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In 1962, in the pages of a comic book slated for cancellation, Stan Lee and Steve Ditko gave birth to one of the most enduring icons in American popular culture - the one and only Amazing Spider-Man! Turning the concept of a super hero on its head, they imbued the young, guilt-ridden Peter Parker with the fantastic powers of an arachnid and the fantastic pressures of an ev In 1962, in the pages of a comic book slated for cancellation, Stan Lee and Steve Ditko gave birth to one of the most enduring icons in American popular culture - the one and only Amazing Spider-Man! Turning the concept of a super hero on its head, they imbued the young, guilt-ridden Peter Parker with the fantastic powers of an arachnid and the fantastic pressures of an everyday teenager. The combination was pure magic. With this Epic Collecti on you can leap into Spider-Man's web-slinging world from the very beginning. COLLECTING: AMAZING FANTASY (1962) 15, AMAZING SPIDERMAN (1963) 1-17, ANNUAL (1964) 1 (AMAZING SPIDER-MAN EPIC COLLECTION VOL. 1


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In 1962, in the pages of a comic book slated for cancellation, Stan Lee and Steve Ditko gave birth to one of the most enduring icons in American popular culture - the one and only Amazing Spider-Man! Turning the concept of a super hero on its head, they imbued the young, guilt-ridden Peter Parker with the fantastic powers of an arachnid and the fantastic pressures of an ev In 1962, in the pages of a comic book slated for cancellation, Stan Lee and Steve Ditko gave birth to one of the most enduring icons in American popular culture - the one and only Amazing Spider-Man! Turning the concept of a super hero on its head, they imbued the young, guilt-ridden Peter Parker with the fantastic powers of an arachnid and the fantastic pressures of an everyday teenager. The combination was pure magic. With this Epic Collecti on you can leap into Spider-Man's web-slinging world from the very beginning. COLLECTING: AMAZING FANTASY (1962) 15, AMAZING SPIDERMAN (1963) 1-17, ANNUAL (1964) 1 (AMAZING SPIDER-MAN EPIC COLLECTION VOL. 1

30 review for Amazing Spider-Man Epic Collection Vol. 1: Great Power

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Unless you hold the friendly neighborhood wall crawler in the highest possible esteem (check) or have the pointless and absurd ability to nostalgically pine for simpler days that happened before you were born (check), getting through the first 20 issues of The Amazing Spider-Man is a slog. Sure, Ditko’s rendering of Spidey remains iconic and vibrant and Stan’s hyperbolic patter is charming from the get-go, but the mix of page after page of 9-panel layouts, excessive overwriting, and cringe-worth Unless you hold the friendly neighborhood wall crawler in the highest possible esteem (check) or have the pointless and absurd ability to nostalgically pine for simpler days that happened before you were born (check), getting through the first 20 issues of The Amazing Spider-Man is a slog. Sure, Ditko’s rendering of Spidey remains iconic and vibrant and Stan’s hyperbolic patter is charming from the get-go, but the mix of page after page of 9-panel layouts, excessive overwriting, and cringe-worthy slang (not to mention the fact that high school student Peter Parker both looks and acts like a man 20 years his senior) make for some tough sledding. Still… Still. This is where it began, the genesis of a hero who, nearly 60 years after he debuted, still possesses the single greatest origin story in comics—no, not the radioactive spider bite, which is how pretty much every hero got his/her powers at that point in time; I mean the needless death of beloved Uncle Ben, the one that taught Spidey, in the words of the omniscient narrator of Amazing Fantasy #15, that “with great power there must also come great responsibility” (and a huge f#@$ you to Voltaire*, who wishes he would have been so eloquent as to state it so succinctly). It might be a stretch to say that Spider-Man transformed pop culture, creating an indelible imprint that continues to influence writers, artists, thinkers, and business leaders today. Then again, it might not. That’s how powerful a creation this was, folks—I can throw that contention out there as fodder for discussion and you can’t immediately dismiss it. Putting aside its appeal as a historical novelty and its cultural impact, Lee and Ditko sure crushed it right out of the gates when it came to spinning up adversaries for the teenage webhead—Doc Ock, Vulture, Mysterio, Green Goblin, Sandman, Kraven, and Electro all show up over the course of the first dozen issues. It may not quite rival Batman’s, but I’m hard pressed to think of a Marvel hero who has a better rogues’ gallery. I’m biased because Spider-Man is my all-time favorite superhero and it’s not even close; still, if you can steel yourself for the challenge of wading through 1960s hipsterisms and 10,000 words per page, this is well worth the time to acquaint (or reacquaint) yourself with the building blocks of a mythology that has since spanned thousands of epic, and intimate, tales (and resulted in 2018’s best movie, for my money—Into the Spider-Verse). *I’m kidding. I love Voltaire. He just wasn’t as smart as Stan Lee.** **Okay, fine, he was probably smarter than Stan Lee. But he sure had fewer cameos in Marvel movies.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    This is your typical '60s comic: "Monster of the week" plots, ugly coloring, and enough exposition to choke a donkey. These are still worth checking out, though, because they are such cultural artifacts. These stories and characters would go on to inspire some of the greatest stories in comic book and movie history. In these early Spider-Man stories, Lee and company were firing on all cylinders. In almost every issue we are introduced to a new villain that would go on to make up one of the great This is your typical '60s comic: "Monster of the week" plots, ugly coloring, and enough exposition to choke a donkey. These are still worth checking out, though, because they are such cultural artifacts. These stories and characters would go on to inspire some of the greatest stories in comic book and movie history. In these early Spider-Man stories, Lee and company were firing on all cylinders. In almost every issue we are introduced to a new villain that would go on to make up one of the greatest villain bullpens in all of comics. Vulture, Sandman, Green Goblin, Doctor Octopus, Mysterio, Kraven the Hunter, Electro, The Sinister Six, and more all pop up here in these first issues. We also get to see an oft-forgotten Spider-Man romance. Before Gwen Stacy, before Mary Jane Watson, there was the perpetually crying Betty Brant (seriously, she should look into getting on to some anti-depression meds). And, of course, we can't forget J. Jonah Jameson. He was actually my favorite part of this whole book. While most of the writing is pretty cringe-worthy, J.J.J. is still good for a genuine laugh.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Edward Davies

    The stories might not be the best, but all the fun of the original Spider-Man is here for the taking, featuring battles with some of his most iconic villains, including The Burglar, The Chameleon, The Vulture, The Tinkerer, Doctor Octopus, The Sandman, Doctor Doom, The Lizard and Electro, plus cameo appearances from The Fantastic Four! You can't go wrong with this introduction to Marvels greatest solo character. Some of the most important characters in Spider-Man's rogues gallery are seen in thi The stories might not be the best, but all the fun of the original Spider-Man is here for the taking, featuring battles with some of his most iconic villains, including The Burglar, The Chameleon, The Vulture, The Tinkerer, Doctor Octopus, The Sandman, Doctor Doom, The Lizard and Electro, plus cameo appearances from The Fantastic Four! You can't go wrong with this introduction to Marvels greatest solo character. Some of the most important characters in Spider-Man's rogues gallery are seen in this volume for the first time; The Green Goblin, later responsible for the death of Peter Parker's one true love, and Kraven The Hunter who buries Spidey alive and comes so close to killing him. Yet these earlier tales are so innocent and kitschy, not yet showing how terrible these cartoonish villains might become. Plus there's Mysterio and an annual featuring the earliest incarnation of the Sinister Six.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    Artist Steve Ditko is on my list of favorite authors of all time for reasons on display in this volume. There is a joy in the early Spider-Man stories evident in the drawings, expressions, figures, all in the art of Ditko. That buoyant artistic line is a liberating tone tied to the soap opera of the quintessential superhero with problems, and lifts this series beyond the setting, the specific plots, and the early-1960s void from diverse populations. It's a coming-of-age story fueled not so much b Artist Steve Ditko is on my list of favorite authors of all time for reasons on display in this volume. There is a joy in the early Spider-Man stories evident in the drawings, expressions, figures, all in the art of Ditko. That buoyant artistic line is a liberating tone tied to the soap opera of the quintessential superhero with problems, and lifts this series beyond the setting, the specific plots, and the early-1960s void from diverse populations. It's a coming-of-age story fueled not so much by a radioactive spider bite as the fused sensibilities of Lee and Ditko. I have a favorite among these seventeen issues and an Annual, the first team-up of Spider-Man and Daredevil (still in his original yellow acrobat suit) against the Ringmaster and his Circus of Crime, a really silly bunch. In one scene, the Human Cannonball threatens to head-butt Spider-Man, and the Ditko visuals are fine cartooning. Spider-Man's characteristic tics by Ditko are great visuals; his twists on anatomy and expression are super. I can recall my first reading of this story in a paperback edition at my buddy's house. Later, I read appreciatively the early-1980s reprints in Marvel Tales, even though they anachronistically updated the 1960s cultural references. Because I had those for a time, I skipped later reprint editions, the Marvel Masterworks or Essential volumes. This edition, like those earlier books, does away with the anachronisms in text, leaving the stories to charm in crisp line and color. I think there are credits for new attention to the art reproduction and color. There is great back-of-the-book matter, reprinting the art of the first story, from the original pages, with brief notes by Ditko biographer Blake Bell. Read this, in any edition! But this Epic Collection edition is great. Highest recommendation.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eduard Gafton

    (view spoiler)[ Amazing Fantasy #15 Amazing Spider-Man #1 Amazing Spider-Man #2 Amazing Spider-Man #3 Amazing Spider-Man #4 Amazing Spider-Man #5 Amazing Spider-Man #6 (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[ Amazing Fantasy #15 Amazing Spider-Man #1 Amazing Spider-Man #2 Amazing Spider-Man #3 Amazing Spider-Man #4 Amazing Spider-Man #5 Amazing Spider-Man #6 (hide spoiler)]

  6. 4 out of 5

    RG

    Amazing. Better than I was expecting

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sammy Young

    3.5 Stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michel Boto

    Pretending I know nothing about Spider-Man or the cultural impact it's had and judging it solely on its merits.... Meh. The dialogue has Spider-Man and his current foe describing in great detail exactly what they are doing or plan to do next--to one another mid-battle--leading you to wonder if one loses their inner monologue as soon as they're hit with a radiation blast. With great power comes great verbal diarrhea, it seems. It reminded me of the worst kind of anime. I gave it an extra star bec Pretending I know nothing about Spider-Man or the cultural impact it's had and judging it solely on its merits.... Meh. The dialogue has Spider-Man and his current foe describing in great detail exactly what they are doing or plan to do next--to one another mid-battle--leading you to wonder if one loses their inner monologue as soon as they're hit with a radiation blast. With great power comes great verbal diarrhea, it seems. It reminded me of the worst kind of anime. I gave it an extra star because from time to time there are flashes of humor or deep thought, like when Peter wonders to himself just why he doesn't take the easy way out and become a villain (which of course, in those dark days of the Comics Code Authority, obviously could never happen, but nevertheless provided a refreshingly believable moment of doubt and self-reflection). Dialogue: 2/5 The expository text is often superfluous vis-a-vis the obvious depictions of what's happening, though if we pause pretending not to know anything about Spider-Man for a moment, that's a common complaint about Stan Lee's writing. Exposition: 1/5 I'll say upfront, I've never liked Ditko's style. That being said, the pencilling is competent and won't make you feel like he's just recycling panels or phoning it in. There were times when nothing really interesting was happening and there was no reason to expect more than a couple of frames of filler just to establish setting and I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of effort that had obviously gone into holding my interest. I'm not just referring to the technical effort in drawing, but also the angles and dramatic use of foreshortening. Penciling: 4/5 The colors are very vibrant. The paper quality is also excellent. Both were much better than the dull-colored rag paper these comics were surely printed on originally. The kind of stuff that seemed to turn yellow and get brown water stains while you were still holding it in your hands. There are also some interesting extras in the back, like photos of the staff back then, and some of the raw drawings with notes from Stan Lee or the editor. Presentation: 5/5 Despite its many editorial promises of amazement and suspense and that I was about to read the greatest tales ever told, almost all of the stories were interchangeable and bland. The closest I actually came to being in suspense was for about 3 pages somewhere in the middle when it seemed like J Jonah Jameson was The Big Man leading The Enforcers. I knew, of course, that he wasn't, but it was written well enough to make me doubtful. The writing wasn't terrible, mind you, it just wasn't anything special either. It was...exactly what you'd expect in a magazine that cost 12 cents and was marketed to children. You'll see a lot of first appearances of villains here (which is exactly what I wanted to get out of this collection), but you might be disappointed with just how they first appeared. Green Goblin, one of the most important villains Spider-Man has, goes to Hollywood and convinces a studio mogul to film a battle with Spider-Man just to lure him into the desert, where Spider-Man believes they're rehearsing lines--so that he and the now leaderless Enforcers can beat the webs out of him. What? Even in a universe where we suspend disbelief and accept that someone is bitten by a radioactive spider and becomes a superhero, that plot is ridiculous and nonsensical. On the other hand, as with the dialogue there are some hidden depths here as well. The Lizard, at first a mindless monster-of-the-month, turns out to be an amputee war veteran with a loving family. Flash Thompson is both Peter Parker's arch nemesis and the only person who still believes in Spider-Man when Mysterio, disguised as the former, has turned the entire city against him. Story: 3/5 Some of the early issues are full of typos and/or errors from the letterer. In one issue, Spider-Man's alter ego is referred to several times as "Peter Palmer." Perhaps this was an early hint at the Clone Sagas 10 and 30 years later. Lettering/Editing: 3/5 I'm glad these issues existed. They made a lasting impression on print media, film, and television. I don't regret reading them in order to gain a better historical perspective on Spider-Man and the Silver Age in general. But if I'm being honest...I didn't enjoy them. Historical Importance/Context: 5/5 Overall: 3/5 stars

  9. 5 out of 5

    Francisco

    Collecting the first couple of years of Spider-Man comics this remains one of the most important character debuts in the history of comics. Peter Parker is unlike anything before him. Following on from the Fantastic Four which had come out the previous year, Lee again mixes the personal lives of characters into their heroic adventures. However, if the FF were playing at a cosmic scale, Spider-Man was very much a street level hero with all the problems of a teenager: highschool, family, love-life Collecting the first couple of years of Spider-Man comics this remains one of the most important character debuts in the history of comics. Peter Parker is unlike anything before him. Following on from the Fantastic Four which had come out the previous year, Lee again mixes the personal lives of characters into their heroic adventures. However, if the FF were playing at a cosmic scale, Spider-Man was very much a street level hero with all the problems of a teenager: highschool, family, love-life and finances while dealing with a rogue's gallery which gets pretty well defined in these first issues. You get the first appearance of such iconic villains as Doctor Octopus, The Green Goblin, Electro, Mysterio, the Lizard and the Sandman. The whole issue culminates in the first Annual which brings all the villains together in a team-up against Spider-Man. These comics feel, more so than any others of the time (with the possible exception of FF) to be planned in advance for long-running plots. See for example the foreshadowing of the Green Goblin's identity which takes years to be resolved, or Mary Jane Watson, who appears several times in name here but never in person. This is really the birth of what made Marvel so special at this time, a fun, complex set of tales which are also just about punch-ups in New York.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    So I've never read superhero comics before, mostly because they just kind of confuse me with how they are published and how the series works and they reboot the characters all the time and I didn't really know where to start. So I picked up this collection, which is a collection of the very first time Spider-Man ever appeared in print. While it's cool to see the covers of the magazines and how they marketed each issue (and each issue apparently cost only 12 cents), I got bored pretty quickly. It So I've never read superhero comics before, mostly because they just kind of confuse me with how they are published and how the series works and they reboot the characters all the time and I didn't really know where to start. So I picked up this collection, which is a collection of the very first time Spider-Man ever appeared in print. While it's cool to see the covers of the magazines and how they marketed each issue (and each issue apparently cost only 12 cents), I got bored pretty quickly. It's like reading Saturday morning cartoons. I know they are doing some really great and progressive things in superhero comics right now, and that's what I want to read. Now...if I can only figure out where to start...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul Viebranz

    After seven live-action feature films, several animated series, and decades of comics, it's quite interesting to go back to the issues that started it all. Within the first 19 issues in this volume (including his first appearance in Amazing Fantasy), so much that is central to the character today, from the origin to the supporting cast to villains to tropes, is firmly established... and much of it in the first three or four! The spider bite, Ben's murder, Aunt May's worry, Flash's dislike of Pet After seven live-action feature films, several animated series, and decades of comics, it's quite interesting to go back to the issues that started it all. Within the first 19 issues in this volume (including his first appearance in Amazing Fantasy), so much that is central to the character today, from the origin to the supporting cast to villains to tropes, is firmly established... and much of it in the first three or four! The spider bite, Ben's murder, Aunt May's worry, Flash's dislike of Pete and love of Spidey, Liz Allen's interest in Peter as an alternative to Flash's bravado, Jameson's hatred of Spider-Man and Betty Brant's caring for Peter, Pete and Spidey's miserable luck separately and together, the Sinister Six (Doc Ock, Vulture, Sandman, Electro, Kraven, and Mysterio), Chameleon, the Lizard, the Tinkerer, the Green Goblin, the Enforcers, Spider-Man's relationships with Daredevil and the Fantastic Four (especially the Human Torch), Pete taking pictures of Spidey to sell the the Bugle, Pete's emotional turmoil dampening his powers, Spidey running out of web fluid at the exact wrong time... all that and more are explored in these earliest stories. These comics are very different from titles we read today; of course the clothes and language are older, but moreover, they are hilariously overwritten, with nearly every character describing (sometimes in thought balloons but often simply aloud) every single thing they're doing, and Pete's status as a victim of bullying frequently functions to turn him into a vindictive jerk, and not just to Flash. A lot of this takes some getting used to, and while I can write off a lot of it as kitsch, some of it is a little baffling (even though these were aimed squarely at young kids, surely somebody should have realized sooner that the art can tell at least SOME of the story without words describing every minute detail?). All said though, these are a lot of fun. Steve Ditko's art is wonderful, with tons of iconic character designs and some excellent action pieces, and thought there's entirely too much of it, Stan Lee's writing is earnest, and you can't help but love the old Webhead.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matisse

    Yet another thing boomers have over the rest of us: they got the timeless Spidey. Stan Lee wrote the dialogue, Steve Ditko did the art, and the result was a masterpiece of a comics run. I wasn't sure if these older comics were for me. The stories themselves seemed to hold up, but the artwork and dialogue...I was unsure. I'm glad I took the chance. These comics do something lost on modern comics runs: they're written to be individual, episodic-with-recurring-themes stories. Modern comics tell mul Yet another thing boomers have over the rest of us: they got the timeless Spidey. Stan Lee wrote the dialogue, Steve Ditko did the art, and the result was a masterpiece of a comics run. I wasn't sure if these older comics were for me. The stories themselves seemed to hold up, but the artwork and dialogue...I was unsure. I'm glad I took the chance. These comics do something lost on modern comics runs: they're written to be individual, episodic-with-recurring-themes stories. Modern comics tell multi-part stories meant to be bound as graphic novels, so the average kid picking up, say, 'Ghost Spider' is gonna be lost in medias res. One imagines picking up a Spidey issue off the stands back in the 60's and having a good time with the standalone format. The dialogue is so corny and over-the-top that even things like Liz Allan and Betty Brant's woefully pre-feminist portrayal come off as stylistic choices. While it would be revisionist history, one could easily shuffle some nationalities into the all-white cast, and you'd have something truly wonderful. Onto epic collection 2. Because, with Great Power (vol. 1), there must also come Great Responsibility (vol. 2)!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gio Miguelo

    The first volume of Spider-Man's Epic Collection is a wonder to read. It made me feel like a child, a kid, who idolizes these heroes back in the 1960's when these comic books were made. Spider-Man is one of my favorite heroes, and the stories written about him here made me love the friendly neighborhood superhero even more. Every issue was better than the last, as it shows the evolution to the writing and drawings. Story-wise, it was very creative. Not all the villains were great and/or iconic, b The first volume of Spider-Man's Epic Collection is a wonder to read. It made me feel like a child, a kid, who idolizes these heroes back in the 1960's when these comic books were made. Spider-Man is one of my favorite heroes, and the stories written about him here made me love the friendly neighborhood superhero even more. Every issue was better than the last, as it shows the evolution to the writing and drawings. Story-wise, it was very creative. Not all the villains were great and/or iconic, but they were still made with the minds of Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, et al. The stories themselves made me feel immersed and didn't bore me at all. People would probably complain that the stories were predictable, that in the end the good guys always win. That certainly doesn't fully live up in this age, but back then, that's how comic books were written. Everything was perfect, and every person involved in the making of the Spider-Man comics has the world's biggest appreciation. Without them, one of the best ever heroes wouldn't exist.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matt Sautman

    This collection- at first- may seem overly familiar to fans of Spider-Man who have seen the majority- if not every- non-comic adaptation of the character. These earliest issues don’t have much room for Peter Parker (or as Stan Lee wrote accidentally in an early issue- Peter Palmer) to grow and have been retconned over time to make these stories more emotionally powerful (ex: the robber who kills Uncle Ben is not the Sandman originally in these issues). However, once Peter starts growing as a cha This collection- at first- may seem overly familiar to fans of Spider-Man who have seen the majority- if not every- non-comic adaptation of the character. These earliest issues don’t have much room for Peter Parker (or as Stan Lee wrote accidentally in an early issue- Peter Palmer) to grow and have been retconned over time to make these stories more emotionally powerful (ex: the robber who kills Uncle Ben is not the Sandman originally in these issues). However, once Peter starts growing as a character, the issues present here include a human element that make subsequent familiar stories engaging. Any comic historian especially will find this collection fascinating simply based on the sheer number of iconic Spider-Man characters who were introduced early on in the series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    The coming of Spider-Man! Classic tales featuring everyone’s favorite friendly neighborhood wall-crawling web-spinner by the dynamic Steve Ditko. This volume also includes appearances by the Fantastic Four, the Hulk, Daredevil, and an astonishing assortment of baddies that would make any other hero cringe in supplication, and poor down-trodden Spidey nearly does. And the endless bickering bromance between Spider-Man and the Human Torch is the stuff of legends. These stories are a foundational co The coming of Spider-Man! Classic tales featuring everyone’s favorite friendly neighborhood wall-crawling web-spinner by the dynamic Steve Ditko. This volume also includes appearances by the Fantastic Four, the Hulk, Daredevil, and an astonishing assortment of baddies that would make any other hero cringe in supplication, and poor down-trodden Spidey nearly does. And the endless bickering bromance between Spider-Man and the Human Torch is the stuff of legends. These stories are a foundational cornerstone upon which the Marvel Universe was built.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

    To be honest, I’ve never been a huge fan of superhero movies, books, etc. I’m just not into media that focuses mostly on action; I’m all about characters, you know? With that said, I actually found myself really getting invested in Peter Parker’s story. Of course action is a heavy focus in these comics, but there are moments with character in between, which helped keep me from getting too bored. Also, the art style isn’t my favorite, but I’m not going to be too critical about it. It was the 60s, y To be honest, I’ve never been a huge fan of superhero movies, books, etc. I’m just not into media that focuses mostly on action; I’m all about characters, you know? With that said, I actually found myself really getting invested in Peter Parker’s story. Of course action is a heavy focus in these comics, but there are moments with character in between, which helped keep me from getting too bored. Also, the art style isn’t my favorite, but I’m not going to be too critical about it. It was the 60s, you know?

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Amazing Fantasy #15 is the greatest comic ever. In 15 pages they told the greatest hero origin story ever and set up Peter's character perfectly. Even in these early issues it's clear Lee and Ditko had a firm grasp on who Peter was and what his foils are. Were there issues here I didn't care for? Yes. Do I care? No. I love it. Also I think we can all now agree that the OG Spider-Man love triangle wasn't Liz/Peter/Betty or even Peter/Liz/Flash, it was Johnny/Spider-Man/Flash. Cool? Cool. Amazing Fantasy #15 is the greatest comic ever. In 15 pages they told the greatest hero origin story ever and set up Peter's character perfectly. Even in these early issues it's clear Lee and Ditko had a firm grasp on who Peter was and what his foils are. Were there issues here I didn't care for? Yes. Do I care? No. I love it. Also I think we can all now agree that the OG Spider-Man love triangle wasn't Liz/Peter/Betty or even Peter/Liz/Flash, it was Johnny/Spider-Man/Flash. Cool? Cool.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Ravenclaw

    I enjoy a comic origin story and of course I love Peter Parker. However since these stories are so old, they often come across as a bit dated, mostly just in the vernacular and writing style, but that being said, I enjoyed these stories for the most part. These are classics and staples for any Spider-Man superfan!

  19. 4 out of 5

    theComicZone

    The original stories that made spidey what he is today! Recommended for people who’re getting into Spider-Man! Make sure you have patience to read all the words!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Zack! Empire

    What can I say? Some of the greatest comics ever made. If you haven't read this run, stop what you are doing and read them now! What can I say? Some of the greatest comics ever made. If you haven't read this run, stop what you are doing and read them now!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lena Morrison

    It sure was a lot of fun reading these Spidey stories. Spider-Man is my favorite hero because of how human he is and how heroic he is. I personally prefer the first Spider-Man movies to the comics, since I feel their seriousness makes more sense and is more moving.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lser

    VERY COOL. AWESOME START

  23. 5 out of 5

    Craig B

    I loved this collection and seeing the start of spider man I would recommend this to everybody. (especially if your a Peter palmer fan)

  24. 5 out of 5

    queen_elizabeth

    Pure nostalgia. Reading this makes the original casting of Tobey Maguire make sense. I get it now: Spider-Man/Peter Parker is supposed to be kind of lame!

  25. 4 out of 5

    August Dellert

    This is hard to give a proper score. If I would rate it according to its pop-culture significance it would easily be a 5/5. But if I compare it to other more contemporary comics it obviously has many flaws. Therefore my score will be a compromise between the two.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I'm going to go ahead and give this one 5 stars, because it amazes (ha ha) me that Stan Lee and Steve Ditko were able to come up with this many iconic characters in eighteen months. I mean, Spiderman alone was a genius idea and is still making Lee multi-millions in movies and reboots, but when you see the villains they were creating to fight our web-slinging hero, it is clear that they were on fire with ideas! Vulture, Doctor Octopus, Sandman, Lizard, Electro, Mysterio, Green Goblin These are jus I'm going to go ahead and give this one 5 stars, because it amazes (ha ha) me that Stan Lee and Steve Ditko were able to come up with this many iconic characters in eighteen months. I mean, Spiderman alone was a genius idea and is still making Lee multi-millions in movies and reboots, but when you see the villains they were creating to fight our web-slinging hero, it is clear that they were on fire with ideas! Vulture, Doctor Octopus, Sandman, Lizard, Electro, Mysterio, Green Goblin These are just the most famous villains that appeared in the first 14 issues! Many of these villains are still being used in movies and reboots today, more than 50 years later, so it is clear that they have a visceral and original impact on the psyche, and were quite creative ideas. The fact that Spiderman has to use his brain so much in these issues, maybe a bit like Batman, is also appealing to this reader. He's just struggling along, trying to figure things out as he goes. It's nice to have superstrength, etc. but this original Spiderman didn't even have biological webbing - he invented the substance and the method of dispensing it from his costume with his science background! Very cool, and enough to convince me that superheros - this kind at least - can be called science fiction (as opposed to fantasy, but that's another discussion). The one major mark against this collection that I can see is that they ignore the "race question" by having not a single person of color that I can see amidst the pages. So, poo poo on your lack of progressive social vision Mr. Lee/Mr. Ditko. Also, the women aren't portrayed *terribly*, but they certainly represent the standard tropes - love interests or catfighting or damsels to be rescued, although not as much of this latter as I expected. I'm not sure what else was going on in the comic book world in the 60's, but it is clear the Mr. Lee/Marvel were not incorporating the progressive changes going on in the real world into this fantasy world (unless you count women in the secretarial workforce). If you can overlook that, this one is worth looking at for the historical value and for capturing a sense of the pure creative energy that was going on in these pages.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Austin

    Spider-Man is the definitive Marvel character, and these early issues really show why. Spider-Man hit on darker personal themes that no other major comic really did at the time. (The fact that Spider-Man is an unpopular moody teenager is more revolutionary than you may think!) The best part of this comic is definitely the development of the Spider-Man rogues gallery. I don't know why, but his villains are just so cool. My only gripe here is that the comic hasn't found it's voice yet at all--also Spider-Man is the definitive Marvel character, and these early issues really show why. Spider-Man hit on darker personal themes that no other major comic really did at the time. (The fact that Spider-Man is an unpopular moody teenager is more revolutionary than you may think!) The best part of this comic is definitely the development of the Spider-Man rogues gallery. I don't know why, but his villains are just so cool. My only gripe here is that the comic hasn't found it's voice yet at all--also, the weird casual 1960s sexist tropes, etc.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Griffin

    This was an odd read. Most of the issues in this collection introduce the major villains in Spider-Man's life. Then there's the GIANT ROBOT WITH SPINNING ARMS! Mainly, I gave this 3/5 because it was a slow read. I enjoyed it, but the writing style just bugged me. I've had similar problems with other Marvel comics from the '60s. This was an odd read. Most of the issues in this collection introduce the major villains in Spider-Man's life. Then there's the GIANT ROBOT WITH SPINNING ARMS! Mainly, I gave this 3/5 because it was a slow read. I enjoyed it, but the writing style just bugged me. I've had similar problems with other Marvel comics from the '60s.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Wilcox

    Fully inked collection of the first couple of years of Spider-Man including his introduction in Amazing Stories in 1962. Great to see the work as it initially develops his character and the early villains, such as Chameleon, Green Goblin, the Lizard, Sandman, etc. A great collection for people interested in the early works by Marvel

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This is the first Marvel comic book/collection whatever I've ever read. I know, it may be a bit late now especially since Spider-Man came out in 1963. But nonetheless, I enjoyed it! I loved looking at the amazing art and just seeing the “classic” Spider-Man. It was a good experience. This is the first Marvel comic book/collection whatever I've ever read. I know, it may be a bit late now especially since Spider-Man came out in 1963. But nonetheless, I enjoyed it! I loved looking at the amazing art and just seeing the “classic” Spider-Man. It was a good experience.

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