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From deep in the heart of imagination, where galaxies grow, robots rule, and Martians cause mayhem, comes WORLDS OF TOMORROW: THE AMAZING UNIVERSE OF SCIENCE FICTION ART. Teeming with gigantic insects, spaceships, and scantily clad heroines, the science fiction pulp and paperback covers of the 1920s to 1960s represented a generation�s vision of the future. Wartime technolo From deep in the heart of imagination, where galaxies grow, robots rule, and Martians cause mayhem, comes WORLDS OF TOMORROW: THE AMAZING UNIVERSE OF SCIENCE FICTION ART. Teeming with gigantic insects, spaceships, and scantily clad heroines, the science fiction pulp and paperback covers of the 1920s to 1960s represented a generation�s vision of the future. Wartime technology and increased information about space travel fueled the minds of artists and writers. Predictions of planetary doom stood side by side with visions of Utopia on bookshelves and magazine racks worldwide. In WORLDS OF TOMORROW, more than 300 beautifully displayed science fiction covers come back to life in text and chapters grouped by theme. Explore the creative geniuses that molded our vision of the great unknown into what it is today.


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From deep in the heart of imagination, where galaxies grow, robots rule, and Martians cause mayhem, comes WORLDS OF TOMORROW: THE AMAZING UNIVERSE OF SCIENCE FICTION ART. Teeming with gigantic insects, spaceships, and scantily clad heroines, the science fiction pulp and paperback covers of the 1920s to 1960s represented a generation�s vision of the future. Wartime technolo From deep in the heart of imagination, where galaxies grow, robots rule, and Martians cause mayhem, comes WORLDS OF TOMORROW: THE AMAZING UNIVERSE OF SCIENCE FICTION ART. Teeming with gigantic insects, spaceships, and scantily clad heroines, the science fiction pulp and paperback covers of the 1920s to 1960s represented a generation�s vision of the future. Wartime technology and increased information about space travel fueled the minds of artists and writers. Predictions of planetary doom stood side by side with visions of Utopia on bookshelves and magazine racks worldwide. In WORLDS OF TOMORROW, more than 300 beautifully displayed science fiction covers come back to life in text and chapters grouped by theme. Explore the creative geniuses that molded our vision of the great unknown into what it is today.

30 review for Worlds of Tomorrow: The Amazing Universe of Science Fiction Art

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    If all you want is a collection of science fiction book and magazine covers from the 30's to the 50's, you can add another star - most of the art has attributions (though only half include the artist responsible, instead illlogically favoring the writers over the artists), and you can make a game out of looking for the full version of the blown up pages, since there is no attribution for those by the full pages, only the originals. The art is sorted into four categories (generic, vehicles, robot If all you want is a collection of science fiction book and magazine covers from the 30's to the 50's, you can add another star - most of the art has attributions (though only half include the artist responsible, instead illlogically favoring the writers over the artists), and you can make a game out of looking for the full version of the blown up pages, since there is no attribution for those by the full pages, only the originals. The art is sorted into four categories (generic, vehicles, robots, and aliens), although there's no clear organization beyond that. Not by magazine, or time period, or artist, or even type of vehicle/robot/alien. And if you're planning on reading the content, whoo boy are you going to be unimpressed. The text is borderline nonsensical, often repetitive, embarrassingly sophomoric, and occasionally utterly unrelated to the book (it spends paragraphs talking about science fiction movies despite the fact that no movie posters are included). Its views on women in Science Fiction art are horrifying. And editorially, this book is laid out unbelievably poorly. On the occasions when the text refers to specific covers, those covers are NEVER on the spread. They may be 18 pages earlier or 10 pages later. There's no way to tell. I would have either a) included the relevant art on the page discussing it (since there's no other organizational principle) or b) at the minimum included the page number where the art is found. To do neither is so lazy that it smacks of indifference or outright hostility to the reader. Why should I value your opinion on a piece of art if you can't even provide the art as an argument for your point? This doesn't even serve as a reference piece, because again there is minimal organization in the artwork - magazine covers from the 20's are next to book covers from the 50's with no rhyme or reason. You can't tell if the artist is the same since most of the pieces don't even name the creator. The fantastical science fiction art of the 30's-50's era magazines and science fiction books is very unique and is worthy of display. But it deserves a much more dedicated effort than this slapdash selection.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Kahn

    The book covers are good, the text is terrible. They would be have been better to have had the book go out with no text rather than the useless, uninformed drivel that's been provided. It reads as if it was written in fifteen minutes by a student trying their first essay. It basically just enumerates the kind of pictures on the covers. The text will reference a book cover that's nowhere to be seen. You have to spend several minutes flipping through pages to find the cover of the book referenced, The book covers are good, the text is terrible. They would be have been better to have had the book go out with no text rather than the useless, uninformed drivel that's been provided. It reads as if it was written in fifteen minutes by a student trying their first essay. It basically just enumerates the kind of pictures on the covers. The text will reference a book cover that's nowhere to be seen. You have to spend several minutes flipping through pages to find the cover of the book referenced, and there is no credit given to any of the artists. It's an interesting decision on a book about science fiction art not to include artist information, or to do any kind of research to provide insight into the art of science fiction. Three stars for the cover images ; 0 stars for the text. Ackerman and Brad Linaweaver are a couple of hacks who have no business having their worked published anywhere.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Williwaw

    This is a beautiful book. It's got a high-quality binding and paper, and the full-color reproductions of sf book covers and pulp magazine covers look stunning. It was clearly a labor of love, and one can get a great deal of enjoyment just flipping through the pages and perusing the images. Unfortunately, it lacks organization! In general, the images are grouped by the themes discussed in each chapter, such as space vehicles, aliens, and architecture. Other than that, the images seem to be in a fa This is a beautiful book. It's got a high-quality binding and paper, and the full-color reproductions of sf book covers and pulp magazine covers look stunning. It was clearly a labor of love, and one can get a great deal of enjoyment just flipping through the pages and perusing the images. Unfortunately, it lacks organization! In general, the images are grouped by the themes discussed in each chapter, such as space vehicles, aliens, and architecture. Other than that, the images seem to be in a fairly random order. You won't get any sense of the development of sf, whether it be from the perspective of a given magazine series or a particular author's or artist's oeuvre. Furthermore, the text often discusses art that appears several pages ahead of or behind the narrative! The narrative itself fails to hold my attention and does not seem to add much to the images. It's a great coffee-table book, but don't expect much beyond that.

  4. 4 out of 5

    TrumanCoyote

    There are a number of problems with this one. Yes, there are a lot of very nice Golden Age magazine covers, but unfortunately (and this is the main fault here) the book is padded out with tons of schlocky paint-by-numbers stuff from England and Australia (it would've also been nice by the way to have the cover artists credited in the captions). Then too there's Brad's commentary, which often sounds like the disjointed ramblings from some fanzine--said rambling effect only being accentuated by th There are a number of problems with this one. Yes, there are a lot of very nice Golden Age magazine covers, but unfortunately (and this is the main fault here) the book is padded out with tons of schlocky paint-by-numbers stuff from England and Australia (it would've also been nice by the way to have the cover artists credited in the captions). Then too there's Brad's commentary, which often sounds like the disjointed ramblings from some fanzine--said rambling effect only being accentuated by the fact that Brad's text is not keyed to any specific pages. Oh yeah, and speaking of facts...a facts-checker/proofreader would've been a nice addition to the staff. (Orson's Mars scare in 1939? Jules Verne wrote In the Days of the Comet? Bob Dylan sang "Where Have All the Flowers Gone"?)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lew

    The best part of this book is the excellent reproduction of the many science fiction cover illustrations from classic books, pulps and magazines. Unfortunately, the narrative from Forrest Ackerman and Brad Linaweaver wasn't worth reading. The text rambled and referenced covers not on the same page or opposite page. The biggest disappointment was that this book was focused on the beautiful cover art and never gave credit to various artist and illustrators except some comments in the text. Still t The best part of this book is the excellent reproduction of the many science fiction cover illustrations from classic books, pulps and magazines. Unfortunately, the narrative from Forrest Ackerman and Brad Linaweaver wasn't worth reading. The text rambled and referenced covers not on the same page or opposite page. The biggest disappointment was that this book was focused on the beautiful cover art and never gave credit to various artist and illustrators except some comments in the text. Still the book is worth having due to the excellent selection of covers and their reproduction. There are a lot of British book covers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett Pulsipher

    I would definitely recommend this to any lover of the scifi aesthetic. It's a beautiful book. I would definitely recommend this to any lover of the scifi aesthetic. It's a beautiful book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jack Ross

  8. 4 out of 5

    David H

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gilbert

  10. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  13. 5 out of 5

    John S.

  14. 5 out of 5

    James Beach

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brad Thompson

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Prosch

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robert James

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rex

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jim Cleaveland

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  22. 5 out of 5

    susie hawes

  23. 4 out of 5

    T. S.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Allan Maurer

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matej Vakula

  26. 5 out of 5

    Avery

  27. 4 out of 5

    Greg Carter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Francisco Muñiz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Donna

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Ervin

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