help of the JSA, Superman and his team must track down all seven Legionnaires to discover why these heroes of the future have traveled back in time!


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Number-one bestselling novelist Brad Meltzer joins forces with top comics writer Geoff Johns for this incredible graphic novel bringing together the DC Universes top super-teams! Two of DCs biggest super-teamsthe Justice League of America, featuring Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and more, and the Justice Society of America, including Hawkman, Wildcat and othersjoin forces Number-one bestselling novelist Brad Meltzer joins forces with top comics writer Geoff Johns for this incredible graphic novel bringing together the DC Universes top super-teams! Two of DCs biggest super-teamsthe Justice League of America, featuring Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and more, and the Justice Society of America, including Hawkman, Wildcat and othersjoin forces in this stunning hardcover volume! The JLA has discovered that several members of the Legion of Super-Heroes from the 31st century are in the present. With the help of the JSA, Superman and his team must track down all seven Legionnaires to discover why these heroes of the future have traveled back in time!

30 review for Justice League of America, Vol. 2: The Lightning Saga

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Meltzer continues his ode to the Justice League of old by doing a JLA / JSA crossover. Back in the days where there was an Earth-1 and Earth-2, I looked forward to these every year. This was almost more of a Legion of Super-Heroes story as the JLA and JSA go on a quest to find seven LSH members lost in our time. The writing really shines though in the solo stories also included. Walls won an eisner and it's easy to see why. It's a story about Red Arrow and Vixen trapped in a collapsed building. Meltzer continues his ode to the Justice League of old by doing a JLA / JSA crossover. Back in the days where there was an Earth-1 and Earth-2, I looked forward to these every year. This was almost more of a Legion of Super-Heroes story as the JLA and JSA go on a quest to find seven LSH members lost in our time. The writing really shines though in the solo stories also included. Walls won an eisner and it's easy to see why. It's a story about Red Arrow and Vixen trapped in a collapsed building. Gene Ha's art is tremendous. The art feels like it's collapsing in on you as the two are running out of time. Monitor Duty was another fun story as it follows each member as they come on monitor duty. It's a real shame Meltzer didn't stay on the book longer.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    The primary story is roughly a B to B plus. The stories that follow after that aren't as good but some of them are homages to The Justice League of America so definitely they're worth a read. A lot of JLA History within. Comes close to a four star in some ways but not quite. OVERALL GRADE: B The primary story is roughly a B to B plus. The stories that follow after that aren't as good but some of them are homages to The Justice League of America so definitely they're worth a read. A lot of JLA History within. Comes close to a four star in some ways but not quite. OVERALL GRADE: B

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Ok, I thought there would be more to this. This covers the 2nd Volume of Meltzer's Justice League and the main story arc is "The Lightning Saga" and my volume had three additional issues of Justice League America. There in lies the problem I had with this volume. But first, let's look at the main story: The "Lightning Saga" if viewed by itself is a good story. A 4 star (possibly 5 star depending on the conclusion of the full story) adventure/mystery that Meltzer seems adept at penning. What is go Ok, I thought there would be more to this. This covers the 2nd Volume of Meltzer's Justice League and the main story arc is "The Lightning Saga" and my volume had three additional issues of Justice League America. There in lies the problem I had with this volume. But first, let's look at the main story: The "Lightning Saga" if viewed by itself is a good story. A 4 star (possibly 5 star depending on the conclusion of the full story) adventure/mystery that Meltzer seems adept at penning. What is going on? The Legion of Super-Heroes from the 31st Century is appearing in our time stream. From Karate Kid appearing and subsequently fighting Batman in a rather cool scene, to finding Dreamgirl inside Arkham Asylum, this starts as a "find the missing Legion member" adventure. But, knowing Meltzer, there is more to it. Turns out the Legion has returned to make some changes in the future and have not shared this little tidbit with the Justice League. This is the mystery part of the story as the motives and the mission of the Legion turn out to be quite serious. So far so good. Then, the main story ends. I shall not spoil it (even if this is an older tale), but with the conclusion and the big reveal complete, there were still quite a few plots left to be dealt with. When I did some research I found that this "entire" story completes if one reads several other comics ranging from Booster Gold to Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds and Superman: Last Stand of New Krypton. Ummm ok, I understand the fetish, and naked greed, that fuels extending a story into other series to "flesh it out". That is not my complaint. My complaint is the half-wits that put together this collection neglected to provide those rather crucial issues. Did I like the additional JLA issues? Um sure. But I'd MUCH rather have had crucial issues like: Final Crisis: Legion of Three Worlds #3- where you find out WHO the person they REALLY were rescuing was. Action Comics #858–863- where it's explained why the Legion never visited Superman again after the first Crisis. Adventure Comics #504-506; 509-510- where the Lightning Saga is supposed to reach its penultimate with the return of another famous character. These are rather hugely important stories left out of a "collection". Had the collection ended with just the Lightning Saga as presented in JLA and JSA, then fine. But to include the additional stories without focusing on adding the stories that really are REQUIRED to finish the main arc would have been a wiser choice? Really? Thus 3 stars for this volume. The Saga itself is interesting enough where I shall likely rea the rest of it. I shall also need to refresh my whole Crisis storyline again. At some point.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    "Walls", the story of Red Arrow and Vixen trapped in a demolished building sinking in the Potomac, is definitely one of the top ten best single issue stories ever written. "Walls", the story of Red Arrow and Vixen trapped in a demolished building sinking in the Potomac, is definitely one of the top ten best single issue stories ever written.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Holy shit was that bad. There is NO THREAT, the situation doesn't get any worse. The tension is not elevated. The Legion of Superheroes have come back to save Wally West, but to do so they have to sacrifice one of their members, so they must make sure that this time line's super heroes does not stop that sacrifice. This is revealed in the last issue so all the issues before it read like the two greatest superhero teams in DC are punching VISIONS for two strait days. That's right they fight illus Holy shit was that bad. There is NO THREAT, the situation doesn't get any worse. The tension is not elevated. The Legion of Superheroes have come back to save Wally West, but to do so they have to sacrifice one of their members, so they must make sure that this time line's super heroes does not stop that sacrifice. This is revealed in the last issue so all the issues before it read like the two greatest superhero teams in DC are punching VISIONS for two strait days. That's right they fight illusions on multiple occasions (and the best part is that the figure out the first one right away, but are fooled by the second one, when they should be expecting it). That being said Melzer does have some fantastic moments. When he juxtaposes multiple scenes and has different characters giving the same narration... oh is it good. And the One Shot with Red Arrow and Vixen trapped in the Watergate hotel... which is sinking into the Potomac was AWESOME!!! I think that the Lighting Saga was a cooperate "OK we need an event in order to bring back Wally West and you have a week to write it." And this is what they came up with with out much time to plot or edit.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    This was nowhere near as engaging as the last volume. I found "The Lightning Saga" storyline baffling and confusing to follow. On top of that... I just didn't really care about the Justice Society? Is this why I've never read much on Power Girl? That team just didn't grab my attention and they took up the brunt of that storyline. Anyway, the issue with Roy and Mari was really well done. The art worked well for it, I liked the focus on Mari's guilt and her struggle with her powers going wonky. (A This was nowhere near as engaging as the last volume. I found "The Lightning Saga" storyline baffling and confusing to follow. On top of that... I just didn't really care about the Justice Society? Is this why I've never read much on Power Girl? That team just didn't grab my attention and they took up the brunt of that storyline. Anyway, the issue with Roy and Mari was really well done. The art worked well for it, I liked the focus on Mari's guilt and her struggle with her powers going wonky. (Although... I would think drawing power from metahumans could be equally as useful as her animal powers). The last issue was back to showing us what the League did outside of big battles, which was somewhat interesting. I don't care one way or the other about Roy's crush on Kendra. I was a bit confused as to whether they were implying he was in love with her? Because I don't think enough time has passed for that to be the case. So, even with one great issue with Mari and Roy, this is definitely not a recommend for me. Definitely a step down from the last one.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    I am a big fan of both the JSA and the JLA, both in their various incarnations over the years. This crossover team up story is very well done with above average art and plot. This Very recommended

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    While the main five-chapter plot was just okay (although both the artwork - there were some great two-page spreads - and the deft handling of over two dozen involved characters were above average) it was the three unrelated short stories that close the book that made it worthwhile. Walls, Monitor Duty, and Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow were, although different in style and content, uniformly excellent as a finale. Also, someone somewhere lost a bet. The initial story cried out for Power Girl (but yo While the main five-chapter plot was just okay (although both the artwork - there were some great two-page spreads - and the deft handling of over two dozen involved characters were above average) it was the three unrelated short stories that close the book that made it worthwhile. Walls, Monitor Duty, and Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow were, although different in style and content, uniformly excellent as a finale. Also, someone somewhere lost a bet. The initial story cried out for Power Girl (but you could also substitute Vixen, Dream Girl, Dawnstar, etc.) to use the old Zucker/Abrahams/Zucker (see Naked Gun 2 1/2 ) punchline set-up "Is this some kind of bust?"

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    I found The Lightning Saga to be a confusing and uninvolving mess. It's hard to care about any of the characters and the plot isn't particularly gripping. There are so many characters from the Justice League, the Justice Society, and the Legion of Superheroes that don't really get explained, it felt like there was some additional homework that I should've been doing to get everything straight. The last issue about the big three, Superman. Batman, and Wonder Woman, was pretty good but still suffe I found The Lightning Saga to be a confusing and uninvolving mess. It's hard to care about any of the characters and the plot isn't particularly gripping. There are so many characters from the Justice League, the Justice Society, and the Legion of Superheroes that don't really get explained, it felt like there was some additional homework that I should've been doing to get everything straight. The last issue about the big three, Superman. Batman, and Wonder Woman, was pretty good but still suffered from having to know a lot about DC comics history.

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    This book series continues it's standard of excellence. This book series continues it's standard of excellence.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    Happy ending, but pretty boring (and confusing) up to that point.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jacinta Carter

    Because Batman and Superman each have at least 500 movies about themselves, I already knew a lot about them and a fair amount about Wonder Woman. This graphic novel introduced me to several other members of the Justice League, though, which I was very into. My only issue with this one is that they might have tried to fit too many characters into this one, so even with the visuals it was sometimes difficult to follow what was going on with all of the different characters teaming up and running al Because Batman and Superman each have at least 500 movies about themselves, I already knew a lot about them and a fair amount about Wonder Woman. This graphic novel introduced me to several other members of the Justice League, though, which I was very into. My only issue with this one is that they might have tried to fit too many characters into this one, so even with the visuals it was sometimes difficult to follow what was going on with all of the different characters teaming up and running all over the place.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John Siuntres

    Meltzer at his best So many great stories including the lightning saga. The Eisner winning one shot of red arrow and vixen trapped underground with Gene Ha art is a classic too. This is a great volume.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zoidberg

    Great nostalgia from the legion of superheroes

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Yes, the story is convoluted. That's almost to be expected when you have more than one author; here, we're gifted with novelist Brad Meltzer and comic writer Geoff Johns. The story involves three super teams: the Justice League of America, the Justice Society of America, and the Legion of Super-Heroes (from the 31st century). Seven of the Legion have been trapped in time in different areas and it's up to the JSA and JLA to determine where and why. The artwork by Ed Benes is terrific, and the end Yes, the story is convoluted. That's almost to be expected when you have more than one author; here, we're gifted with novelist Brad Meltzer and comic writer Geoff Johns. The story involves three super teams: the Justice League of America, the Justice Society of America, and the Legion of Super-Heroes (from the 31st century). Seven of the Legion have been trapped in time in different areas and it's up to the JSA and JLA to determine where and why. The artwork by Ed Benes is terrific, and the ending is worth it. Also, pick this up for one of the best written and illustrated comic stories ever: "Walls" by Brad Meltzer with claustrophobia-inducing pictures by the very talented Gene Ha. Re-read in 2016: This is a strange story. Brad Meltzer, Geoff Johns, and several good artists and pencillers worked together on it, but in the end, it’s a bit confusing and unfulfilling. There’s no villain in the story, but midway through, we get a panel featuring three of DC’s worst (including the Ultra-Humanite and Ocean Master) and then they are never seen nor heard from again. Why? The story begins with a man named Val Armorr, who is a member of the Legion of Super-Heroes, a 31st century band of teenagers with special powers. He’s trapped in this timeline with seven other members of the Legion, and the JLA and JSA must find them all and see what’s going on. And that’s part of the major problem. We’re never sure what’s going on. We know they’re here and we’re told that they’re trying to save someone (or something), but nothing is fully realized or explained. The fun comes in watching the two superhero groups team up. The ending is pretty good, but overall the story falls flat, and that’s surprising when it’s coming from two great writers. The standalone story “Walls” is one of the best I’ve read (Brad Meltzer wrote this one), and the artwork is amazing. It involves Red Arrow and Vixen being trapped in a collapsing (or collapsed) building. Gene Ha’s work here is terrific. Get the book if only for this story. The other two stories, “Monitor Duty” and “Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow” show the JLA as more of an extended family than a group of superpowered beings. They eat, play, laugh, love, and fight with each other regularly. They also routinely save the universe. The latter story shows the growing bond between Clark, Diana, and Bruce and how this bond is nearly severed. All in all, a good read for those who love the JLA.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    I love the Justice League. It is hard for me to read a book with the Justice League and not like it. I love looking into the lives of my favorite super hero team and being that fly on the wall. This book, like all the Justice League stuff I read, has great team dynamics. The book was very well written and very fun. The artwork is pretty good as well. In all honesty there is not a lot of action, as the league tries to stop some heroes from the future from doing ... I ain't telling. You have to rea I love the Justice League. It is hard for me to read a book with the Justice League and not like it. I love looking into the lives of my favorite super hero team and being that fly on the wall. This book, like all the Justice League stuff I read, has great team dynamics. The book was very well written and very fun. The artwork is pretty good as well. In all honesty there is not a lot of action, as the league tries to stop some heroes from the future from doing ... I ain't telling. You have to read this book with the other volumes for you to enjoy it fully and get the richness of the characters. I love how they are flushing out Red Tornado's character. The scene where Red Tornado has to go do Justice League duty and watch Felix Faust instead of spend time with his family was very good. Especially since he swapped shifts with someone else to create the inconvenience. It shows that even our heroes have human qualities we can connect with. The last thing I love about this book as well (as all the JLA books) is that DC knows how to use their insignificant characters so well in these group settings. I love how they take the nobodys and make them important to the team. I honestly feel DC has the best characters and team of writers out there for the big publishers. My gripes about this book are that the stories are way too rich to try and fit into such a puny graphic novel. We need a much more substantial book. I am willing to pay for the extra cost. The last thing, I didn't quite get the last story with Red Arrow and Vixen. I wasn't sure how that fit in with the rest of the book. Cheers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Richard Barnes

    Maybe I'm getting old, but surely, just because the target audience for comic books is assumed to be teenage males, is that any excuse for the sheer size and prominence of Power Girl's chest? It doesn't help that there is no villain to speak of, huge chunks of the story require way too much historical background that the casual reader will just not know and that the big reveal/ finale/ whatever is yet another case of a dead hero coming back from the dead. The death of a major character in the supe Maybe I'm getting old, but surely, just because the target audience for comic books is assumed to be teenage males, is that any excuse for the sheer size and prominence of Power Girl's chest? It doesn't help that there is no villain to speak of, huge chunks of the story require way too much historical background that the casual reader will just not know and that the big reveal/ finale/ whatever is yet another case of a dead hero coming back from the dead. The death of a major character in the superhero worlds of DC or Marvel can have no impact whatsoever these days - the fact is that whoever has died will be turning up again within a couple of years as part of yet another "event"! This volume is padded out with a story that elevates this review to two stars - featuring a couple of under-powered heroes trapped in a tiny space in a building that is slowly collapsing around them, and a Superman/ Batman/ Wonder Woman story which treads over the tired old ground of their special bond and how awesomely important they are. While I'm ranting about the sad state of superhero comics - what happened to heroes taking on villains? Why must we have this constant introspective drivel about how these characters feel? Yuck, bring back the fun Justice League International - a bunch of B listers who actually did stuff rather than just save the multi-verse and get all angsty about it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karl Kindt

    These long story arcs in which there is a mystery kept until the end of the arc (and that REALLY is the only story plot element that matters) are getting really really old and formulaic and tiring. The "big secret" in this one allows the writers to let characters act out of character for the entire arc. No spoilers, I promise: The secret kept until the end...there is no reason for it. None. Characters do things they would not normally do so as to provide conflict between them and others. The sec These long story arcs in which there is a mystery kept until the end of the arc (and that REALLY is the only story plot element that matters) are getting really really old and formulaic and tiring. The "big secret" in this one allows the writers to let characters act out of character for the entire arc. No spoilers, I promise: The secret kept until the end...there is no reason for it. None. Characters do things they would not normally do so as to provide conflict between them and others. The secret I am talking around is kept from Superman, but in the end, there was absolutely no reason the people keeping the secret needed to. They say, "He'll understand and forgive us when we're done," but they had just told him what they were doing, he would have helped. This is modern comic storytelling as bad the really dumb formula comics of the distant past, but it has showy art and a seemingly post-modern comment to make. Some modern comic writers ride on the shoulders of giants and do work that even surpasses their predecessors...these writers fell off the shoulders of the giants and into the mud.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This follow up to the story line in "Justice Society of America: the Next Age" takes the Justice League / Justice Society crossover to new heights when authors Brad Meltzer & Geoff Johns also bring in the Legion of Superheroes from the 31st Century. The catch is that the Legion members are not letting even their old friend and honorary member Kal-El (Superman) in on their secret mission. Seven Legion members have been sent back in time for their own secret mission and it looks like they all know This follow up to the story line in "Justice Society of America: the Next Age" takes the Justice League / Justice Society crossover to new heights when authors Brad Meltzer & Geoff Johns also bring in the Legion of Superheroes from the 31st Century. The catch is that the Legion members are not letting even their old friend and honorary member Kal-El (Superman) in on their secret mission. Seven Legion members have been sent back in time for their own secret mission and it looks like they all know that one of them won't be coming back. What is this mission, why are they keeping secrets and how do the LSA, JLA and Legion all interact? You've just gotta read it to see. (Easter Egg: look for the reference to 'Kingdom Come') Fantastic artwork throughout (in different styles) really adds to the story too. Plus, there are a few follow up stories included at the end, which address why this new Justice League looks so different from what we're used to. Oh, and the introduction to the trade graphic novel by Patton Oswalt is great too!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    A lot of characters I was unfamiliar with detracted from my enjoyment of what was an interesting story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Juan

    You ever been in a situation where you were the least qualified in the room, but you still wanted to be involved despite your lack of knowledge? That is the allure of a Brad Meltzerm Geoff Johns and an all star collection of artists, but its what Meltzer brings as a novelist that is so attractive. When he did Identity Crisis i was blown away, so anything with his name on it I went for. Such is the case of this story. You are thrown into something special, because the writing tells you so. The r You ever been in a situation where you were the least qualified in the room, but you still wanted to be involved despite your lack of knowledge? That is the allure of a Brad Meltzerm Geoff Johns and an all star collection of artists, but its what Meltzer brings as a novelist that is so attractive. When he did Identity Crisis i was blown away, so anything with his name on it I went for. Such is the case of this story. You are thrown into something special, because the writing tells you so. The reverence and acknowledgement that Meltzer has for these characters is very evident. He builds from what has been canon from the big fining and charges ahead, but that to me is like advanced calculous, yes, what a feat to actually get that learned, but i would falter because of so much that comes before you reach this plateau. The Justice League, the Society of Justice, the Legion of Super-Heroes, two of those three I am lost about. And within the League the lineups feel wonderfully contemporary with the big=g three just hovering near by. No matter Meltzer and Johns will not dumb their foundations down. They ramp it up and have these themes that are not easy to wrestle. I mean the pacing just picks up and wow you are wrapped up in this whole storyline, even when I don’t honestly know what is going on, but the bits and pieces are familiar enough like a gumbo. Then before you know it it is over. But there is still more left in the trade. How they are attached could be thematic but with the narrative, i know that its there i just can’t figure out the connection. Nevertheless, the stories are so compelling and they pull you to draw connections to what was just read. The Wall story is incredibly emotional and amazing with its powerful ethos. Then the last story, compilation? Hrs the hardest with the core of the big three, with yesterday, today and tomorrow as tabs. Sometimes, excellent authors trump dense comprehension tales. Maybe better readers can make better sense of it than i. This still must be read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    Unfortunately, I think this relies to heavily on previous knowledge of the DC Universe. The main arc in here brings together the JSA and Justice League to investigate something to do with the Legion of Super Heroes. While Meltzer craftily builds both a mystery and possibly history changing event, there's almost no characterization, at least not enough for the casual reader, or even someone who has a low level knowledge of the characters. It's not as accessible as his earlier Identity Crisis, whi Unfortunately, I think this relies to heavily on previous knowledge of the DC Universe. The main arc in here brings together the JSA and Justice League to investigate something to do with the Legion of Super Heroes. While Meltzer craftily builds both a mystery and possibly history changing event, there's almost no characterization, at least not enough for the casual reader, or even someone who has a low level knowledge of the characters. It's not as accessible as his earlier Identity Crisis, which has basically the same structure. The one issue follow-up is a story about Roy and Vixen trapped in a building. It's a standout piece, highlighting the two characters, showcasing both their strength and their weaknesses. My favorite part for sure. This tpb also includes issue #0, which is a reverential recap of the league history in snapshots, primarily from the viewpoint of Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman. Again, the full impact is only felt if you are aware of most of what they are referring to. I guess if you don't know about something, maybe there's enough to intrigue you to find out. Every couple of pages are drawn by a different artist too. Meltzer clearly knows the characters and history and he's able to meld and build-up to something that's satisfying to long-term readers. I'm just not sure it's easy enough and entertaining enough for those who don't have that background.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alek Hill

    "Lightning Saga" was another great follow up to "Infinite Crisis", and is honestly the first time I actually enjoyed the Legion of Superheroes in a story. The story consists of issues 8-10 of Justice League of America and 5-7 of Geoff Johns Justice Society of America. The issues leap-frog each other for a very concise story with beautiful artwork. The Legion's mission is a very heart warming resolution to a moment from Infinite Crisis, but it does twist the knife a bit when it hinted to the resu "Lightning Saga" was another great follow up to "Infinite Crisis", and is honestly the first time I actually enjoyed the Legion of Superheroes in a story. The story consists of issues 8-10 of Justice League of America and 5-7 of Geoff Johns Justice Society of America. The issues leap-frog each other for a very concise story with beautiful artwork. The Legion's mission is a very heart warming resolution to a moment from Infinite Crisis, but it does twist the knife a bit when it hinted to the resurrection of a certain someone. The last two issues of Brad Meltzer's Justice League run are very good. "Walls" was such an intense and realistic story that I would love to see more artists take on. The final issue gives more insight into the characters while also more of a look at the League like in issue 0 "Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow". Meltzer did an incredible job on the Justice League and really made me want to find more if his work.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Agung Ramdani

    justice league of america — the lightning saga first of all brad meltzer + geoff johns creates an art together ugh their minds it amazes me sometime Second the book the motherf*ckin book overall story, art, everythinggg i lived, i breathed for this book Third and once again thank you for introducing me to some new amazing characters i need to find more about legion of superheroes also need to pick up some justice society. And i like the teams blended together even without a threat or some evil vil justice league of america — the lightning saga first of all brad meltzer + geoff johns creates an art together ugh their minds it amazes me sometime Second the book the motherf*ckin book overall story, art, everythinggg i lived, i breathed for this book Third and once again thank you for introducing me to some new amazing characters i need to find more about legion of superheroes also need to pick up some justice society. And i like the teams blended together even without a threat or some evil villainous this books still standout for me in so many ways because i’m a new reader and i get to know all these characters. Ugh I appreciate this book a lot i don’t know what to say.. the only think on my thoughts is THANK YOU GEOFF AND MELTZER

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kym McBride

    I was drawn to this book because of Brad Meltzer. I have read his adult fiction thriller books. I have never been a comic book person, even in my youth. So I wanted to see an 'adult comic book'. What I learned is I AM NOT A COMIC BOOK PERSON. That seems to be a world I can't get my head around. So it would be a great injustice to try and review a book that is not in my color wheel. (LOL made a joke and I didn't know it...." it would be a great injustice..." and the book is called "The Justice Le I was drawn to this book because of Brad Meltzer. I have read his adult fiction thriller books. I have never been a comic book person, even in my youth. So I wanted to see an 'adult comic book'. What I learned is I AM NOT A COMIC BOOK PERSON. That seems to be a world I can't get my head around. So it would be a great injustice to try and review a book that is not in my color wheel. (LOL made a joke and I didn't know it...." it would be a great injustice..." and the book is called "The Justice League of America! LOL) Anyway, I will review the imagery in the book. That, I feel I can have an opinion on. So this is for you...oh, crap. In this comic book world, there is not just one artist/illustrator by a whole group of pencilers, inkers, artists, letterers, colorists.....I guess giving my opinion is going to be harder than I thought! Well, here goes. The cover is beautiful. I love the variation of characters and poses. I love that a woman is the center figure on the cover, and that it is a beloved female superhero, Wonder Woman. So yes, I was drawn to this cover. Whoever did it - good job. One thing though. I know that this is NOT something that a book cover person has control over, but it is a pet peeve. All the stickers that the book stores and libraries (yes, I have a library copy) put all over the books, it blocked out some of the title of the book and on the back they covered up the blurb on the back cover. So maybe artist's need to take that into considering when they make the covers. In this case, the lettering on the cover is from tip of the right side to the tip of the left side, so it would for sure be covered up by stickers. Just a note to think about. The front cover has the image of a variety of characters wrapped around onto the back. Not as interesting, it looked awkward. But at least they didn't attempt to write the blurb on top of all the color images, they put the blurb in a black background column with white print. Legible, thanks. The colors and images were very well done (by whom ever!) I liked the imagery a lot. The content page has a page and 1/2 of all these unique characters (at least to me) all standing around kibitzing with each other. Much like a casual shot of a bunch of people starting to line up for a group shot. I like this and found it intriguing. It appears they are having loose conversations and interesting body language. No voice bubbles. One female character is moving away from a scary looking animal dude. Funny. Later in the book, they actually used that same page that grabbed me and then had all the voice bubbles with what each were saying to each other, that was a treat. Seeing Batman in conversation with a busty (VERY BUSTY) blond while he drinks a cup of tea! Funny! (and he appeared to be staring at her breasts the whole time. ugh) Layout. I LOVED the variety of layout formats used. I have to admit, that I ended up looking up what the actual terms for comic book formats were. So even though I didn't understand the comic book, I did LEARN something from it. Let’s see if I can give you, my reader some education too. The layout in these types of books are called the comic paneling. The usually use a 9 or 6 grid format on a page. They also use Big frames (1/2 page or full page) to show the importance of that frame in the story line. They also use small frames to lead you along in the story. I couldn't find all the names for these layouts, but I will list out some of the layouts that I enjoyed a lot: they intermixed small panels with long -widescreen panels (ones that are narrow and long, sometimes horizontal and others vertical.) I loved the full page panels where they had lots of room to give vivid detailed actions shots. In one entire chapter they used a frame edging that I liked. It had wide screen panels with a ripped edging. The character is trapped under a building, and the ripped edging of the story ADDS to the crushed world in the story line. Brilliant! And when they were bouncing from the trapped area to the above ground scenes, the ripped frame allowed me to know 'where we are now' in the story. So it was a very good way to allow the reader to follow the movement of the story. I really enjoyed the variety of characters and the uniforms and such. Not being in this comic book world, I had no idea who 99% of them were, so it was an enjoyable part of the book. But not a bunch of reality going on here. Every guy had rock hard abs and legs. And not a inch of anything but detail in the costume... Now, for this next part, I have wrestled with my opinion on the women's portrayal in this comic book world. And I know that mostly men read these books....And I will be booed for saying this but WHY DO ALL THE FEMALE CHARACTERS NEED TO BE HAVING ALL THEIR PARTS HANGING OUT INTO THE WORLD? One jump off a building, and those tiny fabrics will give! And the breasts are bad enough but now they have the high cut legs that leave NOTHING to the imagination! Guys....I know....but COME ON. I know you are 'in another world' but don't they have GRAVITY there either? Ugh. Ok. I had my peace. I'll move on. I'm going to rate this book on IMAGERY ALONE. Not the story line, since I just could not follow it. It's like reading a book in a different language. So would I recommend? If you’re a guy? Yes. If you have that kind of brain that can follow this? Yes, if you like imagery that is full of movement (not the breasts, they are cemented in place), but lots of action? Yes. If you don’t get comic book world speak….PASS. But visually pleasing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Max Z

    The eponymous Lightning Saga ends leaving me with mixed feelings but there's some padding after that, too. That book ends a short Meltzer's run but I can't shake off the feeling that this and its prefecessors served as a template to the DC multiverse for years to come. Just like before the focus shifted even more on to the heroes having families and real-people troubles. Storywise JLA finds out that members of the Legion of Super-Heroes came back from the future and live among us with memories lo The eponymous Lightning Saga ends leaving me with mixed feelings but there's some padding after that, too. That book ends a short Meltzer's run but I can't shake off the feeling that this and its prefecessors served as a template to the DC multiverse for years to come. Just like before the focus shifted even more on to the heroes having families and real-people troubles. Storywise JLA finds out that members of the Legion of Super-Heroes came back from the future and live among us with memories lost. The mystery will involve "betrayal of trust for the greater good" that erodes the DC fantasy even further after the controversial Identity Crisis.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tom Malinowski

    This storyline more than 10 years old? Sigh, where did the time go? Spot on writing by Johns and Meltzer as they incorporate the Legion of Super-Heroes post Infinite Crisis by having the Justice League of America team up with the Justice Society of America. That flavor, that feel definitely isn't around today. I really miss the pre-52 era. Maybe one day it can return to that kind of family/historic feel. Anywhoodles, specific Legionnaires are dispersed in the past, but why? Who do they want to b This storyline more than 10 years old? Sigh, where did the time go? Spot on writing by Johns and Meltzer as they incorporate the Legion of Super-Heroes post Infinite Crisis by having the Justice League of America team up with the Justice Society of America. That flavor, that feel definitely isn't around today. I really miss the pre-52 era. Maybe one day it can return to that kind of family/historic feel. Anywhoodles, specific Legionnaires are dispersed in the past, but why? Who do they want to bring back? Good stuff.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matt Reid

    This is a crossover book between Brad Meltzers JLA and Geoff Johns’ JSA, often in my experience crossover stories aren’t worth your time, feeling more like a way to grab more cash, this however I enjoyed. This story draws on DCs history and includes the Legion of Superheroes. The absolute highlight however is the issue in which two members are stuck under a collapsing building. It’s almost painful to read and puts the characters in a horrible scenario, reminding us of the danger these guys put t This is a crossover book between Brad Meltzers JLA and Geoff Johns’ JSA, often in my experience crossover stories aren’t worth your time, feeling more like a way to grab more cash, this however I enjoyed. This story draws on DCs history and includes the Legion of Superheroes. The absolute highlight however is the issue in which two members are stuck under a collapsing building. It’s almost painful to read and puts the characters in a horrible scenario, reminding us of the danger these guys put themselves in. All in all a very good book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Graeme Dunlop

    This is pretty good all the way through, but it's the stories "Walls" and "Monitor Duty" that make this such a pleasure to read. Both stories are pure character development, getting into the hearts and minds of a newly-formed Justice League with members both familiar and new. A great read, and Gene Ha's artwork for "Walls" is something pretty special. This is pretty good all the way through, but it's the stories "Walls" and "Monitor Duty" that make this such a pleasure to read. Both stories are pure character development, getting into the hearts and minds of a newly-formed Justice League with members both familiar and new. A great read, and Gene Ha's artwork for "Walls" is something pretty special.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Roy

    I really enjoyed this one, bringing the JLA, The JSA, and even the Legion together was a fun time. Seeing some of the history of the future return and some of the fun moments, without being overly heavy. I love Grant Morrision's stuff but you need to be a student of all DC to catch everything he does. Brad Meltzer does a good balance here. I really enjoyed this one, bringing the JLA, The JSA, and even the Legion together was a fun time. Seeing some of the history of the future return and some of the fun moments, without being overly heavy. I love Grant Morrision's stuff but you need to be a student of all DC to catch everything he does. Brad Meltzer does a good balance here.

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