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Herge Comics: Tintin In Congo

30 review for Herge Comics: Tintin In Congo...

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Tintin au Congo = Tintin in the Congo (Tintin #2), Hergé Tintin in the Congo (French: Tintin au Congo) is the second volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Commissioned by the conservative Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, it was serialised weekly from May 1930 to June 1931 before being published in a collected volume by Éditions de Petit Vingtième in 1931. The story tells of young Belgian reporter T Tintin au Congo = Tintin in the Congo (Tintin #2), Hergé Tintin in the Congo (French: Tintin au Congo) is the second volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Commissioned by the conservative Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, it was serialised weekly from May 1930 to June 1931 before being published in a collected volume by Éditions de Petit Vingtième in 1931. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who are sent to the Belgian Congo to report on events in the country. Amid various encounters with the native Congolese people and wild animals, Tintin unearths a criminal diamond smuggling operation run by the American gangster Al Capone. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 2000 میلادی عنوان: تن تن در کنگو - کتاب دوم؛ نویسنده: هرژه؛ مترجم: خسرو سمیعی؛ تهران، یونیورسال، 1354، در 62 ص، موضوع: داستانهای گرافیکی و فکاهی نویسندگان - سده 20 م ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dirk Grobbelaar

    Ah, the infamous Tintin Au Congo. This is the edition that is widely available these days, i.e. the redrawn, coloured and “sanitized” version. Comparisons between the original art and the art on display here shows that originally it didn’t look much different than Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, if perhaps slightly better. In fact, Tintin looks like something from a Black & White Quick & Flupke story in the original version (unsurprisingly, since it is by the same author / artist). Why bring Ah, the infamous Tintin Au Congo. This is the edition that is widely available these days, i.e. the redrawn, coloured and “sanitized” version. Comparisons between the original art and the art on display here shows that originally it didn’t look much different than Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, if perhaps slightly better. In fact, Tintin looks like something from a Black & White Quick & Flupke story in the original version (unsurprisingly, since it is by the same author / artist). Why bring this up? Because, frankly, I believe that the earlier art suits the story better. This isn’t that much different from In the Land of the Soviets as far as plot development and ham handed comedy is concerned, but it looks like one of the later books, which can create one heck of a false expectation. This book has received a lot of bad press, and has not been published for many years as a result. The following excerpt is from the introduction of this edition: In his portrayal of the Belgian Congo, the young Hergé reflects the colonial attitudes of the time. [the book was first published in book form in 1931, and presented as a strip even before then] He himself admitted that he depicted the African people according to the bourgeois, paternalistic stereotypes of the period – an interpretation that some of today’s readers may find offensive. The same could be said of his treatment of big-game hunting. The same could also be said of many other (and in some cases iconic) novels, such as King Solomon's Mines and Jock of the Bushveld. Again: I suggest reading Tintin in the Congo with a companion book like Tintin: Hergé and His Creation. The author himself wasn’t fond of this book, and especially of the treatment of wildlife. So there it is. The first two Tintin books are important for their historical significance in the sense that Hergé was pioneering the European comic style that we take for granted today, but they are far from his best work. Thankfully, after this things start improving greatly. Hergé was about to “grow up”. As with Tintin in the Land of the Soviets giving this more than three would not make sense given the greatness of what was to come.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    As a child, when I first read Hergé's Tintin comic books (graphic novels) in German, and when I still rather tended to enjoy even some of the more politically incorrect and problematic earlier instalments, already at that time (in the late 70s), Tintin au Congo regularly and generally tended to make me both physically and mentally cringe at the blatant stereotyping, the colonialism, the overt and nasty racism depicted (so much so, that I actually never managed to fully finish reading the book un As a child, when I first read Hergé's Tintin comic books (graphic novels) in German, and when I still rather tended to enjoy even some of the more politically incorrect and problematic earlier instalments, already at that time (in the late 70s), Tintin au Congo regularly and generally tended to make me both physically and mentally cringe at the blatant stereotyping, the colonialism, the overt and nasty racism depicted (so much so, that I actually never managed to fully finish reading the book until I was a teenager, in 1982, usually giving up in disgust at both the content and the presented thematics of Tintin au Congo, as well as at the frustrating fact that when I would ask my parents about episodes and illustrations that I considered blatant racism, they generally simply claimed that it was a sign of the times and to therefore not worry so much about it). And while, perhaps, my parents were indeed somewhat correct in claiming the latter (that the racism depicted was indeed very much a sign of the times), that does in NO WAY excuse the unfortunate and nasty truth that Tintin au Congo is simply and utterly replete with questionable content and patently unacceptable loathsome euro-centric colonialist attitudes. And also, aside from the ever-present colonialism and ethnic stereotyping (making almost ALL of the native African characters appear as at best childishly simplistic and at worst corrupt and stupid, not to mention how they have been illustrated, with protruding caricature like lips, and speaking broken pidgin French), there are equally far far too many uncritical, condoning and even positive representations of so-called trophy hunting featured (as basically, Tintin is in Africa not only to tour the continent but also and obviously to seemingly "bag" as many species of animals as possible), and as such, an attitude that Africa as a continent is there for the taking, is there for the manifest destiny of European expansion and use/abuse is definitely to be found in Tintin au Congo (and whether politically or religiously, that really and truly matters not or at least should not matter). And while early children's literature (both novels and illustrated offerings) does indeed contain many similarly questionable details, the fact that Tintin au Congo contains such an encompassing amount of the same (massive amounts of dead, of deliberately slaughtered African animal species, as well as almost every page presenting Africans as simpletons, as almost lesser human beings), this in my opinion does make Tintin au Congo negatively and frustratingly stand hugely out. And yes, I do well realise some readers as well as literary analysts have claimed that the overabundance of the ethnic stereotyping, the colonialism, the over-eager (read extreme) hunting behaviour and practices in Tintin au Congo might, in fact, be of satiric intent, that Hergé (like Jonathan Swift) is showing, is presenting an expanded and exaggerated portrait of Africa and colonialism in order to criticise, in order to hold up a mirror to society, to the crowned heads of Europe (so to speak). But while this might be partially correct for some of the later Tintin graphic novels (where humour and satiric intent is definitely both present and easily appreciated, easily noticed), the storyline (even if at times somewhat exaggerated) of Tintin in Congo really never reads and never feels (in my humble opinion) as being all that satirical or in any way much critical of colonialism (for in Tintin au Congo, the attitude towards Africa and towards Africans is at best massively paternalistic and as such both frustrating and so annoying that I can only and will only consider a one star rating maximum and really would love to grant negative stars). And with regard to recommending Tintin au Congo, I would ONLY EVER suggest it to and for teenagers and adults (and even then only for historical and academic research and analysis purposes, for discussions and debates on colonialism and what should NOT really be included, should not be featured in children's literature). And finally, considering recent medical advances (and the fact that we are now rather confident that repeated head injuries, that concussions and the like can and often will lead to serious and lasting cognitive issues and other health related problems), the vast amount of times that Tintin (especially) is knocked unconscious, is bonked on the head, is drugged, is rendered immobile, is seemingly seriously injured is also (at least in my humble opinion) a cause for both concern and need for discussion (as Tintin never seems to show ANY major post trauma ill effects, a scenario that is at best a bit naive and at worst potentially dangerous, as it could make readers, but especially children think that the dangers Tintin faces and the injuries he receives are not all that serious, and that therefore, concussions and the like are also not all that serious, something that might have well been the general consensus when the Tintin books were first published, but an attitude that is definitely not so much the case nowadays, as in fact, rather the opposite seems to be the standard currently accepted position).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    I recently read TinTin in the Congo and found it a delightful book. The text is humorous and the artwork is (as always with Herge's works) well done and entertaining. I recommend this volume for any age; I especially recommend it as a fun book to read to your children or grandchildren. The hand wringing from the easily offended politically correct crowd to the contrary notwithstanding, this book accurately captures the impressions that anyone from an advanced country would have in travelling to I recently read TinTin in the Congo and found it a delightful book. The text is humorous and the artwork is (as always with Herge's works) well done and entertaining. I recommend this volume for any age; I especially recommend it as a fun book to read to your children or grandchildren. The hand wringing from the easily offended politically correct crowd to the contrary notwithstanding, this book accurately captures the impressions that anyone from an advanced country would have in travelling to remote areas of a more primitive culture. For all the heartburn of some westerners over "colonialism", I suspect that a trip to outback areas of the Congo in 2009 would present them with a rather unpleasant brush-up with reality. Read and enjoy!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Crane

    I’m giving this book 4 stars purely as a collectors edition to make up the full Tintin series & as a piece of literary history, otherwise it would have scored zero. It’s a terrible story. It’s horribly patronising towards Africans & for that alone was not stocked in book shops for years. Plus it features Tintin hunting beautiful animals, such as Elephants, that today are rightfully protected. I’ve explained these facts to my parents & they don’t want to read the book for fear of it tainting a ch I’m giving this book 4 stars purely as a collectors edition to make up the full Tintin series & as a piece of literary history, otherwise it would have scored zero. It’s a terrible story. It’s horribly patronising towards Africans & for that alone was not stocked in book shops for years. Plus it features Tintin hunting beautiful animals, such as Elephants, that today are rightfully protected. I’ve explained these facts to my parents & they don’t want to read the book for fear of it tainting a character they have come to know & love as a hero. Such a shame this book was produced but at the same time it exhibits colonial European attitudes of yore that we would do well to remember & never repeat.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Harry Whitewolf

    I’ve just read an online article that asks the question “Is chess racist?” after someone enquired as to why the white pieces move first. Seeing as the definition of racism, according to the Cambridge English dictionary is: “The belief that people's qualities are influenced by their race and that the members of other races are not as good as the members of your own, or the resulting unfair treatment of members of other races”, it would seem that the answer to the question “Is chess racist?” is no I’ve just read an online article that asks the question “Is chess racist?” after someone enquired as to why the white pieces move first. Seeing as the definition of racism, according to the Cambridge English dictionary is: “The belief that people's qualities are influenced by their race and that the members of other races are not as good as the members of your own, or the resulting unfair treatment of members of other races”, it would seem that the answer to the question “Is chess racist?” is no. Inanimate chess pieces or the concept of the game of chess itself cannot be prejudiced against people’s skin colour. My point is: the meaning of racism is quickly changing. It now seems to have little to do with hatred, but everything to do with word-choice. I see that as dangerous, as word-control leads to suppressing free speech. And retaining free speech is every bit as important as stopping racism. We’ll soon be agreeing that 2 + 2 = 5 a la Orwell’s 1984. Modern racism also has to do with banning things from previous times because they do not reflect our modern values towards racism, as we have recently seen. Was I proud to see protestors taking down the statue of slave-trader Colston? Absofuckinglutely. Does that mean I think every statue that has tentative links to racism should be taken down? Not necessarily. These issues aren’t, um, black or white. But what I do know is, many of the Twitter crowd of Lefties (who resemble little of “the Left” I once knew) seem to be addressing racism in all the wrong places. I don’t need to go into the very real and dangerous racism that is happening in the world right now. We’re all aware that racist cunts exist and hate. And they seem to be coming out of the woodwork like never before. Why, just last night I ended up shouting and swearing at my neighbour who believes England “is a white country”, and I will always stand up against racism when I hear it and I encourage everybody else to do the same. The problem, I believe, is that too many people are calling things racist when those things have absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with HATE. It’s racist HATE we need to fight against. Forget everything else. If you call for books, art, or recorded entertainment from bygone years when attitudes were different to be banned, I will stand against your beliefs just like I stand up to racists. And when Amazon, the BBC and others remove things like Gone with the Wind, Little Britain, and The League of Gentlemen because they apparently show racist views (the latter two don’t), they’re not banning them because they believe that. They’re banning them to show you that Amazon are a caring company who are down with the millennial Left. It’s bullshit. I do not, and will never, support the banning of books and art. And a brief look back at history will tell you why. The very nature of society means its views are constantly changing and evolving. Everybody knows the views expressed in Ancient Rome were not the same as those expressed in Victorian times, and those expressed in Victorian times are not the same as those expressed in modern times. What good it does to ban past attitudes, I really don’t know. But I could list you hundreds of things for the bad it does. I mean, should we ban The Water Babies because it depicts child labour? Should we ban virtually every film of the 1940s for depicting sexism? Should we ban the Bible because it glorifies violence? And yet, why you all call for things like the Gone with the Wind film to be banned, you can still (rightly so) buy and read Mein Kampf. And in twenty years’ time, the new generation will be saying it was racist for people in the 2010s and 20s to always name black characters something that indicates they are black, such as The Dark Destroyer and Black Panther. And plenty of other future-phobic things that are currently not an issue. So, rather than calling someone who doesn’t want chess rules changed (so that white pieces don’t always go first) a racist, and rather than condemning Matt Lucas and David Walliams for racism, and rather than condemning JK Rowling as transphobic, ask yourselves instead: DID THEY INTEND TO BE HATEFUL? If the answer is no, leave them the fuck alone and move on to calling out the actual racists and fascists and implementing ways to improve race (and cultural, and gender…) relations. I keep seeing too many good people on the side of good race relations being attacked by some of the very people they support. And those acts are unfortunately making more people become racist. And so, finally, to Tintin in the Congo. A book that was unavailable for a long time because it depicts white supremacy views and the Congolese as almost-golliwogs. The editions that are now available come with a special caveat that states the book reflects the colonial attitudes of the time, and that Herge himself later regretted his depictions. I was pleased that the foreword also says “the same thing could be said of big game hunting” about the book’s portrayal of many senseless killings of beautiful African mammals. Using a foreword to explain outdated concepts, particularly in children’s books, is of course the most sensible thing to do. Banning the book would not. I decided to start reading all the Tintin books in order, but I don’t own them all, so I was delayed because I didn’t want to buy the Collector’s Edition of this second Tintin story that is in black and white; as it first appeared in newspaper-format. I wanted this early 2000s colour edition, based on an earlier edition Herge redrew and coloured himself. The only thing is, this edition isn’t available to buy new and second-hand ones on ebay usually go for around £50. Well, I wasn’t going to fork out £50 for a racist Tintin book! Then a couple of weeks ago, I found an ebay seller who obviously didn’t know what they had, and I bought the book for under a tenner. Seeing as this was right in the middle of the BLM protests after the despicable killing of George Floyd, and people starting to knock down statues and ban movies left, right, and centre, the timing of me finally getting my mitts on a copy of this book seemed very synchronistic. I guess I’m probably the last generation to have had golliwogs. As a young kid, I had a soft-toy one and the figurines that everyone collected from Robertson’s jam. I didn’t associate golliwogs with black people. But I’m still very glad golliwogs no longer have a place in society. But even as someone who had gollies as a kid, I was still shocked when I opened the first page of this Tintin book that depicted black people. They really do look more like golliwogs than people. Fuck, some even look more like monkeys. That actually shocked me! As did Tintin’s right wing behaviour. And the depictions of black people as simple, lazy, and white-master-loving. As with the first book in the series, Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, which I reviewed recently, the Belgian reporter resembles little of the liberal hero of the later books. At times, I wanted to give Tintin a good slap. As for the story, there’s a bit more of one than in the predecessor but still nothing much happens. But this book does set the scene for the next book Tintin in America, which was the first Tintin book to be printed as a book rather than as a newspaper comic strip, and which was where the Tintin series really began. After all, when I grew up, I didn’t even know Tintin in the Land of the Soviets and Tintin in the Congo existed. Like many, I always thought of Tintin in America as the first book. I’ll leave you with this scene from the hilarious Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder film Silver Streak. Ask yourself: is it racist? ;) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgAxv...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alix West

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Uh, this book is freaking terrible. And not just the racism--it lacks all semblance of a plot. You can read my review here, and instead of reading the actual book you can just read the notes I took while reading it: Milou gets in a fight with a parrot, Milou gets surgery, Milou falls overboard, Tintin rescues him, Tintin gets attacked by a shark, Tintin arrives in Africa and everyone greets him at the dock and cheers and carries him around, Milou gets attacked by mosquitoes, a bunch of papers wan Uh, this book is freaking terrible. And not just the racism--it lacks all semblance of a plot. You can read my review here, and instead of reading the actual book you can just read the notes I took while reading it: Milou gets in a fight with a parrot, Milou gets surgery, Milou falls overboard, Tintin rescues him, Tintin gets attacked by a shark, Tintin arrives in Africa and everyone greets him at the dock and cheers and carries him around, Milou gets attacked by mosquitoes, a bunch of papers want to pay Tintin stupid money to write for them, Tintin gets a car and a servant named Coco, a crocodile tries to eat Milou, someone steals Tintin’s car while Coco is scared and hides in the bushes, Tintin gets car back and ties up thief, Tintin kills an entire herd of antelope (animal death toll: +10), A chimpanzee kidnaps Milou, Tintin kills another Chimpanzee (+11), skins it, and climbs into its skin to get Milou back, then scares Coco the useless servant, the thief escapes, Tintin’s car gets stuck on the railroad tracks and gets hit by a train, Tintin tells the people to fix the train and calls them lazy, and also doesn’t help, Tintin tows the train to the station and meets a tribal chief, Tintin gets attacked by a lion and milou rips the lion’s tail off, all the native people are afraid of the lion and impressed by Tintin’s bravery, a witch-doctor is jealous of Tintin’s popularity and says the Gods have told him Tintin needs to be sacrificed. He pairs up with the villain from before and they plot to kill Tintin, but Tintin escapes and films the two of them plotting, and then outs the witch-doctor to the rest of the tribe and he is run out of town, Tintin is like King Solomon of the native people, the angry witch-doctor and mysterious thief try to start a war with a rival tribe, but it backfires and they start worshipping Tintin instead the witch-doctor hears that Tintin is hunting leopards, so dresses as a leopard to scare Tintin even though that makes no sense, but then he is attacked by a snake and Tintin saves him and now he also worships Tintin, the thief who is now bearded attacks Tintin and dangles him above a bunch of crocodiles, another white man comes and shoots 8 or so crocodiles dead (+19), Milou gets eaten by a snake, but Tintin saves him (+20), Tintin goes to teach in an African school, but the kids are really dumb and can’t add 2+2, and then a leopard comes in the classroom but it’s ok, because Tintin scares it off, Tintin tries to shoot an elephant but fails, and then the elephant chases him, but a chimpanzee picks up his gun and shoots the elephant (+21), the newly bearded villain shows up again and, after knocking tintin unconcious, tries to push him in a canoe over a waterfall, but Tintin is saved at the last second by a dangling tree branch, Milou fetches the other white dude and they save Tintin, Tintin and the bearded villain fight and then fall off a cliff, and Tintin is saved because he bounces off a hippo like a trampoline, but the villain gets eaten by crocodiles, Milou becomes some pygmies god, Tintin pretends to be the dead beared villain and meets some other villains, Tintin finds out that the villains were all part of a gang of Chicago mobsters and round them up, Tintin needlessly harasses some more animals, including drilling a hole in a Rhino, sticking in a stick of dynamite, and blowing it up (+22) and also kiling a buffalo (+23), some people in a plane save him and he goes home, and all the Africans are sad because Tintin left.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tintin

    Awkward to have such a moment archived.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Hmmm, this was a bit of a disappointment. I have heard how racist this book was, and Herge did choose to draw all of the African natives in a very sterotypical early 20th century way, and they aren't quite as smart as Tintin is, but from the three books of Herge's I've read now no one is really as smart as Tintin in the stories. They way the natives talk is a kind of stilted 'dumb' sort of way, but Herge also does this with the Soviets in the first Tintin book, and with the Mafia gangsters in th Hmmm, this was a bit of a disappointment. I have heard how racist this book was, and Herge did choose to draw all of the African natives in a very sterotypical early 20th century way, and they aren't quite as smart as Tintin is, but from the three books of Herge's I've read now no one is really as smart as Tintin in the stories. They way the natives talk is a kind of stilted 'dumb' sort of way, but Herge also does this with the Soviets in the first Tintin book, and with the Mafia gangsters in the America story. Well not exactly the same way, but he uses gross sterotypes . I was expecting something more racist, this wasn't anymore racist than certain Bugs Bunny cartoons I can remember watching growing up. Then there is the cartoon-ish violence against animals and people who say that Tintin killed too many animals, which also seems to me sort of a knee-jerk PC reaction, again it's nothing worse than I can remember seeing in lots of cartoons growing up. If anything this whole book is just the stereotype of European colonialism and an entire set of beliefs about the 'dark continent' (dark not meaning skin color, which of course is obvious), and the heroic / machoism of big game hunting. But then isn't really a surprise after reading the book about the Soviet Union. Herge's treatment of the Soviets is also a big jumble of confused facts and stereotypes, I mean do you think anyone ever said, "Oh my Trotsky!", instead of "oh my god", especially in a Soviet Union in the Stalinist era? I guess I just wanted to be actually shocked at the content of the book and not at the sensitivity of people.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Orion

    Tintin in the Congo, while written for the children's section of a Belgian newspaper in 1930, is so full of Eurocentric racism and speciesism that it cannot be recommended as reading for young people. However, as an example of white supremacy attitudes of the time, it is an interesting document. The book has often been left out of Tintin collections or edited to soften its most egregious content. I found two English language black and white (and one Spanish language color) editions online at www Tintin in the Congo, while written for the children's section of a Belgian newspaper in 1930, is so full of Eurocentric racism and speciesism that it cannot be recommended as reading for young people. However, as an example of white supremacy attitudes of the time, it is an interesting document. The book has often been left out of Tintin collections or edited to soften its most egregious content. I found two English language black and white (and one Spanish language color) editions online at www.Scribd.com, a document sharing website. The English copies at Scribd state that this book was "first published in the U.S.A. in 2002." In the Forward the translators say the author "admitted that he depicted his Africans according to the bourgeois, paternalistic stereotypes of the period. The same may be said of his treatment of big-game hunting and his attitude towards animals."

  11. 4 out of 5

    Piyangie

    This particular installment of the series was not included in the collection I bought. I didn't know about it until a goodread friend inquired from me about it. I was very much curious as to know why it was omitted to be included in the collection. Now that I have read it, I know why it wasn't included; and I'm not surprised at all. For a children's comic (or what I believe it to be), I'm surprised at the open racism and the animal cruelty that is shamelessly depicted throughout the story. Perhap This particular installment of the series was not included in the collection I bought. I didn't know about it until a goodread friend inquired from me about it. I was very much curious as to know why it was omitted to be included in the collection. Now that I have read it, I know why it wasn't included; and I'm not surprised at all. For a children's comic (or what I believe it to be), I'm surprised at the open racism and the animal cruelty that is shamelessly depicted throughout the story. Perhaps, at the time of his writing they were "accepted", but they are "outrageous" by modern standards. On top of it, there was absolutely no plot! It is such a poor excuse of a book! I'm very much dismayed with the beginning of the series that had I not known that there followed more interesting work despite the poor beginning, I would have given up reading of the series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cyndi

    I haven’t read in French since high school, so this was a double adventure. Always a pleasure to travel with TinTin and Snowy, even if some of the African representations are outdated and now considered racist.

  13. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    Like the last volume in the series, this one is another flop bearing no real resemblance to the themes, characters, or style of the later series. The whole thing is a haphazard cartoon filled with slapstick violence starring pugnacious jerk Tintin and his bad-joke-making dog. Yeah, the treatment of Africans and big game hunting make H. Rider Haggard look tame and responsible in comparison, though I find it hard to argue that the stylized drawings of the Africans are racist, since it's not like th Like the last volume in the series, this one is another flop bearing no real resemblance to the themes, characters, or style of the later series. The whole thing is a haphazard cartoon filled with slapstick violence starring pugnacious jerk Tintin and his bad-joke-making dog. Yeah, the treatment of Africans and big game hunting make H. Rider Haggard look tame and responsible in comparison, though I find it hard to argue that the stylized drawings of the Africans are racist, since it's not like the European characters are examples of detailed realism. I mean, when your main character's head is a mouthless blob with two pseudopods and tiny holes for eyes, it's hard to complain that other characters in the book are too simplistic. But yeah, another read that's only interesting to completists and cultural historians. My Suggested Reading In Comics

  14. 5 out of 5

    Farhana

    Umm it's kind of racist. In the first book (Tintin in the land of Soviets) Snowy the dog saves frozen Tintin by using salt as a freezing point depressor - quite scientific! In this issue, Snowy becomes afraid as it finds a spider in the morning, breaks a mirror on their voyage to Congo thinking these may bring them dangers. Quite superstitious by this time, to give away the notion of prevailing superstition among the African countries! Even in operating table Snowy becomes frightened seeing an Af Umm it's kind of racist. In the first book (Tintin in the land of Soviets) Snowy the dog saves frozen Tintin by using salt as a freezing point depressor - quite scientific! In this issue, Snowy becomes afraid as it finds a spider in the morning, breaks a mirror on their voyage to Congo thinking these may bring them dangers. Quite superstitious by this time, to give away the notion of prevailing superstition among the African countries! Even in operating table Snowy becomes frightened seeing an African and hides away . To comfort Snowy Tintin explains him using the word " That black ". :( The book is filled with many aspects from colonialism - whites are masters. And I particularly don't like Tintin's hunting episodes - kind of torture to the poor animals. :/

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    The Tintin stories for anyone who has read them and understands their history can't be viewed as anything other than groundbreaking. The beginnings of these stories have been around as long as the Lord of the Rings, the illustration and environments in the Tintin books are accurate and extremely detailed. Anyone who has spent even a little time exploring Herge (Georges Remi) can see the painstaking research and adversity he worked through to compose the world around Tintin. His ideas were ahead The Tintin stories for anyone who has read them and understands their history can't be viewed as anything other than groundbreaking. The beginnings of these stories have been around as long as the Lord of the Rings, the illustration and environments in the Tintin books are accurate and extremely detailed. Anyone who has spent even a little time exploring Herge (Georges Remi) can see the painstaking research and adversity he worked through to compose the world around Tintin. His ideas were ahead of his time (Exploring the moon, Industrialization, South American political conflict, modern slave trade, extraterrestrial life) and he made certain every detail for every object would be realistic (after the third book at least). Herge's work can certainly be cited as an influence for any modern day graphic novel or comic book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Luís

    I will not go for a first sociological criticism on the controversy surrounding this Tintin album! Others have done it, and much better than I could have done. This album is indeed full of clichés, but I believe that it is important to place oneself in the time in which it falls: the world was not as 'accessible' as it is today. All it takes is a little space on the credit card to have the world at our feet! Or an Internet connection, and you travel inexpensively. So there you have it ... Hergé I will not go for a first sociological criticism on the controversy surrounding this Tintin album! Others have done it, and much better than I could have done. This album is indeed full of clichés, but I believe that it is important to place oneself in the time in which it falls: the world was not as 'accessible' as it is today. All it takes is a little space on the credit card to have the world at our feet! Or an Internet connection, and you travel inexpensively. So there you have it ... Hergé introduced his readers to the world with Tintin. And it's still a comic, so, whether we agree or not, whether we are shocked or not, it remains that it comes out of the imagination of a creator. But beyond all that, me, what remains to me from this reading is the number of animals killed in this album !!! I didn't know Tintin could be so “gory”. Anyway, I've read it, but it's definitely not my favourite album of the series!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed

    Looks better artwise than the first volume but its a very weird book and not because of outdated,racist look on Africa. The treatment of the animals,the callaous way they are destroyed,the great white hunter thing disturbed me the most. Tintin was my childhood hero when i read the series but the first two volumes are not fun,the Tintin everyone knowns.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    Tintin at his racist best. I think this book has been pulled from publication everywhere.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dr Rashmit Mishra

    The last time I read this book I was fairly young and didn't have much of a moral code so reading it this time I come to realise how fairly despicable this book was and how it portrayed Tintin doing everything that I believe to be wrong From treating the natives of Congo as an inferior species , to treating them as slaves and then killing animals who were fairly innocent and then showing no remorse whatsoever for his action Granted the book belonged in a time period that believed in the darker to The last time I read this book I was fairly young and didn't have much of a moral code so reading it this time I come to realise how fairly despicable this book was and how it portrayed Tintin doing everything that I believe to be wrong From treating the natives of Congo as an inferior species , to treating them as slaves and then killing animals who were fairly innocent and then showing no remorse whatsoever for his action Granted the book belonged in a time period that believed in the darker tone of skin being nothing more than slaves and that believed hunting animals was good sport and as I mentioned earlier I myself as a child reading this never thought the events to be anything wrong . And yet now things have changed both for me personally and as per my beliefs also for this world and hence this book simply comes across as a sheer disappointment and a stain in one of my childhood idols face This re-read has guaranteed that I won't ever read or recommend this particular book In the Tintin series to anyone and hope that the memory of this book stays erased . At the same time I am scared to read the next books in the series in fear of finding other disturbing things and in so tainting my childhood further

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anwesha

    this is probably the only tintin stuff that I didn't like.I read it may be two years ago, and I was pretty sure that its a fake one,may be some one else wrote it (mine was a translated version). But when I googled it, I was kind of devastated.I grew up with Tintin , and loved him for his courage and intelligence, but in this book he acted like a racist animal hating jerk.I don't know whether Harge was a hardcore racist or just a product of his time, but this is the only book where he let me down this is probably the only tintin stuff that I didn't like.I read it may be two years ago, and I was pretty sure that its a fake one,may be some one else wrote it (mine was a translated version). But when I googled it, I was kind of devastated.I grew up with Tintin , and loved him for his courage and intelligence, but in this book he acted like a racist animal hating jerk.I don't know whether Harge was a hardcore racist or just a product of his time, but this is the only book where he let me down. Other than this one, I'm a die hard Tintin fan and consider Harge as one of the best cartoonists of all times.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Settare (on hiatus)

    As a diehard fan of Tintin, my heart breaks every time I think of how problematic this book is. But my feelings aren't significant in comparison with the catastrophic effects of racism and instilling colonial propaganda in children's books. This is probably the most problematic of all Tintin books, so much so that it's not published any longer in many places. When I read this as a child, I did notice the ridiculous depiction of Africans in it, but its problematic racism never registered with me w As a diehard fan of Tintin, my heart breaks every time I think of how problematic this book is. But my feelings aren't significant in comparison with the catastrophic effects of racism and instilling colonial propaganda in children's books. This is probably the most problematic of all Tintin books, so much so that it's not published any longer in many places. When I read this as a child, I did notice the ridiculous depiction of Africans in it, but its problematic racism never registered with me when I was seven years old. It does now. I try not to go near this one as it distresses me. And I know that Le Petit Vingtième (Hergé's publisher) had ordered him to set this book in Congo to encourage colonial sentiments in the audience. That's... horrible. As a lifelong Tintin fan, this is so difficult for me to come to terms with. But it is what it is, and denying it won't solve anything. I won't re-read this one, and I'll accept that my favorite childhood hero had so many dark and problematic moments. But the good news is, there are many other volumes in the series that aren't so overtly, terrifyingly racist as this one is, and I'll just stick with those. The text below is included in ALL of my reviews for the Tintin series. If you've already read it, please skip it. I am a lifelong fan of Tintin and Hergé. Tintin was the earliest memory I have of being exposed to books and stories, my dad started to read Tintin to me when I was less than three years old and continued to do so until I learned to read on my own. I have loved these stories my whole life, and I know all of them by heart, in Persian, in English, and in French. But, as a devout fan, I think it's time to do the hard but right thing: confess that these books are far from perfect. They are full of stereotypes, racist, whitewashed, colonialist, orientalist, you name it. Not to mention a complete lack of female characters (Bianca Castafiore is a mocking relic of the poor dear Maria Callas that Hergé hated, her maid Irma is present in approximately 20 frames, Alcazar's wife also, anyway, there aren't any significant female characters in these books). In the past few years, I've struggled to decide how I feel about these books. Will I dismiss them? Consider "the time they were written in" and excuse them? Love them in secret? Start disliking them? I don't know. So far I haven't reached a fixed decision, but I will say this: I am aware that these books are problematic. I acknowledge them. I don't stand for the message of some of these books. At the same time, I won't dismiss or hide my love for them because they were an integral part of my growing up memories and fantasies and games, and I do, still, love captain Haddock very much, stupid and ridiculous as he is. فهمیدنِ این که کتاب‌های مورد علاقه بچگیم مشکل‌زان، خیلی سخت بود و هست برام. فکر نمی‌کردم امکان داشته باشه به یه جلد تن‌تن چیزی کمتر از پنج ستاره بدم، ولی باید با واقعیت‌های تلخ کنار اومد. توضیح دادم که چرا این جوریه و ترجیح می‌دم این جلد رو به عنوان تاریخ سیاه هرژه بپذیرم و دیگه هم بهش برنگردم. شکستن قلبِ من به عنوان طرفدار اهمیتش خیلی کمتر از اثرات مخرب ریسیسم‌ه.

  22. 5 out of 5

    John

    I had to read this in French, because it has been banned in English. There seems to be a move to ban it in French as well. Here's an article in French about how they're trying to ban it in Belgium: http://www.lemonde.fr/culture/article... I'm definitely opposed to banning books simply because their opinions are out of fashion - this one was written in 1930 and has a very very patronising view of African people. However in 1930 it wasn't a work of evil, and it should not be considered one today. How I had to read this in French, because it has been banned in English. There seems to be a move to ban it in French as well. Here's an article in French about how they're trying to ban it in Belgium: http://www.lemonde.fr/culture/article... I'm definitely opposed to banning books simply because their opinions are out of fashion - this one was written in 1930 and has a very very patronising view of African people. However in 1930 it wasn't a work of evil, and it should not be considered one today. However, having spoken in the book's defence, it really is a pretty crappy story. "Tartarin de Tarascon" was written in 1872 and has a much more realistic view of Africa than "Tintin au Congo". I'm a big fan of Tintin because he has cool adventures in interesting parts of the world, but I just found the entire book to be silly, and it was a proper pain to read it. In summary: this book should be available for you to choose not to read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Borthwick

    It's not that this is one star dreck, it's more that I know what Herge was capable of and while the art is excellent, the story is utter rubbish - even ignoring the racism and animal cruelty - they catch the villains and then there's ten pages spent hunting animals to finish. We never revisit the village, so many plot points ignored and it's literally just wandering around finding animals and running away from them. It is a fascinating time capsule of a book, even this sanitised English translat It's not that this is one star dreck, it's more that I know what Herge was capable of and while the art is excellent, the story is utter rubbish - even ignoring the racism and animal cruelty - they catch the villains and then there's ten pages spent hunting animals to finish. We never revisit the village, so many plot points ignored and it's literally just wandering around finding animals and running away from them. It is a fascinating time capsule of a book, even this sanitised English translation but that is about all it has going for it. My rankings: 1) Tintin in the Congo - rubbish story, early work, only time this will be on top.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Meepelous

    Racism, imperialism, questionable big game hunting practices and publishers apology for all those things aside this is a pretty shit book. As far as the art goes, while the basic style is the same as all the other Tintin comics I've read, Herge only seemed able to draw a couple different kinds of people. So a lot of the characters end up looking the same with very minor differences. The characters are also pretty flat and lackluster in this story. Missing are most of the people that I've come to Racism, imperialism, questionable big game hunting practices and publishers apology for all those things aside this is a pretty shit book. As far as the art goes, while the basic style is the same as all the other Tintin comics I've read, Herge only seemed able to draw a couple different kinds of people. So a lot of the characters end up looking the same with very minor differences. The characters are also pretty flat and lackluster in this story. Missing are most of the people that I've come to associate with Tintin. Everyone who was there instead filled rather cliche and stereotypical rolls. Even Tintin himself is completely devoid of any character, serving only as a Gary Stew type character for readers to live out their childish dreams through. Moving along to the story, much like the characters the plot of this particular volume was extremely formulaic and cliche. I think Herge might have printed off a list of events that happen in boy's adventures stories set in Africa. With Tintin effortlessly traipsing through hazard after potentially thrilling hazard, everyone inexplicably knows who Tintin is and much like in Ben Hur the other characters immediately wonder at seeing such a person as the main character! While never (as I recall anyway) quite progressive, this early book does mark a rather low point for Herge. Of course, as the publisher duely notes, these ideas were very common for the time so we really shouldn't hold it against him. Or should we? I mean a freaking monkey speaks better English then the Congo natives! But really, I have no answer for this. I was a bit flummoxed as to why my library system seemed to have so very many copies of this book, not only because of its painfully outdated attitudes and lack of skill, but also because the publisher has done a very good job of practically erasing it from the Tintin mythos. Having read a majority of the Tintin books growing up I only recently discovered that this and The Land of the Soviets even existed. I think it's probably unwise to completely ignore the way things used to be. Especially because sometimes we really aren't all that different... Ultimately, as a privileged person, I do feel like this historical artifact of attitudes gone by did teach me more about the kinds of people we used to be, which obviously helps develop me into a more conscientious and thoughtful person in the future.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    The second of the Tintin adventures this one, like the first, is one I never read as a child. And I'm glad I didn't. Not political like the first one this volume is set in the Belgian Congo as it was known at the time. It is full of white European Imperialist ideas and beliefs. The native Africans are depicted with racist stereotypes and cruelty to animals abound. I see lots of 4 and 5 star "reviews" but I doubt those people have actually sat down and read this properly. Or at all. Thankfully the The second of the Tintin adventures this one, like the first, is one I never read as a child. And I'm glad I didn't. Not political like the first one this volume is set in the Belgian Congo as it was known at the time. It is full of white European Imperialist ideas and beliefs. The native Africans are depicted with racist stereotypes and cruelty to animals abound. I see lots of 4 and 5 star "reviews" but I doubt those people have actually sat down and read this properly. Or at all. Thankfully the next volume is the start of the newer version of Tintin and hopefully they'll get more enjoyable.

  26. 5 out of 5

    C.

    This is definitely one of the crappier Tintins. Quite apart from the rampant racism (context be damned, it's positively revolting) it's fragmentary and episodic in the extreme. Just as you think that he's disposed of the bad guy, he pops back up again and suddenly Tintin is running again. And there's a crocodile involved somewhere, and a kindly missionary (or was the missionary the bad guy?) and at one stage the Congolese tribe ends up worshipping Milou. Um. However, it was interesting to read th This is definitely one of the crappier Tintins. Quite apart from the rampant racism (context be damned, it's positively revolting) it's fragmentary and episodic in the extreme. Just as you think that he's disposed of the bad guy, he pops back up again and suddenly Tintin is running again. And there's a crocodile involved somewhere, and a kindly missionary (or was the missionary the bad guy?) and at one stage the Congolese tribe ends up worshipping Milou. Um. However, it was interesting to read the parts in Creole.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sara Bakhshi

    Why doesn't it have 0 stars?! I never thought there be a TinTin book worse than the previous one, but it was terrible!! How could it be so racist and OH! You should not teach these things to children! I'm just happy I didn't read it when I was a child. Why doesn't it have 0 stars?! I never thought there be a TinTin book worse than the previous one, but it was terrible!! How could it be so racist and OH! You should not teach these things to children! I'm just happy I didn't read it when I was a child.

  28. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    One to avoid if you are easily offended 8 April 2012 This is certainly not one of Herge's best works, in fact it is probably what most people think is the most offensive, which is why it was not translated into English until 1991. Okay, when I was a kid there was a German version available at the local library, and I did attempt to read it, however the problem was that I couldn't speak, let alone read, German. So technically this is the first time that I have actually read this album. Further, ev One to avoid if you are easily offended 8 April 2012 This is certainly not one of Herge's best works, in fact it is probably what most people think is the most offensive, which is why it was not translated into English until 1991. Okay, when I was a kid there was a German version available at the local library, and I did attempt to read it, however the problem was that I couldn't speak, let alone read, German. So technically this is the first time that I have actually read this album. Further, even if we ignore the racist references to the Africans (and there are quite a few of them) it is quite clear that this one of Herge's earliest works (and he did attempt to suppress it). The story itself is quite basic, namely Tintin travels to Africa to explore and take some wildlife photographs. On his way there he encounters a stowaway who seems to follow him everywhere, and once he has dealt with him, he then stumbles upon a diamond cartel headed up by Al Capone. Once he busts this cartel he then heads off to America to deal with Capone, and as such the story then shifts over the Tintin in America. The African natives are portrayed really badly in this album. They are painted as being ignorant, stupid, and superstitious. Further they are painted as falling down and worshipping white people. It is as if white man brings the good things to this godforsaken and barbaric land. Tintin is a hero and is very well known, to the point that people are falling over him with praise and worship. This is not something as evident in the later albums. Obviously Herge began to change his tact when it came to Cigars of the Pharaoh, and while the Tintin in America is not as intense as this, it is still portrayed in a similar way. Another difference is that Herge edited out all of the bad references to Negroes in Tintin in America, however it is so prevalent here that it is clearly not possible to do the same thing. The other criticism that comes up in this album is the treatment of animals, and it is not pretty. While Herge is being comical with his albums, it seems that animals are treated really badly in this particular one. Tintin goes on an elephant hunt and returns with the tusks. These days this is a very big no, no, but that is a recent development especially as it is becoming ever more clear that certain animals are in danger of becoming extinct (however Elephants are work horses in numerous Asian countries, so they are unlikely to suffer the same fate as their African cousins). While the event with the Boa Constrictor is rather amusing, having Snowy rip through its gut, and then trick the snake into eating itself is getting to the point of ludicrous. I think I might finish off saying a few things about the diamond trade. It is a very lucrative business but not necessarily illegal. Technically it is not illegal to mine with government permission, and it is not illegal to import or stockpile them. Well, it is if you are not members of the cartels, but as long as you don't rock the boat they don't care. The belief is that there are actually quite a lot of diamonds on Earth, more than actually justifies the price we pay for them. Some people I have spoken to suggest that if diamonds were not as expensive as they are then nobody would attach the same value to them, while others persist that they would. I probably can't say that they are as common as quartz (unlikely) but they are not as rare as they are made out to be. It is believed that the cartels mine the diamonds and then move them to Europe and America where they are stockpiled and locked up. Those that will be sold are cut and put on display, while the rest are locked up in secret warehouses. This issue is dealt with in a film called Blood Diamond. It is not that it is illegal to mine them, or take them out of Africa, but it is the treatment of the miners, the poor pay and working conditions, and the fact that the government does not get a kickback for the production of these diamonds. Any kickback received generally goes into the pockets of the officials. African friends have said that bribery is rife and that if you want things done then you have to grease somebody's palm. In a way I am still wondering how it is that these diamond smugglers were actually doing anything wrong, per se, but it was probably enough for Herge to write about it. While this story is very early Herge, and very, very politically incorrect (by our standards that is), there is still an indication of Herge's later brilliance and political commentary in this album to make us notice. It is a shame though that despite the glimpse of Herge's later brilliance, he had to undermine his credibility with such poor treatment of the African Negro. At least he realised his mistake later on and worked to prevent it from being published, at least in English. Still, it existed, and it was only a matter of time before somebody pulled it out of the bottom draw and released it to the English speaking world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kaung Myat Han

    A great improvement in terms of character drawings and graphics in 'Tintin in the Congo' since the first volume 'The Adventures of Tintin in the Land of the Soviets' but what disappointed me the most is the very apparent racism towards the African-Americans and cruel unjust treatment towards the animals(it shocked me when Tintin blew the rhinoceros up with a dynamite!). I heard the English language edition is banned in some countries and it's not regarded as part of the wonderful Tintin canon. O A great improvement in terms of character drawings and graphics in 'Tintin in the Congo' since the first volume 'The Adventures of Tintin in the Land of the Soviets' but what disappointed me the most is the very apparent racism towards the African-Americans and cruel unjust treatment towards the animals(it shocked me when Tintin blew the rhinoceros up with a dynamite!). I heard the English language edition is banned in some countries and it's not regarded as part of the wonderful Tintin canon. Of course, this is not a perfect comic book but Hergé sure had the chance to flex his creative muscles as afterwards from the first two volumes, the rest of the comic series are exciting, full of adventures and vivdly drawn. You can give the first two volumes a pass unless if you are a die-hard fan or unless you want to find out how the main character developed throught the different books. 'Tintin in the Congo', I might stress again, is horribly racist, pro-colonialist and simply portrays the natives as stupid and dumb even to the point they call Tintin's dog Snowy as 'Master Dog'. You don't want to see your kids reading this. Just give them other volumes like the third one I'm going to read now which is 'Tintin in America'.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Coenraad

    This Tintin adventure has become notorious because of the horribly stereotypical depiction of Africa. Everything about it indicates its cartoon nature: the ideology is outdated and shocking to modern readers, the action / violence easy and over very quickly with hardly any consequences, the links between episodes too tenuous, and most episodes deal either with encounters with African animals or the baddie who wants to bump Tintin off. Not an excellent example of Hergé's art - later adventures ha This Tintin adventure has become notorious because of the horribly stereotypical depiction of Africa. Everything about it indicates its cartoon nature: the ideology is outdated and shocking to modern readers, the action / violence easy and over very quickly with hardly any consequences, the links between episodes too tenuous, and most episodes deal either with encounters with African animals or the baddie who wants to bump Tintin off. Not an excellent example of Hergé's art - later adventures have more depth and authenticity. The English translation gives Snowy some wonderfully funny asides. The main reason one has to read this book is to see how much attitudes to people other than ourselves (whoever the 'our' may be) have changed. Hierdie vroeë Kuifie-avontuur is kru omdat die uitbeelding van Afrika op gruwelike stereotipes gebaseer is. Die rassisme en argelose doodmaak van diere, saam met die vlak, episodiese verhaal, maak dat hierdie boek nie 'n essensiële aflewering in die Kuifie-reeks is nie. Tog is dit op ideologiese vlak interessant - as 'n mens dit vanuit hierdie hoek benader, is die teks aandag werd.

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