web site hit counter No Solid Ground: Renewable Contentment and Sustainable Happiness in an Age of Uncertainty - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

No Solid Ground: Renewable Contentment and Sustainable Happiness in an Age of Uncertainty

Availability: Ready to download

In No Solid Ground, Jeffrey Joe Miller manages to shake the foundations of our world, while at the same time ushering us into a new vision of contentment and grace. He observes that our modern view of existence is founded on a cherished notion that our earth is stable, and describes how clinging to a fantasy of "solid, separate, and certain" in the midst of the chaotic cha In No Solid Ground, Jeffrey Joe Miller manages to shake the foundations of our world, while at the same time ushering us into a new vision of contentment and grace. He observes that our modern view of existence is founded on a cherished notion that our earth is stable, and describes how clinging to a fantasy of "solid, separate, and certain" in the midst of the chaotic change we are now experiencing during a rapidly unfolding phenomenon known as the Sixth Extinction Event, creates a perceptual disconnect that results in profound unease in the human mind. A trained psychotherapist with specialization in Ecopsychology and Somatic Psychology, he guides us through a series of five steps and related exercises (organized as a journey through Earth's seasons) that realign our minds and bodies, and by extension, our society, so we're in sync with the uncertain and fast changing circumstances that accompany finding ourselves living in a twirling planet that's embedded in a dynamic solar system. This journey is a time-honored spirited path to recognizing our birthright of renewable contentment and sustainable happiness, even in the midst of continuous and unavoidable uncertainty. No Solid Ground is a profound and profoundly moving work that skillfully melds hard science and ancient wisdom, resulting in a direct and practical path to organic sanity. It is a deeply important book for our modern age, and one that could change your life." 410 pages. 44 illustrations. Extensive References section. Over 30 personal exercises.


Compare

In No Solid Ground, Jeffrey Joe Miller manages to shake the foundations of our world, while at the same time ushering us into a new vision of contentment and grace. He observes that our modern view of existence is founded on a cherished notion that our earth is stable, and describes how clinging to a fantasy of "solid, separate, and certain" in the midst of the chaotic cha In No Solid Ground, Jeffrey Joe Miller manages to shake the foundations of our world, while at the same time ushering us into a new vision of contentment and grace. He observes that our modern view of existence is founded on a cherished notion that our earth is stable, and describes how clinging to a fantasy of "solid, separate, and certain" in the midst of the chaotic change we are now experiencing during a rapidly unfolding phenomenon known as the Sixth Extinction Event, creates a perceptual disconnect that results in profound unease in the human mind. A trained psychotherapist with specialization in Ecopsychology and Somatic Psychology, he guides us through a series of five steps and related exercises (organized as a journey through Earth's seasons) that realign our minds and bodies, and by extension, our society, so we're in sync with the uncertain and fast changing circumstances that accompany finding ourselves living in a twirling planet that's embedded in a dynamic solar system. This journey is a time-honored spirited path to recognizing our birthright of renewable contentment and sustainable happiness, even in the midst of continuous and unavoidable uncertainty. No Solid Ground is a profound and profoundly moving work that skillfully melds hard science and ancient wisdom, resulting in a direct and practical path to organic sanity. It is a deeply important book for our modern age, and one that could change your life." 410 pages. 44 illustrations. Extensive References section. Over 30 personal exercises.

52 review for No Solid Ground: Renewable Contentment and Sustainable Happiness in an Age of Uncertainty

  1. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    Comets hurtling to Earth, asteroids, meteorites, devastating earthquakes and tsunamis, massive volcanoes, critical climate changes. Merely the subjects of blockbuster movies? If only. This book may at first read like sci-fi or conjecture. But the evidence is there - these devastating events and more are not only possible but likely - and they've happened in cycles in the past, hundreds if not thousands of years ago. We may all think it isn't true, because we're caught up in a modern society that Comets hurtling to Earth, asteroids, meteorites, devastating earthquakes and tsunamis, massive volcanoes, critical climate changes. Merely the subjects of blockbuster movies? If only. This book may at first read like sci-fi or conjecture. But the evidence is there - these devastating events and more are not only possible but likely - and they've happened in cycles in the past, hundreds if not thousands of years ago. We may all think it isn't true, because we're caught up in a modern society that craves MORE - more gadgets, more technology, bigger and better cars. But the author points out that more is never enough, and none of our iPhones or instant web access will protect us from what lies ahead. He explains how we may be tech-savvy, but our ancient ancestors were actually more aware of the planet we live in (the reader will learn why this is the correct phrase). Ancient people were experts in astronomy, chemistry, architecture, astrology, meteorology, oceanology - all the fields that made them alert to the roles each topic played not only in the environment but in their minds and bodies, too. The title No Solid Ground refers in part to the fact that while we think the Earth is stable and orderly, it's in constant movement, just one wrong spin away from chaos. He calls this period the Sixth Extinction, because others have come before, destroying cities and people, killing off 97% of ocean life. It would be easier not to read this book, on two levels. First, though the author makes every attempt to remain clear-cut in his writing, the very subject matter becomes very scientific and scholarly at times. But it's a credit to him for the massive research he's done. Second, it would be easy to turn your back on the facts and brush them off as impossible. But as the book progresses, it becomes all too real and compelling. He offers 5 Steps to help the reader get back in touch with the reality that we are not separate from the Earth, but part of it. "How can we be separate from air and water," he asks, "when our body depends on them to live?" He provides relaxation and visualization exercises applying to each Step - all in an effort to make us wake up and unite with Earth before it's too late. He says that if we don't live through all of the upcoming events, our children or grandchildren surely will. There may be other books to address this topic to some degree, but I doubt any of them not only spell out the risk of disasters, but provide ways to survive and thrive. If nothing else, it will give an appreciation for all the natural things we have and how we need to protect them. Instead of considering those who adamantly protect the environment as slightly "weird", we should read this book and realize their way needs to become the norm.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kati

    I received this book as a First Reads win here on Goodreads in exchange for my unbiased opinion. Now for the unbiased part: I found the author's summation that our distant ancestors didn't war & fight to be naive. I found his premise rather optimistic. The naivety is why I give this only 4 stars instead of the 5 that I think it would have deserved otherwise. I find it very difficult to believe that only in the last 8 to 10 thousand years have we started fighting amongst ourselves, as the wheel of I received this book as a First Reads win here on Goodreads in exchange for my unbiased opinion. Now for the unbiased part: I found the author's summation that our distant ancestors didn't war & fight to be naive. I found his premise rather optimistic. The naivety is why I give this only 4 stars instead of the 5 that I think it would have deserved otherwise. I find it very difficult to believe that only in the last 8 to 10 thousand years have we started fighting amongst ourselves, as the wheel of time wound down to these "final days" as he so often refers to them. I enjoyed this book rather thoroughly. The diagrams throughout the first half were immensely helpful in understanding what was being referred to in his discussion of historical artifacts and architecture. The exercises throughout the second half are intreguing. I haven't started doing the exercises myself, EXCEPT the initial breathing exercise and the daily reminders that mind, body, civilization, earth, solar system, galaxy, and multi-verse are all in a constant state of flux, that there is no solid ground to be found anywhere..... (He words it so fluidly, I'm just summarizing the two exercises I HAVE started with.) I wanted first to finish the book in a timely manner so I could review it here. I plan on attacking the exercises over the next several months or year, hopefully working them into my day, and seeing how they play out in my life. (Future addendum to my review? Perhaps!) One or two points regarding the exercises DID make me roll my eyes.... Primarily where he advocates concentration and contemplation for more than an hour per day. I can feasibly understand a half hour, perhaps even an hour, but for hours.... I DO have meals to make and a job to perform. And sleep. I need sleep. And my pups need playtime. That's not to say that I don't agree with Mr. Miller that much of our lives are wasted on the constant drive for "more, more, more", particularly materialistically, but there are still necessities that MUST be met: caring for family, body, and performing the job that pays me to put food on the table and a roof over my head. (And that doesn't even get into my hobbies, like writing, crochet, baking or gardening.) Would I recommend this book? A resounding YES! YES! DO READ! I'm requesting that my library buy a copy, and I'm seriously considering buying several copies (probably not all at once, I'm not rich!) to give to friends whom I think would be receptive to the concepts & theories espoused here.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jase Woods

    How often do you read a book that really makes you think? I mean really really THINK outside the limits of what you've been taught? What I mean by "think" is that it challenges your view of the world and your own life. No Solid Ground does this, and does it believably. Every few pages of this book talks about facts (and I googled to verify) that challenged how I understood what the author refers to as "this place we find ourselves embedded in". The basic idea of No Solid Ground is that how we've How often do you read a book that really makes you think? I mean really really THINK outside the limits of what you've been taught? What I mean by "think" is that it challenges your view of the world and your own life. No Solid Ground does this, and does it believably. Every few pages of this book talks about facts (and I googled to verify) that challenged how I understood what the author refers to as "this place we find ourselves embedded in". The basic idea of No Solid Ground is that how we've been trained to think about earth is (and he explains how we came to think about earth the way we do) is wrong, and that this wrong understanding of how earth works has causes us to build our society so that it can't survive earth's natural seasonal cycles that are caused by the sun's seasonal activity. He relates this misunderstanding and the cycles of solar activity to both ancient mythology and scientifically verified pattens of global extinction events, climate change, and asteroid impacts, and to the Holacene extinction that is currently taking place. He explains that this basic misunderstanding is the cause of a "very modern madness" that threatens the human species survival. He relates this misunderstanding to how we've been trained to think (and not think). And he explains that this brainwashed way of thinking prevents us from being healthy and happy. A couple of the chapters could be better edited...but this is easily overlooked when the primary message of the book, which Mr. Miller describes in clear detail as being very ancient, is understood. I highly recommend this book. Even if you're not comfortable with the critical analysis of religion (in one chapter) and it's role in preventing a realistic view of earth and the purpose of life. I also want to say that a lot of what the author wrote is very touching and even caused me to tear up at one point. This book is like no other I've ever read...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Javert Permerci

    So many surprises in this book. Who knew 150k species are going extinct every year! There were other things in this book that took me by surprise too like solar storms can cause heart attacks, yikes. Bumble bees and flowers communicate with each other. A drought all over the planet nearly wiped out humans 70k years ago. Part 1 is a fascinating mix of science research with mythology centering around the precession of the equinoxes.The basic idea is we have forgotten earth has a long history of gl So many surprises in this book. Who knew 150k species are going extinct every year! There were other things in this book that took me by surprise too like solar storms can cause heart attacks, yikes. Bumble bees and flowers communicate with each other. A drought all over the planet nearly wiped out humans 70k years ago. Part 1 is a fascinating mix of science research with mythology centering around the precession of the equinoxes.The basic idea is we have forgotten earth has a long history of global natural disasters and forgotten they come in cycles. These civilization threatening disasters have fallen off our radar because our attention has been diverted away from them, maybe not by accident. There's tons of evidence in this book about how ancient cultures knew about the repeating disasters and hide clues about them in their myths, but we are missing this information in our consumer society. Then in Part 2 he asks "now that we have this information, how do we live?" As a longtime student of myths and Eastern philosophy, it was evident to me that the author has a real understanding of an ancient way of thinking that answers this important question. His interpretation of this ,described in five steps in a science context is very different from how it is usually taught in school. Rejecting a religious of interpretation of myths, he instead describes them as a common sense ecology of body, mind, earth, and sky. Part 2 is a journey of "familiarization and integration" that he assures us will help us to return to sanity and be happy. The writing and voice quickly drew me into the story...he says it like he means it. Sort of a mash up of George Carlin and Dalai Lama. :) The illustrations are great. All in all a valuable addition to my collection of favorite books and authors.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Taylor

    This is a interesting and important book that covers a lot of ground. The research is formidable. There are two parts, the first part is about nature, science, and mythology. A lot of the information in the first part is contrary to how most of us think about nature if we think of it at all. He doesn’t sugar coat the dilemma that we’re in now during what he calls an age of uncertainty. Humans are now so far removed from nature that we don’t understand the seriousness of what’s going on as 150,00 This is a interesting and important book that covers a lot of ground. The research is formidable. There are two parts, the first part is about nature, science, and mythology. A lot of the information in the first part is contrary to how most of us think about nature if we think of it at all. He doesn’t sugar coat the dilemma that we’re in now during what he calls an age of uncertainty. Humans are now so far removed from nature that we don’t understand the seriousness of what’s going on as 150,000 creatures go extinct every year. He calls this an everyday madness. In the second part of the book he explains in detail how this madness came to be and eloquently walks us through a way of recovering sanity. According to him, this sanity will result in “renewable contentment and sustainable happiness” and this will help humans survive the big changes that we or those that come after us can expect to see happen. I appreciated the author’s clean sensible writing style. A lot of the first part of the book is about things none of us want to think about but he doesn’t sensationalize it. He describes some difficult concepts so they are easy to understand though some of it may require rereading and thinking. There’s a glossary in the back of the book and an extensive references section. There are some things stated in this book that I don’t agree with but in a book of this scope that’s bound to happen. I’m giving the book a 4 star rating because there’s one chapter that could be put together better as others have said. If he organizes it better he’s got a fiver. The world would be a better place if everyone would read it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elijah

    Due to my penchant for advocating sustainability and a life of synonymy with our surroundings, I’m always looking for works that can illuminate me on the subject and amplify my awareness. After purchasing and consuming this material, I can wholly attest that it is an erudite and fascinating study on the subject of earth related instability and a means of creating equilibrium despite the impending issues. His vivid and scholastic writing style displays his obvious authority on the subject and the Due to my penchant for advocating sustainability and a life of synonymy with our surroundings, I’m always looking for works that can illuminate me on the subject and amplify my awareness. After purchasing and consuming this material, I can wholly attest that it is an erudite and fascinating study on the subject of earth related instability and a means of creating equilibrium despite the impending issues. His vivid and scholastic writing style displays his obvious authority on the subject and the discussion on the convergence taking place on earth that will create a society shifting change throughout the world is mesmerizing. From the discussions of contemporary hot buttons such as climate all the way to biological human rhythms and exercises that help wake us up to what is going on in the periphery and directly in front of us, the author commits to an unabashed cymbal clash of honesty that is meant to wake up as many of us as possible. This lack of discretion and transparency makes for intriguing reading every step of the way. Also, the source code information that permeates our digital, media enhanced society was worth the price of admission alone; a stellar piece of writing that deserves wider distribution. In summary, this is one of the most densely written calls to arms that I have read in recent memory. If anyone else is looking for clarity on our current situation or are looking for an intriguing book that has the power to change your paradigm, you shouldn’t miss this one. I’ve no doubt it’s going to remain a staple in my library for a long time to come.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Danny

    An interesting mix of science, psychology and self help. No Solid Ground begins with a look at the dynamic and unpredictable nature of our universe, or as I like to refer to it with my Earth and Space Science students: "All the ways the universe is trying to kill us and there is nothing we can do about it." (Invariably someone suggests that if the Yellowstone caldera erupts, they should not bother studying for exams.) We then move into early measurement and engineering techniques in the ancient An interesting mix of science, psychology and self help. No Solid Ground begins with a look at the dynamic and unpredictable nature of our universe, or as I like to refer to it with my Earth and Space Science students: "All the ways the universe is trying to kill us and there is nothing we can do about it." (Invariably someone suggests that if the Yellowstone caldera erupts, they should not bother studying for exams.) We then move into early measurement and engineering techniques in the ancient world, often much more precise and elegant than we give ancient societies credit for. Next is an examination of legends of the fall of golden age civilizations and cataclysm myths from around the world and the ritual and symbolic traditions that various cultures have developed to address uncertainty and change on a societal level. Miller's presentation can be "New Agey" in its reference to astrological ages and cycles of upheaval and disaster but it isn't such a bad thing to be adaptable in a random and changing world. And this is the subject of part two: using our cultural traditions and folk memory with meditation and awareness techniques to become more resilient to change and uncertainty. The goal is a good one, although the doomsday motivation is somewhat exaggerated.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Urban

    No Solid Ground is one fascinating read that will give readers a new look at how our ancient ancestors thought about the earth and sky and how natural processes deeply affect us on a regular basis. From our ancestor's texts, symbols, and architectural structures to studying potential disasters such as climate extremes, falling meteors, and periodic madness, the author makes us realize that it is our own ignorance and forgetfulness of that past that makes real contentment and happiness rare in ou No Solid Ground is one fascinating read that will give readers a new look at how our ancient ancestors thought about the earth and sky and how natural processes deeply affect us on a regular basis. From our ancestor's texts, symbols, and architectural structures to studying potential disasters such as climate extremes, falling meteors, and periodic madness, the author makes us realize that it is our own ignorance and forgetfulness of that past that makes real contentment and happiness rare in our lives. Jeffrey Joe Miller has masterfully woven together a masterpiece of a nonfiction book. There were so many things I learned as I moved through this incredible journey he takes the reader on. I would definitely recommend this book to readers world-wide. The author gives ample research to back up everything he talks about in Part 1 of the book (much of it quite surprising to read) and the exercises at the end of each chapter in Part II are very valuable and clear to understand. A very interesting and psychological perspective on everything we know placed into a whole new light. I rate this book five star!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Liz Vinc

    "No Solid Ground," by Jeffrey Joe Miller, is a powerful read that provokes thoughts about the value of ancient wisdom and the danger of not thinking about the future. Part ancient mystery, part personal development, Miller references the Sixth Extinction Event, a rapid change that poses serious threats to humanity while also sharing how to realign the mind and body. Miller outlines a number of transformative exercises to help with the process of getting ourselves in sync with the universe. The au "No Solid Ground," by Jeffrey Joe Miller, is a powerful read that provokes thoughts about the value of ancient wisdom and the danger of not thinking about the future. Part ancient mystery, part personal development, Miller references the Sixth Extinction Event, a rapid change that poses serious threats to humanity while also sharing how to realign the mind and body. Miller outlines a number of transformative exercises to help with the process of getting ourselves in sync with the universe. The author's training in psychotherapy is evident in the professional, scientific approach he takes with the topic. He uses concise yet thorough writing to show the power of the interconnectedness of the self, society, and the universe. What I really like about this book is that it's a "big picture" approach to self-improvement. Only by thinking outside oneself can we truly improve ourselves. If you're looking to find contentment and happiness with a spiritual approach based on ancient knowledge, then I'd highly recommend this thought-provoking book to you!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Naylor

    I am currently going through some big changes in life as I am stopping full-time work and going back to get my degree over the next few years. A friend of mine recommended this book and I am really glad that they did as it really does inspire contentment and a sense of peace with the way life is. I am by no means depressed but this book really made me look at my life and my future in a whole new light. You can tell when reading the book that the author is very familiar with the subject matter and I am currently going through some big changes in life as I am stopping full-time work and going back to get my degree over the next few years. A friend of mine recommended this book and I am really glad that they did as it really does inspire contentment and a sense of peace with the way life is. I am by no means depressed but this book really made me look at my life and my future in a whole new light. You can tell when reading the book that the author is very familiar with the subject matter and has researched it thoroughly. It is true that there are any number of natural disasters that can end life as we know it. This book is odd in the way that it works on 2 levels it makes your more aware of your own mortality and of the possible threats to human existence yet it also makes you feel safer and more content with life at the same time. Overall No Solid Ground is one of those must-read books for everyone. I think this is the kind of book that will offer a different experience for different people but I think that everyone who reads it will feel more at peace by the end.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah P.

    This is a book that serves both as a call of action and a guide for achieving happiness in a dangerous and struggling world. I really enjoyed the way this book promotes ways to find contentment and a personal philosophy for finding calm and peace in a chaotic world. I admit it has allayed some of my fears about the future and allowed me to have a new attitude of confidence in the future through deep self reflection. One of the best on the subject, highly recommended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I have to admit I was skeptical when a friend of mine first recommended this book to me, but as soon as I started reading it I was hooked. Not only was this an interesting read, but it left me thinking long after I finished it. Miller has a voice that most writers can only aspire to, but more than that, he addresses subjects that will leave the reader feeling inspired. Overall, I highly enjoyed this read and definitely recommend it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  14. 4 out of 5

    David Henry

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark Jun

  16. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Ng

  17. 4 out of 5

    Deanna Kelsey

  18. 5 out of 5

    Earle

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gad

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Red Dust

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pyang

  23. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pam Mooney

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steve Sengele

  28. 4 out of 5

    J

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

  30. 4 out of 5

    Skylar

  31. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  32. 5 out of 5

    K.

  33. 4 out of 5

    Walt Bristow

  34. 5 out of 5

    Lori

  35. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Reader

  36. 5 out of 5

    SunnyBunny251

  37. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Pooser

  38. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Santiago

  39. 5 out of 5

    Kaite

  40. 5 out of 5

    Katlin Collins

  41. 4 out of 5

    Katie Harder-schauer

  42. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

  43. 4 out of 5

    Christina Borgoyn

  44. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Varnadore

  45. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Cole Marie Mckinnon

  46. 4 out of 5

    Wendi Dusek

  47. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  48. 5 out of 5

    Angela Nicholson

  49. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  50. 5 out of 5

    Rand

  51. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  52. 5 out of 5

    David Bathurst

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.