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Follow Your Gut: How the Ecosystem in Your Gut Determines Your Health, Mood, and More

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Allergies, asthma, obesity, stomachaches, acne: these are just a few of the conditions that may be caused—and cured—by the microscopic life inside us. Understand how to use groundbreaking science to improve your health, mood, and more. In just the last few years, scientists have shown how the microscopic ecosystem within our bodies—particularly within our intestines—has an Allergies, asthma, obesity, stomachaches, acne: these are just a few of the conditions that may be caused—and cured—by the microscopic life inside us. Understand how to use groundbreaking science to improve your health, mood, and more. In just the last few years, scientists have shown how the microscopic ecosystem within our bodies—particularly within our intestines—has an astonishing impact on our lives. Pioneering scientist Rob Knight and award-winning science journalist Brendan Buhler explain—with humor and witty metaphors—why these new findings matters to everyone. You are mostly not you. The human gut is host to trillions of microbes, and evidence shows that small changes in these microbes present (altered by antibiotics, diet, geographic region, and so on) may affect weight, likelihood of disease, and even psychological factors like risk-taking behavior. The evidence for their influence is astonishing. Rob Knight is one of the key figures driving forward this new science. His work demonstrates the startling connection between the presence of certain harmless bacteria and the health benefits we all seek for ourselves and our children. In Follow Your Gut, Knight pairs with Brendan Buhler, an award-winning science writer, to explore the previously unseen world inside our bodies. With a practical eye toward deeper knowledge and better decisions, they lead a detailed tour of our microbiome as well as an exploration of the known effects of antibiotics, probiotics, diet choices, birth method, and access to livestock on our children's lifelong health. Ultimately, this pioneering book explains how to learn about your own micro biome and take steps toward understanding and improving your health, using the latest research as a guide.


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Allergies, asthma, obesity, stomachaches, acne: these are just a few of the conditions that may be caused—and cured—by the microscopic life inside us. Understand how to use groundbreaking science to improve your health, mood, and more. In just the last few years, scientists have shown how the microscopic ecosystem within our bodies—particularly within our intestines—has an Allergies, asthma, obesity, stomachaches, acne: these are just a few of the conditions that may be caused—and cured—by the microscopic life inside us. Understand how to use groundbreaking science to improve your health, mood, and more. In just the last few years, scientists have shown how the microscopic ecosystem within our bodies—particularly within our intestines—has an astonishing impact on our lives. Pioneering scientist Rob Knight and award-winning science journalist Brendan Buhler explain—with humor and witty metaphors—why these new findings matters to everyone. You are mostly not you. The human gut is host to trillions of microbes, and evidence shows that small changes in these microbes present (altered by antibiotics, diet, geographic region, and so on) may affect weight, likelihood of disease, and even psychological factors like risk-taking behavior. The evidence for their influence is astonishing. Rob Knight is one of the key figures driving forward this new science. His work demonstrates the startling connection between the presence of certain harmless bacteria and the health benefits we all seek for ourselves and our children. In Follow Your Gut, Knight pairs with Brendan Buhler, an award-winning science writer, to explore the previously unseen world inside our bodies. With a practical eye toward deeper knowledge and better decisions, they lead a detailed tour of our microbiome as well as an exploration of the known effects of antibiotics, probiotics, diet choices, birth method, and access to livestock on our children's lifelong health. Ultimately, this pioneering book explains how to learn about your own micro biome and take steps toward understanding and improving your health, using the latest research as a guide.

30 review for Follow Your Gut: How the Ecosystem in Your Gut Determines Your Health, Mood, and More

  1. 4 out of 5

    Seema Singh

    Fascinating read. I stated my career as a microbiologist so I have a greater interest in the subject but it's really well written and even I have learned things I didn't know. Also, it presents the facts in a very light, fun manner. Fascinating read. I stated my career as a microbiologist so I have a greater interest in the subject but it's really well written and even I have learned things I didn't know. Also, it presents the facts in a very light, fun manner.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kelwalin Dhanasarnsombut

    A very informative bite-size science book that only needs a day to finish, really. Having studied about microorganisms at school but after a journey with this book, you may never feel the sane about them. They cause disease, both infectious and non-infectious, determine your mood, involve in allergies, keep you healthy, control whether you are likely to be fat or slim, and being your fingerprint. Microbiome is your ID; another personal biological data apart from personal genome. Very well written A very informative bite-size science book that only needs a day to finish, really. Having studied about microorganisms at school but after a journey with this book, you may never feel the sane about them. They cause disease, both infectious and non-infectious, determine your mood, involve in allergies, keep you healthy, control whether you are likely to be fat or slim, and being your fingerprint. Microbiome is your ID; another personal biological data apart from personal genome. Very well written; It’s well organised, easy to read, witty, and layperson friendly. It’s one of the myth-buster books I very recommend. //vaccine haters, you not gonna like it; that’s why I like it! หนังสือลดราคาที่คิโนคูนิยะ ไปคว้าซะ! #book #TED #popscience #English [2018/19]

  3. 4 out of 5

    Talenelat

    Nice short book that gives an overview on development in a new sub-field of microbiology that has risen recently and keeps doing so. The implications made by discoveries in the study of our microbiome are huge. We know the importance of DNA in shaping who we are and determining our health, we also know the importance of the brain through neuroscience, but new discoveries indicate a significant part of who we are, what we do, and how we feel is influenced by the bacteria living inside us. This boo Nice short book that gives an overview on development in a new sub-field of microbiology that has risen recently and keeps doing so. The implications made by discoveries in the study of our microbiome are huge. We know the importance of DNA in shaping who we are and determining our health, we also know the importance of the brain through neuroscience, but new discoveries indicate a significant part of who we are, what we do, and how we feel is influenced by the bacteria living inside us. This book is quite easy to get through. I haven't yet watched the TED talk, strangely enough.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Short, easy-to-read (some might say "lightweight", with justification) book about the microbiome: the bacteria that live on your skin, in your mouth, and (most notably) in your gut. They make up about 10% of your body weight, 90% of your cells, and 99% of your (total) DNA. What I like about this book, and what sets it apart from other short, lightweight books about science topics, is that it's really about the science. And by that, I mean the process of science, the process of understanding and k Short, easy-to-read (some might say "lightweight", with justification) book about the microbiome: the bacteria that live on your skin, in your mouth, and (most notably) in your gut. They make up about 10% of your body weight, 90% of your cells, and 99% of your (total) DNA. What I like about this book, and what sets it apart from other short, lightweight books about science topics, is that it's really about the science. And by that, I mean the process of science, the process of understanding and knowing: not a hard body of indisputable fact. It doesn't hesitate to say that research shows this is important, but we still have no idea how or why. We can turn a skinny mouse into a fat mouse (and vice versa) with fecal transplants; but we have only have some vague ideas about what's happening in the gut bacteria, and certainly not enough to start creating weight loss therapies. Eating yogurt with live cultures isn't going to hurt you (people have been doing that for centuries), but a lot of the other "probiotics" that you can buy in almost any store these days--well, we really don't know what they're doing, or what they might do, despite what the labels and advertisements say. Your gut microbiome is important. We're still figuring out how it works. Stay tuned. That's an important message.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Indra

    If you are short on time and want to know more about the human microbiome, this is it. Fascinating read. But this book made me worry how slow and inefficient our current diagnostics are at the moment. If only we had all the technological capabilities.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ha Thu

    Very interesting facts about what human body is compound of. The microbes that we carry everyday might be our new fingerprint that defines us as individual in the planet. It affects our health, our mood, even our behavior. I find it amusing, come to think of it from buddhism teaching, that our human body is indeed a universe just the same as the universe we are living in, we may be the "microbes" in our host planet, behave just like them, affecting the surrounding environments and influenced by Very interesting facts about what human body is compound of. The microbes that we carry everyday might be our new fingerprint that defines us as individual in the planet. It affects our health, our mood, even our behavior. I find it amusing, come to think of it from buddhism teaching, that our human body is indeed a universe just the same as the universe we are living in, we may be the "microbes" in our host planet, behave just like them, affecting the surrounding environments and influenced by them :) Anyway, of what is the most useful information that this book provided, was a clear picture of what happened when we intervene at difference ages in children's life with antibiotics treatment. People often question vaccines, but instead, antibiotics and the widely usage may do us harm in more ways than we could aware of, by affecting our whole microbial ecosystem. Parent, equipped yourselves with information to be intelligent-users!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Jerlinga

    Great little primer! Not quite appropriate for middle school aged kids, (I was hoping to include it in my class library) but a fantastic introduction to the topic for adults-- it only took about an hour to read. Well worth the price.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Payel Kundu

    I picked this book up after seeing Rob Knight speak at a neuroscience conference. To me he struck just the right note of humor, intellectual rigor, and that magical ability great scientists sometimes develop to know the question you are about to ask and answer it for you. This is a really engaging and thoughtful book, it’s also a quick read due to its brevity and explanatory language. I love science books that sit in this rare realm of: a topic I find intrinsically really interesting, but know n I picked this book up after seeing Rob Knight speak at a neuroscience conference. To me he struck just the right note of humor, intellectual rigor, and that magical ability great scientists sometimes develop to know the question you are about to ask and answer it for you. This is a really engaging and thoughtful book, it’s also a quick read due to its brevity and explanatory language. I love science books that sit in this rare realm of: a topic I find intrinsically really interesting, but know nothing about (other great examples include Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker and The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs by Stephen Brusatte). I loved the focus on process. I often found that it anticipated my questions such as: 1. Why didn’t Leeuwenhoek’s discovery of microbes immediately give rise to germ theory (germ theory wouldn’t emerge for another 200 yrs)? (ans: it’s hard to distinguish between different microbes, also people believed that life sprang up from non-living things making the germ theory idea kind of counter-intuitive at the time) 2. How do you measure bacterial diversity? Counting species is problematic if the organisms in question reproduce asexually. (ans: you can do away with species boundaries altogether and measure diversity using a phylogenetic tree) This book really exemplifies the idea that if you can explain an idea to an 8 year old, then you’ve explained it well. This book is great for kids and adults (nice pictures, really easy to follow). It’s actually really rare than a great scientist who is active in the primary research of the field writes in this kind of accessible language. I’m guessing that’s largely down to the partnership with the acclaimed science writer Brendan Buhler. When we see language that is casual, there’s a bias to think it must not be rigorous, which is a real shame, because it removes good science to a place many non-scientists see as inaccessible to them. I think this book is a great model of what conveying science well to the public can look like.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Edith

    Very educational short TED-talk-based short book on the influence of microbes on human health. Readily understandable. What a lot has been going on in the world of microbial research, and how exciting the prospects are! Microbes, as it turns out, influence the human body profoundly--each of us carries about 3 pounds of the things around with us, and we have more microbe genetic data inside us than human. Utterly fascinating, but brief, update on what's going on inside you. Very educational short TED-talk-based short book on the influence of microbes on human health. Readily understandable. What a lot has been going on in the world of microbial research, and how exciting the prospects are! Microbes, as it turns out, influence the human body profoundly--each of us carries about 3 pounds of the things around with us, and we have more microbe genetic data inside us than human. Utterly fascinating, but brief, update on what's going on inside you.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    An excellent quick primer on one of the most exciting areas of discovery in science today: the human microbiome. I can't seem to get enough of this subject - the more I read, the more fascinated I become. The influence of the trillions of microbes living within us on our physical health, mental health, and even possibly our thought processes is nothing short of astonishing. I encourage anyone looking for a solid introduction into the human microbiome to read this book. An excellent quick primer on one of the most exciting areas of discovery in science today: the human microbiome. I can't seem to get enough of this subject - the more I read, the more fascinated I become. The influence of the trillions of microbes living within us on our physical health, mental health, and even possibly our thought processes is nothing short of astonishing. I encourage anyone looking for a solid introduction into the human microbiome to read this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Very interesting, if not entirely new. Short, entertaining and accurate (as much as it can be...)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Robinson

    Some great information and a study I'm involved in is in the book, so that is cool. Some great information and a study I'm involved in is in the book, so that is cool.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Interesting stuff. Now I understand why mosquitoes seem to prefer me :( My microbiome is responsible. A microbe, or “microscopic organism,” is a living thing that is too small to be seen with the naked eye. Only 10% of the cells in our body are human! For every one of our cells, there are 10 microbial cells living on or inside our body. If we measure by DNA, we have 20K human genes but we carry 2M-20M microbial genes! The human DNA is 99.99% identical to the another human, but you might only share Interesting stuff. Now I understand why mosquitoes seem to prefer me :( My microbiome is responsible. A microbe, or “microscopic organism,” is a living thing that is too small to be seen with the naked eye. Only 10% of the cells in our body are human! For every one of our cells, there are 10 microbial cells living on or inside our body. If we measure by DNA, we have 20K human genes but we carry 2M-20M microbial genes! The human DNA is 99.99% identical to the another human, but you might only share 10% of microbe DNA with the same person. Microbiomes are being linked to modern day diseases like auto immune diseases, obesity, autism, depression. Its very much a new area, so no-one really knows how it all fits. Other interesting details from the book - A baby's first microbes come from the mothers birth canal and vagina. During pregnancy the microbial community here prepares for the baby. -Children with diverse microbial communities(pets, siblings, outdoor play) have lower rates of immune system defects -We might carry a disease causing microbe, but it necessarily may not cause us to catch the disease. -Obesity may be connected to our microbiome. Normal sized mice that receive a fecal transplant from an obese mouse become fatter. -Ways to change our microbiome : diet, prebiotics, probiotics, fecal transplants, vaccines -People worry more about vaccines than about the impact of antibiotics. If you don't take antiobiotics at the right dose it can create antibiotic resistant bacteria. Livestock being fed with low dose antibiotics eventually harms us as bugs become resistant. -Antibiotics should be used only when needed. Medicines that target infections need to be created.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mary Ronan Drew

    A report on the most recent developments concerning the microbes in and on your body. There are more of them than you might thing. This is one of a series of short (fewer than 100 pages) TED books. I've found the ones I've read filled with amazing information. The author is taking part in a crowd-sourced medical study of people's microbiome which is different for every person. For a donation of $99 to the Human Biomes Project and a few swabs from here and there on your body you can discover some A report on the most recent developments concerning the microbes in and on your body. There are more of them than you might thing. This is one of a series of short (fewer than 100 pages) TED books. I've found the ones I've read filled with amazing information. The author is taking part in a crowd-sourced medical study of people's microbiome which is different for every person. For a donation of $99 to the Human Biomes Project and a few swabs from here and there on your body you can discover some of the microbes you are carrying around with you. Which may surprise you. Scientists have discovered that the microbes on our left hands are different from those on our right and that we share a good many of them with our pets. The critters in our gut may one day play a significant part in curing asthma, allergies, and obesity. The widespread use of antibiotics in animals may be doing harm to our general health as well as contributing to the rapidly growing resistance of disease to the most commonly used treatments.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

    Audiobook. Excellent. Discusses some very interesting subjects such as how gut biome can determines weight causing overweight for one person and normal weight even when both people have the same diet, how import our gut biome is adversely affected by overly clean and sterile environment, how important the gut biome is to mental and physical health, etc. He also discusses how people have been healed very debilitating digestive diseases from FMT (fecal matter transplants...ew...). Also, the importa Audiobook. Excellent. Discusses some very interesting subjects such as how gut biome can determines weight causing overweight for one person and normal weight even when both people have the same diet, how import our gut biome is adversely affected by overly clean and sterile environment, how important the gut biome is to mental and physical health, etc. He also discusses how people have been healed very debilitating digestive diseases from FMT (fecal matter transplants...ew...). Also, the importance of vaccines and the adverse effects that antibiotics have on our microbes.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Serena

    In compliance with FTC guidelines, I have won this book through the Goodreads Giveaways in April and after several complaints to Simon & Schuster and Goodreads I have finally received the book. That being said, the book is excellent and well written with solid information given in a humorous manner that guarantees it will be retained. My Rating System: * couldn't finish, ** wouldn't recommend, *** would recommend, **** would read again, ***** have read again. In compliance with FTC guidelines, I have won this book through the Goodreads Giveaways in April and after several complaints to Simon & Schuster and Goodreads I have finally received the book. That being said, the book is excellent and well written with solid information given in a humorous manner that guarantees it will be retained. My Rating System: * couldn't finish, ** wouldn't recommend, *** would recommend, **** would read again, ***** have read again.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Glen Templeton

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I liked the book and found it interesting but was a bit disappointed to learned the writer believes over the counter probiotics may do no good. I want to still believe they do. Maybe science will prove someday they do.

  18. 4 out of 5

    James

    Listened to on CD. Very interesting work on how the the microbes in, on and around your body affect your health. In the ensuing years, it will be interesting to see the scientific breakthroughs on how tiny microbes contribute to our health, wellness and disease.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Pretty interesting information and a quick introduction to microbiomes. Fairly easy to understand, I am interested to read more about this subject.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rana

    Fascinating subject, but didn't learn anything new. I really want to do the American gut project! Fascinating subject, but didn't learn anything new. I really want to do the American gut project!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    This was a book full of anecdotal crap (literally) instead of genuine science. Save yourself a good 3-4 hours and skip this one.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maria Paiz

    This is a great little book for people unrelated to the medical field to start learning about the human microbiome: the world of microbes that live on and in our bodies that affects everything from our health to our mood. The book is based on a TED-talk by Rob Knight, who is also the founder of the American Gut Project. I found many facts in this book interesting, especially the idea that certain bacteria may affect conditions such as autism, obesity, depression, IBS, colon cancer, arthritis, di This is a great little book for people unrelated to the medical field to start learning about the human microbiome: the world of microbes that live on and in our bodies that affects everything from our health to our mood. The book is based on a TED-talk by Rob Knight, who is also the founder of the American Gut Project. I found many facts in this book interesting, especially the idea that certain bacteria may affect conditions such as autism, obesity, depression, IBS, colon cancer, arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, and multiple sclerosis, among others. Also interesting is the idea that children should be exposed to many bacteria early on, to be able to fend off diseases later on. Children who are born by C-section could be missing out on necessary bacteria from passing through the birth canal, and babies who are fed formula instead of breast milk may later lack certain bacteria necessary for adequate functioning of the gut. Kids should play in the dirt more often, be exposed to diverse people, and have pets or frequent contact with healthy animals in order to strengthen their immune systems. "Keeping ourselves too clean can lead to immunological problems, as our idle immune systems –unchallenged by the bacteria and viral pathogens that humans co-evolved with– get restless." One important lesson from this book is to favor probiotics and vaccines that expose the body to prevent serious diseases, over antibiotics. Antibiotics destroy many good organisms in our body, with possible serious ramifications to our health. This book is short, interesting, and easy to read. Knight even added cute illustrations to keep us non-scientists engaged. I am now more interested in the subject and plan to participate in the American Gut Project's research.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Martha Meyer

    You've heard a lot about the human microbiome -- it is a hot topic! But, most of the articles assume a certain amount of knowledge. What is all this about microbes and their effect on us? Where's the instruction manual? In 2014, Rob Knight, a professor of pediatrics and computer science and engineering, gave a TED talk about human microbiota . He was uniquely suited to give this TED talk; he is the Director of the Microbiome Initiative at UC Davis and the co-founder of both the American Gut Proje You've heard a lot about the human microbiome -- it is a hot topic! But, most of the articles assume a certain amount of knowledge. What is all this about microbes and their effect on us? Where's the instruction manual? In 2014, Rob Knight, a professor of pediatrics and computer science and engineering, gave a TED talk about human microbiota . He was uniquely suited to give this TED talk; he is the Director of the Microbiome Initiative at UC Davis and the co-founder of both the American Gut Project and the Earth Microbiome Project. The talk, lasting 17.5 minutes, was a hit. Just in case you can't process such new information so fast, Dr. Knight and a brilliant science writer, Brendan Buhler, teamed up to summarize those 17 minutes in a nice, small book. It is the smallest book about this subject that I have found and does a nice job of summarizing where we were in 2015.  IF you feel like you want to get a better fundamental understanding  of this topic, this book is for you. The goal? You can be a bit friendlier to, a somewhat better steward of, the 3 lbs or so of microbes that determine how your body and mind functions and how long you live.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ardhi Listyar

    Recommended for laypeople out there who're interested in taking a better look at microbes within and on our body. So, the reason why this gets 4 stars from me is that there is no explicit correlation between one of the drawings on the cover and the content of the book. Based on the cover I assume that there was going to be a study or an explanation of how our microbiota affects our sleep quality or something like that. But there wasn't. Perhaps the sleep illustration on the cover is just a way o Recommended for laypeople out there who're interested in taking a better look at microbes within and on our body. So, the reason why this gets 4 stars from me is that there is no explicit correlation between one of the drawings on the cover and the content of the book. Based on the cover I assume that there was going to be a study or an explanation of how our microbiota affects our sleep quality or something like that. But there wasn't. Perhaps the sleep illustration on the cover is just a way of describing that there are microbes on our skin that regulate the smell that could attract or repel mosquitos which in turn affect sleep quality? Or perhaps, our sleep might be affected by anxiety or depression which might also be regulated by our microbes? Well, I'm not sure of the purpose of that sleep illustration. Why put something on the cover that's not gonna live up to the explanation? It bothers me. Other than that, the findings in this book are just great!

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Wood

    Based on a TED talk, this book gives a concise overview of the recent research on the microbiota in our body especially those in our gut. Many research studies of the effects of probiotics and prebiotics are cited. The book states that much more research is needed and offers no real strategies for using this knowledge. The American Gut Project, a study of the microbes of the gut, using samples submitted by interested individuals, was started by the author, Rob Knight. For a fee, anyone can submi Based on a TED talk, this book gives a concise overview of the recent research on the microbiota in our body especially those in our gut. Many research studies of the effects of probiotics and prebiotics are cited. The book states that much more research is needed and offers no real strategies for using this knowledge. The American Gut Project, a study of the microbes of the gut, using samples submitted by interested individuals, was started by the author, Rob Knight. For a fee, anyone can submit a sample and get info into the type and quantity of bacteria in their colon, which is added to the study's database.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Henry

    - While human share many genetic similarities, we do not share many microbes (90% are different): microbes are what define who we are - Children born with cesarean section have more likelihood of developing immune system disease such as asmatha and allergies (shit) - microbes have connection with weight. Fat mouse's gut bacteria transferred to slim mouse, the result was the slim mouse also got fat - Gut bacteria also has major influence on our mood. Depression episodes often have link towards gut - While human share many genetic similarities, we do not share many microbes (90% are different): microbes are what define who we are - Children born with cesarean section have more likelihood of developing immune system disease such as asmatha and allergies (shit) - microbes have connection with weight. Fat mouse's gut bacteria transferred to slim mouse, the result was the slim mouse also got fat - Gut bacteria also has major influence on our mood. Depression episodes often have link towards gut inflammation

  27. 5 out of 5

    Colton Pendley

    A very short, but informing read. A great book about how our bodies are entire ecosystems for a diverse group of microbes and how they affect our health, and other aspects of our life. My favorite chapter discusses antibiotics, and how people are more worried about vaccines than they are the misuse of antibiotics which proves to be much more problem-some. Would recommend to anyone interested in science.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Francesca

    Read it now and follow the inspiration! A funny, extended TED talk style book that's appropriate for YA and above. Author is very good at /writing in the skepticism/ and showing that science has humility--to admit what it does know, doesn't know and will probably change given the data. I admire the openeness he has about events in his life and paints them very well without being...gross as they could be. Well worth the read, as exciting as CRISPR yet is underrated. Read it now and follow the inspiration! A funny, extended TED talk style book that's appropriate for YA and above. Author is very good at /writing in the skepticism/ and showing that science has humility--to admit what it does know, doesn't know and will probably change given the data. I admire the openeness he has about events in his life and paints them very well without being...gross as they could be. Well worth the read, as exciting as CRISPR yet is underrated.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Ervin

    I found the book to be surprisingly interesting. I enjoyed his work on the microbiology and the impact it makes on your body. The microbiology could impact your weight, mood, and your resistance to bacteria infections . The topic sounds like it is relatively new and it would be fascinating to hear about the end results in a couple of years.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    This is a good introduction into the world of cells. My daughter and I participated in a study and this book was sent to us. I find the study and mapping of microbes to be fascinating since the discovery is fairly new.

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