web site hit counter The Writer's Guide to Weapons: A Practical Reference for Using Firearms and Knives in Fiction - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Writer's Guide to Weapons: A Practical Reference for Using Firearms and Knives in Fiction

Availability: Ready to download

When it comes to writing weapons, most authors shoot from the hip--and miss. The Writer's Guide to Weapons will help you hit your target every time. Firearms and knives have starring roles in a wide range of genres--crime, thriller, war, mystery, Western, and more. Unfortunately, many depictions of weapons in novels and film are pure fiction. Knowing the difference between When it comes to writing weapons, most authors shoot from the hip--and miss. The Writer's Guide to Weapons will help you hit your target every time. Firearms and knives have starring roles in a wide range of genres--crime, thriller, war, mystery, Western, and more. Unfortunately, many depictions of weapons in novels and film are pure fiction. Knowing the difference between a shotshell and a slug, a pistol and a revolver, or a switchblade and a butterfly knife is essential for imbuing your story with authenticity--and gaining popularity with discerning readers. Inside you'll find: An in-depth look at the basics of firearms and knives: how they work, why they work, what they look like, and how to depict them accurately in your stories. The biggest weapons myths in fiction, TV, and film. A surefire guide for choosing the correct weapon for your characters, no matter their skill level, strength, or background. A review of major gun and knife laws, weapons safety tips,and common police tactics. "The Hit List," showcasing the most popular weapons for spies, detectives, gunslingers, gangsters, military characters, and more. Examples highlighting inaccurate vs. accurate weapons depictions. An insightful foreword by David Morrell, the award-winning creator of Rambo. Equal parts accessible, humorous, and practical, The Writer's Guide to Weapons is the one resource you need to incorporate firearms and knives into your fiction like a seasoned professional.


Compare

When it comes to writing weapons, most authors shoot from the hip--and miss. The Writer's Guide to Weapons will help you hit your target every time. Firearms and knives have starring roles in a wide range of genres--crime, thriller, war, mystery, Western, and more. Unfortunately, many depictions of weapons in novels and film are pure fiction. Knowing the difference between When it comes to writing weapons, most authors shoot from the hip--and miss. The Writer's Guide to Weapons will help you hit your target every time. Firearms and knives have starring roles in a wide range of genres--crime, thriller, war, mystery, Western, and more. Unfortunately, many depictions of weapons in novels and film are pure fiction. Knowing the difference between a shotshell and a slug, a pistol and a revolver, or a switchblade and a butterfly knife is essential for imbuing your story with authenticity--and gaining popularity with discerning readers. Inside you'll find: An in-depth look at the basics of firearms and knives: how they work, why they work, what they look like, and how to depict them accurately in your stories. The biggest weapons myths in fiction, TV, and film. A surefire guide for choosing the correct weapon for your characters, no matter their skill level, strength, or background. A review of major gun and knife laws, weapons safety tips,and common police tactics. "The Hit List," showcasing the most popular weapons for spies, detectives, gunslingers, gangsters, military characters, and more. Examples highlighting inaccurate vs. accurate weapons depictions. An insightful foreword by David Morrell, the award-winning creator of Rambo. Equal parts accessible, humorous, and practical, The Writer's Guide to Weapons is the one resource you need to incorporate firearms and knives into your fiction like a seasoned professional.

30 review for The Writer's Guide to Weapons: A Practical Reference for Using Firearms and Knives in Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    K.M. Weiland

    Crazily entertaining for a straightforward info manual. I learned a couple new things and think it will be a good resource for the future.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    This is an amazing book. A brilliant book. BUY THIS BOOK! Really, I could leave this review just there; those three sentences sum up all you need to know. But that wouldn’t really be a review now, would it? The Writer’s Guide to Weapons does what it says on the tin. You know all those action films where people do improbable things with guns? You don’t need to be a master gunsmith to know that firearm’s occasionally need reloading, or that cars don’t just blow up as soon as they’re zinged by a st This is an amazing book. A brilliant book. BUY THIS BOOK! Really, I could leave this review just there; those three sentences sum up all you need to know. But that wouldn’t really be a review now, would it? The Writer’s Guide to Weapons does what it says on the tin. You know all those action films where people do improbable things with guns? You don’t need to be a master gunsmith to know that firearm’s occasionally need reloading, or that cars don’t just blow up as soon as they’re zinged by a stray bullet. But wait, do you know the difference between a bullet, a shell, it’s casing? Why do character’s pump their shotguns in that badass way to scare the baddies/goodies? Should they even be doing that? Then there are the practicalities. When writing a scene, just how should your character handle a firearm? Do they pull the hammer back? Rack the slide? Should they tilt their gun on its side like some gangbanger? And what gun or knife should I give to my hero or villain? If you’re a writer and have ever grappled with these or a myriad other problems, or if you’re just a reader who’s darn well interested to know what is real and what is b*******, then never fear, for Ben Sobieck is here! Along with a few friends he’s brought along for the ride, notably Maynard Soloman and Bill Robber (more on them in a sec.) Ben, an editor on various US firearms magazines, has penned a manual for those who know nothing about knives and gun, a bolts and all account that takes the reader from the basics and on through the mechanics of guns and knives. Along the way he slays myths – no don’t pump the shotgun in that badass way, you’re just ejecting a perfectly good shell – and helps you choose the best weapon for the characters of your story. You might fear that this is some dry technical manual, but no. Everything is explained in no nonsense and plain English. And just so you get it, hapless P.I. Maynard Soloman and his arch-nemesis Bill Robber are on hand to show you how NOT to do it. These sections are often hilariously funny and go to show just how wrong many writers of fiction can get it. Afterwards Ben reiterates just Soloman & Robber got it so wrong and just what they should have done instead, so there’s no real excuse for us writers to ever write it wrong again (Hollywood action movie script writers, take note). But that’s just the book, there’s also an associated website which Ben updates regularly. And if all that isn’t enough there’s Ben himself. Like D.P. Lyle MD for writer’s forensics needs, Ben Sobieck is there for any writer’s queries about weapons. Example: in my novel I have a scene where the hero uses dead bodies from an earlier firefight as a physical barricade against a military SWAT team. So I emailed Ben and I asked him how long my character could survive when assailed by trained guys with military grade firearms. And Ben asks what type of body armour the corpses are wearing – military grade like the new attackers –goes away and crunches the numbers, consults colleagues. The he comes back and answers me and posts the whole thing on his blog. In other words he takes my crazy scenario seriously and the website continues to grow, a resource for all us writers. How cool is that? So in conclusion you can see why I say this book is awesome; why I suggest writers and readers alike purchase a copy.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bauer

    I've always thought I knew more about writing of weapons and fight scenes into my fiction than most, due to a misspent but very entertaining youth. That was until I read this book. Sobieck writes about the "details that matter" when it comes to including armed conflict in one's fiction. He dispels myths, sets the record straight and was invaluable in informing me of my gaps when it comes to matters of firearms and knife combat. While it is written in a dry tone, the author imparts volumes of know I've always thought I knew more about writing of weapons and fight scenes into my fiction than most, due to a misspent but very entertaining youth. That was until I read this book. Sobieck writes about the "details that matter" when it comes to including armed conflict in one's fiction. He dispels myths, sets the record straight and was invaluable in informing me of my gaps when it comes to matters of firearms and knife combat. While it is written in a dry tone, the author imparts volumes of knowledge in a no-frills, pragmatic manner which I enjoyed greatly. This book will sit on my shelf next to Strunk & White and the Chicago Style Guide. Simply, an invaluable resource for writers who wish to add some realism to combat in their work. Highly recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Ángel Alonso Pulido

    Un excelente manual de referencia para escritores sobre armas de fuego y armas de filo. Si no eres capaz de distinguir una pistola de un revólver o desconoces la diferencia entre armas de repetición, automáticas y semiautomáticas, este es tu libro. Nada sustituye la experiencia real con armas, pero si no está a tu alcance, esta guía es el mejor sustituto.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katia M. Davis

    This is an easy to read reference guide to modern hand weaponry such as guns and knives. There are clear descriptions and illustrations as well as specifications for each weapon. It also includes incorrect written examples of prose and correct examples. There is an additional section towards the back that discusses things like military and police tactics as well as additional hardware. Very useful as a quick reference.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    Good info but kinda basic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    D.A. Henneman

    For anyone not familiar with weapons, but is writing a story that includes them, this guide is for you! The topics are formatted for quick reference, and allows for the author to get the information they need and get right back to writing. Each chapter includes photos and describes the advantages and disadvantages of each type of weapon in easy to read language. I especially liked that the author included writing examples, inaccurate vs. accurate, giving a clear idea of what to avoid when describ For anyone not familiar with weapons, but is writing a story that includes them, this guide is for you! The topics are formatted for quick reference, and allows for the author to get the information they need and get right back to writing. Each chapter includes photos and describes the advantages and disadvantages of each type of weapon in easy to read language. I especially liked that the author included writing examples, inaccurate vs. accurate, giving a clear idea of what to avoid when describing a scene. I recommend this handy resource for any writer that plans on including weapons in their plot. For any information that was not covered in the guide, the author recommends contacting him at CrimeFictionBook.com with questions, or following him on Facebook or Twitter.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Marinovich

    A must-have book for all action, thriller, crime, war and history authors. Detailed information on all sorts of weapons, and, how-to write them into your scenes. Also, how not to fall into the myths and "tropes" that Hollywood lull us all into. Well written with a humorous steak, I have already changed a couple of things in two of my manuscripts which I am working on. A worthwhile reference book in your library. Highly recommended A must-have book for all action, thriller, crime, war and history authors. Detailed information on all sorts of weapons, and, how-to write them into your scenes. Also, how not to fall into the myths and "tropes" that Hollywood lull us all into. Well written with a humorous steak, I have already changed a couple of things in two of my manuscripts which I am working on. A worthwhile reference book in your library. Highly recommended

  9. 4 out of 5

    PerishTheThought

    A solid introduction to the basics of gun and knife use. Well-written and funny, I sped through this in a couple of hours. Granted, most of it I'd picked up from research other places, but I sure would have saved myself a lot of time if I'd had one resource, like this one, where I could find everything I needed. Be sure and complement this with a trip to your local gun (and knife) store so you can see and hold the real thing, and then spend some time on the range if you can. Good stuff. A solid introduction to the basics of gun and knife use. Well-written and funny, I sped through this in a couple of hours. Granted, most of it I'd picked up from research other places, but I sure would have saved myself a lot of time if I'd had one resource, like this one, where I could find everything I needed. Be sure and complement this with a trip to your local gun (and knife) store so you can see and hold the real thing, and then spend some time on the range if you can. Good stuff.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    Awesome book for writers wanting to include firearms or knives in their fiction. Explains myths used in films and books, and goes above and beyond in explaining not only weapons but gun/knife laws, holster specifics, scopes, and much much more. Will always help you match a gun or knife to your characters.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matilda

    Great book if you're interested in writing about violence using weapons. It's clear, concise and provides enough information to write a realistic scene. Great book if you're interested in writing about violence using weapons. It's clear, concise and provides enough information to write a realistic scene.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Hirsch

    This is a more than serviceable guide for writers who want to incorporate the realistic use of weapons in their fiction, and, more importantly, to make sure they pair the right weapon to the character, since weapons themselves have qualities that either would or wouldn't accord with a character based on whether he or she was a good or bad guy, strong or weak individual. No, this book hasn't supplanted my go-to guide when I want to scan pictures of weapons and read their specs (that would be "Gun: This is a more than serviceable guide for writers who want to incorporate the realistic use of weapons in their fiction, and, more importantly, to make sure they pair the right weapon to the character, since weapons themselves have qualities that either would or wouldn't accord with a character based on whether he or she was a good or bad guy, strong or weak individual. No, this book hasn't supplanted my go-to guide when I want to scan pictures of weapons and read their specs (that would be "Gun: A Visual History") but yes, you could do a lot worse than "The Writer's Guide to Weapons." I'm fond of saying that, regardless of one's field, you're never too advanced to go back and read a beginner's manual. I'm not Johnny Rambo and I don't pleasure myself to back issues of "Soldier of Fortune," but I was an active duty soldier who saw service and carried an M16, M4, and Squad 249. That said, and circling back to what I said about beginner's manuals, that doesn't mean I won't occasionally make a mistake and write something about a gun that's cringe-worthy and inept (actually, come to think of it, in the military we were discouraged from calling our firearms "guns" for some reason, so you see how important words are when dealing with this stuff). Say "clip" when you mean "magazine" (which I've done) and you'll embarrass yourself with the purists and hardcores who keep an eye out for such novice mistakes. Most importantly, Benjamin Sobieck has his own style, and strong sense of humor, making each block of instruction an easy one to sit through. His two characters he uses for examples of what to do and what not to do, Maynard Soloman and Bill Robber, function as their own fun, extended gag that keeps things light without sacrificing any of the serious info being delivered in the course of the sometimes gut-busting humor. My favorite vignette was one in which one of the two adversaries snipes his quarry, who's having a family reunion with his daughter at the local strip club where she works. His parting quip? "'Nevaeh' isn't 'Heaven' spelled backwards. It's stripper spelled forwards." Those kinds of details are worth the price of admission alone. Recommended.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Bateson

    A rare gem for all writers needing information on firearms and knives This book makes some very big claims as to what it will cover, and it delivers on every single one. Now I’m far from being an expert on weapons, so when this book came to my attention, I was intrigued. I’ve written fight scenes into at least three of my short stories, and thankfully had people who were able to help me get my facts straight. However, this book is definitely one that is going to be referenced a lot for my novel, be A rare gem for all writers needing information on firearms and knives This book makes some very big claims as to what it will cover, and it delivers on every single one. Now I’m far from being an expert on weapons, so when this book came to my attention, I was intrigued. I’ve written fight scenes into at least three of my short stories, and thankfully had people who were able to help me get my facts straight. However, this book is definitely one that is going to be referenced a lot for my novel, because there are going to be a lot more weapons involved. Why? Let’s look at what this book does: * it neatly breaks down the weapons by group, style and use. * it discusses the basics of the laws surrounding the weapons, well as safety tips. * it includes guides on how to select weapons for your characters (or even yourself). * it covers ways particular weapons can be used in and busts some of the myths that were created by movies and fiction. * it includes a glossary of terms and a basic list of weapons. And if all of that isn’t enough, the bonus downloads and links make this guide indispensable. If you’re a writer, and you’re not intimately familiar with weapons, this is a must have book. If you are familiar with weapons, this book may just give you ideas that might not otherwise have occurred to you, because you overlooked them.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris Norbury

    A highly useful and informative book for fiction writers that has earned a permanent spot on my writing reference shelf. The book focuses mainly on guns and knives, which is a slight disappointment since I'd prefer to own one weapons reference that covers most of the practical and obtainable weapons currently available. But the gun section is thoroughly detailed, which will cover probably about 90% of the weapon needs and questions for most writers. I got a bit tired of the author's characters--M A highly useful and informative book for fiction writers that has earned a permanent spot on my writing reference shelf. The book focuses mainly on guns and knives, which is a slight disappointment since I'd prefer to own one weapons reference that covers most of the practical and obtainable weapons currently available. But the gun section is thoroughly detailed, which will cover probably about 90% of the weapon needs and questions for most writers. I got a bit tired of the author's characters--Maynard Solomon and Bill the Robber-- being inserted into the illustrative vignettes of good examples and flawed examples of writing weapons scenes because they were so over the top silly. But the core text of each example showed the subtle errors that most authors can easily make if they choose to gloss over their weapons scenes. If you're a fiction writer who includes weapons in your work, check this out.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Brown

    Useful book for any fiction writer whose WIP involves weapons. Lots of specific information and the author keeps it practical for a writer to be accurate without bogging down in detail.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    An invaluable guide.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    I thought I'd find the example passages more helpful than they were. A list of phrases to go with each weapon would have been useful. I think I might end up making my own for quick reference. But otherwise 5+ stars. Very useful. I thought I'd find the example passages more helpful than they were. A list of phrases to go with each weapon would have been useful. I think I might end up making my own for quick reference. But otherwise 5+ stars. Very useful.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Diana Thayer

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elesa

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vega

  23. 4 out of 5

    J.E.S. Hays

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tory

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Brinkley

  26. 4 out of 5

    David Titleman

  27. 4 out of 5

    C Sheppard

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sherrie Spitz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mara

  30. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Shaffer

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.