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Star Trek. The Next Generation (72). Die Entführung Das Q Kontinuum 2

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The puckish super-being called Q has bedeviled Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the Starship Enterprise since their first encounter at Farpoint Station. But little was known of Q's enigmatic past or that of the transcendent plane where he sometimes dwells. Now Picard must discover Q's secrets -- for the sake of all that exists. While the Enterprise struggles to surv The puckish super-being called Q has bedeviled Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the Starship Enterprise since their first encounter at Farpoint Station. But little was known of Q's enigmatic past or that of the transcendent plane where he sometimes dwells. Now Picard must discover Q's secrets -- for the sake of all that exists. While the Enterprise struggles to survive an alien onslaught, Captain Picard has been kidnapped by Q and taken on an astounding journey back through time to that immeasurably distant moment when the Continuum faced its greatest threat. But far more is at stake than simply the mysteries of the past, for an ancient menace is stirring once more, endangering the future of the galaxy, and neither Q nor Starfleet may be able to stop it!


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The puckish super-being called Q has bedeviled Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the Starship Enterprise since their first encounter at Farpoint Station. But little was known of Q's enigmatic past or that of the transcendent plane where he sometimes dwells. Now Picard must discover Q's secrets -- for the sake of all that exists. While the Enterprise struggles to surv The puckish super-being called Q has bedeviled Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the Starship Enterprise since their first encounter at Farpoint Station. But little was known of Q's enigmatic past or that of the transcendent plane where he sometimes dwells. Now Picard must discover Q's secrets -- for the sake of all that exists. While the Enterprise struggles to survive an alien onslaught, Captain Picard has been kidnapped by Q and taken on an astounding journey back through time to that immeasurably distant moment when the Continuum faced its greatest threat. But far more is at stake than simply the mysteries of the past, for an ancient menace is stirring once more, endangering the future of the galaxy, and neither Q nor Starfleet may be able to stop it!

30 review for Star Trek. The Next Generation (72). Die Entführung Das Q Kontinuum 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    A continuation of the story featuring the enigmatic and insane Star Trek character, Q.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    And so on to the second the Q continuum trilogy - and it pretty much picks up the instance the first book left off. Now it is always tricky to speak about a book which is part of a series where the action is almost instantly picking up from the first volume. The reason is two fold = the first is that if you are reading these comments without having read the first it pretty much tells you how it would end since the next sentence in the book is the first in this. The other reason is that anything And so on to the second the Q continuum trilogy - and it pretty much picks up the instance the first book left off. Now it is always tricky to speak about a book which is part of a series where the action is almost instantly picking up from the first volume. The reason is two fold = the first is that if you are reading these comments without having read the first it pretty much tells you how it would end since the next sentence in the book is the first in this. The other reason is that anything that happens in this book has its premise created in the first so technically you would not need to explain it twice. I will admit this is also a bonus as so much can be written in this book without any length back story or explanations. Just as well as there are some huge references to previous star trek stories but from the original series and the next generation and I must admit they were deftly done - just enough weight to make you realise their importance but not too much that it was a contrite name drop to make sure you knew whose franchise you were reading. Anyway this book I must had a lot going on - but in the scheme of things pretty much left the enterprise where you found it - the question is what is the larger picture being played out and considering the names already referred to in this book where will the third and final book go?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Like the last installment, it is difficult to judge the story when it not yet complete. The action is at faster pace than the first volume, which is welcome, and the events that end with the destruction of the Tkon Empire were a lot of fun to read. Greg Cox does very well with his world-building for the Tkon, and the fact that they are so well fleshed-out makes the Empire's eventual fall that much more tragic. I'm excited to get to the conclusion of this story soon. Look for my review of part th Like the last installment, it is difficult to judge the story when it not yet complete. The action is at faster pace than the first volume, which is welcome, and the events that end with the destruction of the Tkon Empire were a lot of fun to read. Greg Cox does very well with his world-building for the Tkon, and the fact that they are so well fleshed-out makes the Empire's eventual fall that much more tragic. I'm excited to get to the conclusion of this story soon. Look for my review of part three in the near future! Full review: http://treklit.blogspot.com/2015/11/T...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Hayes

    You could read this installment without reading the previous, but the overall story certainly has a grander scale if you read the preceding book. The Enterprise-E is just outside the Great Barrier, buffeted by the energy of this galactic enigma and pummeled by the energy of the Calamarain who seek to destroy the ship for attempting to enter it. Jean-Luc Picard has been wisked away by Q to follow in his youthful steps after he released 0 from the Guardian on the Edge of Forever. Picard watches as You could read this installment without reading the previous, but the overall story certainly has a grander scale if you read the preceding book. The Enterprise-E is just outside the Great Barrier, buffeted by the energy of this galactic enigma and pummeled by the energy of the Calamarain who seek to destroy the ship for attempting to enter it. Jean-Luc Picard has been wisked away by Q to follow in his youthful steps after he released 0 from the Guardian on the Edge of Forever. Picard watches as 0 subjects the Tkon to a series of "tests" that don't appear be designed to examine anything about this species. The novel ends with 0's tests concluded and Q learning something about his newfound friend and his treacherous colleagues. If you've read the first book, you know exactly how the story will end in regard to the Tkon, but Cox makes it an absolutely marvelous and painful read as individuals try their best to stop the fighting. I was glued to those chapters because I was constantly wondering if they would be able to guess what was actually occurring to them. The ending is brutal and tragic. The large paragraph on Page 258 is simply explained through science, yet it the most heartbreaking thing I can recall reading. I'm also in awe how Cox can make Q sympathetic. What happens to his youthful self is horrible, yet the reader can see what is going on, while the "omnipotent" Q is clueless. It's a painful lesson and present day Q's comments to Picard barely maintain this sympathy. I love when writers can make the antagonists sympathetic, luring the reader, and possibly the characters, into complacency. One recurring character from the series has an idea that might save the Enterprise when all looks lost. I also appreciated this, because the character was (once again) not doing much to justify his presence, but Cox makes his idea integral for the crew's survival. I've never been a fan of this individual, but without him the crew might have been lost. A big shout out also to the pair of classic Trek villains that appears as 0's underlings. I've never been too fond of either character, thinking others in their episodes are much more interesting, but having them in action in this novel increases their strength in those later appearances. The book ends in a cliffhanger--how else could the second book close in a trilogy?--and I will definitely be reading the conclusion quickly. Cox certainly cements himself as one of Trek's better writers with this series.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Kordyban

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Superbeings that are sadistic, cruel and unfair are truly something that would/could be feared. At least the Q makes the 'tests' livable. Superbeings that are sadistic, cruel and unfair are truly something that would/could be feared. At least the Q makes the 'tests' livable.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Q-Zone, the second book in the Q Continuum trilogy, picks up in the midst of an unrelenting battle between the Enterprise (under the command of Riker) and the Calamarain, while Picard is held as an unwitting hostage-come-spectator to Q's checkered past. Fleeing the Calamarain, Riker takes the Enterprise into the Galactic Barrier in a move which may way well turn into a frying pan into the fire maneuver. Meanwhile, Picard bears witness to a genocide of epic proportions as Q reveals how he played a Q-Zone, the second book in the Q Continuum trilogy, picks up in the midst of an unrelenting battle between the Enterprise (under the command of Riker) and the Calamarain, while Picard is held as an unwitting hostage-come-spectator to Q's checkered past. Fleeing the Calamarain, Riker takes the Enterprise into the Galactic Barrier in a move which may way well turn into a frying pan into the fire maneuver. Meanwhile, Picard bears witness to a genocide of epic proportions as Q reveals how he played a role in the extermination of the ancient Tkon civilization, orchestrated by the malevolent 0. After spending the majority of Book 1 battling the Calamarain, Riker finally takes action after Barclay's suggestion that the Enterprise's shields could be augmented by the psyionic energy of the galactic barrier. Sure enough, the crew leave behind their gaseous adversaries, although the price they have to pay is not yet clear. I'm glad that Lem Faal's story is finally advanced here: his constant chafing against the crew had become tiresome, and pushed beyond all reasonable behaviour. Thankfully, we're informed that such behaviour is not entirely of his own making as the entity behind the barrier (0) has formed some psychic connections of his own. This turns Lem Faal into an even more tragic figure, devoid of any emotional connection to his two children and intent on seeing through his experiment no matter what the consequences. Quite how much of this is 0's influence, I'm not entirely sure - but his son seems to give the impression that Lem has never been a contender for the galaxy's best father. I was glad to see Female Q and Q Junior sidelined in Book 2, their presence became grating in the first book and the (already tense) situation on the Enterprise didn't need an extra element of complication thrown into the mix. Riker's command skills sometimes come across as lacking in certain critical scenes - his lack of authority when it comes to Lem Faal and ensuring the safety of the telepathic crewmembers felt somewhat out of character, as did his self doubt about losing another Enterprise after the D was lost in Star Trek Generations. Honorary mention must be given to Baeta Leyoro, the Enterprise's new security chief of Angosian supersoldier ("The Hunted") origin. Sadly, both in this book and the last, the character comes across as two-dimensionally trigger happy (especially in her reaction to Q and Barclay). Still, I'll be interested to see any effects of the psychic energies of the barrier which may or may not manifest themselves in her in Book 3. On to the primary plot: Picard's journey into Q's past. I enjoyed 0's summoning of his preternatural gang of thugs through the Guardian of Forever. While I feel the jury is still out on the inclusion of Gorgan (TOS's friendly angel from "And the Children Shall Lead", a less than stellar episode), I enjoyed the inclusion of the Beta XIIa entity, christened here as (*), and "The One", an alien who bears similarities to "God" from Star Trek V: The Final Frontier. Author Greg Cox clearly knows his canon well, and that's one of the main reasons why Q-Zone excels at weaving together established elements of the Star Trek universe into an interesting plot. Cox provides a believable backstory to the Calamarain, and justifies their hatred of Q we see in "Deja Q". It was harrowing to see 0's casual brutality in condensing the lifeforms down into an icy dustball, and Q's reaction was pitched well. Yet in reality this is only the prelude to the main event (as we are constantly reminded by modern-day Q)... The Tkon empire take center stage as 0 and Q's playthings, as 0 coaches Q in the joys of tormenting lesser lifeforms. Here clearly lies the origin of Q's love of "testing" species, and Cox establishes a very believable backstory for our favourite omnipotent TNG guest star in a plot which finally sheds light on the reasons behind Q's modus operandi. In a series of chapters which spans periods of time in the decades leading up to the annihilation of the Tkon empire, 0, Gorgan, (*) and The One take turns in wreaking havoc and fomenting civil war across the multiple worlds which constitute the Tkon empire's home solar system. Viewers who remember TNG's "The Last Outpost" already know how things end for the Tkon Empire, but I thought Cox's plot was especially convincing in tying together so many high-concept throwaway lines in that episode. While the intervention of the superbeings in Tkon history became gradually more deadly, this made 0's final act no less harrowing. The way in which 0 snuffs out an entire civilization with such casual disregard for life shocked me even though I knew it was coming. Young Q's reaction was fascinating to see, as his "limits" are finally laid down: this is wrong, and even though he is outnumbered and powerless to stop it, a line has been drawn in the sand placing Q and 0 on opposite sides. It's clear that the trilogy is maneuvering towards the eventual reveal and potential release of an imprisoned 0, so I'm looking forward to diving into the final book to see how things end. An improvement on Book 1, and very enjoyable! Four stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    The 2nd in the Q Continuum trilogy of books, this Star Trek - The Next Generation novel is dripping with continuity nods for fans of the Star Trek movies and television series. The book moves at a slower pace than the first installment, concentrating on Picard and Q's observation of 0's entrance to their multiverse and his tampering with the Tkon empire. We're also given a look at the Enterprise E as it tries to survive a confrontation at the edge of the Galactic Barrier. As with the first book The 2nd in the Q Continuum trilogy of books, this Star Trek - The Next Generation novel is dripping with continuity nods for fans of the Star Trek movies and television series. The book moves at a slower pace than the first installment, concentrating on Picard and Q's observation of 0's entrance to their multiverse and his tampering with the Tkon empire. We're also given a look at the Enterprise E as it tries to survive a confrontation at the edge of the Galactic Barrier. As with the first book in this trilogy, as a Trek geek I devoured this and thoroughly enjoyed. I'm looking forward to reading the third and final part of this awesome Q storyline!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter Rydén

    Storyn blir ännu mer rörig (fast det är inte fel – för Q är ju minst sagt rörig när han skall berätta något då han inte tänker eller agerar linjärt...) och komplex. Det är en drivande historia som tvingas vidare hela tiden och man känner verkligen kampen mot klockan. Som en mellanbok normalt sett är, är även denna något sämre än den första boken, men det är inget markant och boken behövs självklart som en del i trilogin.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    I quit. I forced myself through book one and was hoping for better things but this series is terrible. This guy's writing is awful and his ideas are stupid. You can't get through one chapter without him referencing some episode or moment in previous Trek. It's all uninspired garbage and I hate it. I like reading Star Trek and these books have killed that for me for a bit. Thanks Greg Cox, your bland fan fiction can go somewhere else. I quit. I forced myself through book one and was hoping for better things but this series is terrible. This guy's writing is awful and his ideas are stupid. You can't get through one chapter without him referencing some episode or moment in previous Trek. It's all uninspired garbage and I hate it. I like reading Star Trek and these books have killed that for me for a bit. Thanks Greg Cox, your bland fan fiction can go somewhere else.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Russell Horton

    It is said that the weak part in a trilogy is usually the second part, however, not so in this case. Not much interlude and a bit more action casting more light of the character of Q as well. Needless to say that this series will possibly change your view on him. Well done with an ending leaving the reader hopefully wanting more.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andy Parkes

    Not as good as the first, felt very much like it's purpose was to set everything up for the final book. Enjoyable still Looking forward to the last one Not as good as the first, felt very much like it's purpose was to set everything up for the final book. Enjoyable still Looking forward to the last one

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Smith

    The Tkon empire history, interesting.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Richard Sampson

    Another very interesting read, delving into the background of Q

  14. 5 out of 5

    Conan Tigard

    Q-Zone takes place on a new Enterprise-E, so must occur just after the second movie, First Contact, since that is when the new ship is introduced. The story focuses on two divergent storylines: 1) Q showing Picard bits and pieces of Q's own past, and 2) Riker and the Enterprise, after failing in their attempt at breaching the Great Galactic Barrier, must survive the attack of the Calamarain. Where the first book in this trilogy moved along rather slowly, this one picks up the pace a little. But Q-Zone takes place on a new Enterprise-E, so must occur just after the second movie, First Contact, since that is when the new ship is introduced. The story focuses on two divergent storylines: 1) Q showing Picard bits and pieces of Q's own past, and 2) Riker and the Enterprise, after failing in their attempt at breaching the Great Galactic Barrier, must survive the attack of the Calamarain. Where the first book in this trilogy moved along rather slowly, this one picks up the pace a little. But, still, I was a little disappointed in the later part of the story as it takes place all in the Tkon Empire. I wanted more about the Star Trek crew. Yes, I understand that this part of the story was necessary to show how ruthless 0 and his band of executioners are, but I still wanted more of the character I know and love. I can't help that. Greg Cox does an excellent job with the characterization and it is interesting to learn about Q in his youth and to see that he used to have morals. Why did Q change? I can't answer that yet. Hopefully that will be in Q-Strike, the last book of this trilogy. Overall, Q-Zone is a better book than Q-Space, and a good continuance to a trilogy. Like with any Star Trek book, if you are a Star Trek Next Generation fan, and especially a Q fan, you shouldn't miss this one. I rated this book a 7 out of 10.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    Here we have a premise with as much potential as any novel can have, and it's left largely unused. "Q-Zone" centeres around Q's past, showing us Q's and Picard's journey through space and time. Unfortunately we don't get to witness the ultimate, surreal, fantastic Q-adventure, like the later released "IQ" by Peter David and John DeLancie, but insted we are offered tons of tedious and irrelevant scenes that are structured badly. In the end the novel isn't bad in any way. It just could have been so Here we have a premise with as much potential as any novel can have, and it's left largely unused. "Q-Zone" centeres around Q's past, showing us Q's and Picard's journey through space and time. Unfortunately we don't get to witness the ultimate, surreal, fantastic Q-adventure, like the later released "IQ" by Peter David and John DeLancie, but insted we are offered tons of tedious and irrelevant scenes that are structured badly. In the end the novel isn't bad in any way. It just could have been so much more.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Scarlett Sims

    Alright, so this is the second book in this trilogy. Picard has been kidnapped by Q, leaving the Enterprise-E with Riker in command to fight off the Calamarain. If that sentence didn't make sense to you, there's no sense in picking up this book. Anyway, the cool thing this trilogy does is give us a peek into the life of young Q, showing the mistakes he made and giving some clues as to why he is so.... Q-y. Alright, so this is the second book in this trilogy. Picard has been kidnapped by Q, leaving the Enterprise-E with Riker in command to fight off the Calamarain. If that sentence didn't make sense to you, there's no sense in picking up this book. Anyway, the cool thing this trilogy does is give us a peek into the life of young Q, showing the mistakes he made and giving some clues as to why he is so.... Q-y.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Min

    I lovely romp through the history of Q. After a nice foundation in the first of the trilogy, this one gets to the meat of the matter. What an interesting life it has been for Q. A wonderful blend of the many layers in the past, with the present, and a smattering of how it just may transform the future. I know Q was interesting but, this is intriguing indeed. A taste of the 4 horsemen and you can't go wrong, eh? I lovely romp through the history of Q. After a nice foundation in the first of the trilogy, this one gets to the meat of the matter. What an interesting life it has been for Q. A wonderful blend of the many layers in the past, with the present, and a smattering of how it just may transform the future. I know Q was interesting but, this is intriguing indeed. A taste of the 4 horsemen and you can't go wrong, eh?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Weavre

    Just adding a few more Star Trek novels I found while working in the shed, so they're in my list here; that way, I can easily see which ones we don't have and bookmooch only titles we're missing. But to be honest, I don't remember any of these stories particularly well, and will have to post an actual review when and if I get around to re-reading them in the future. Just adding a few more Star Trek novels I found while working in the shed, so they're in my list here; that way, I can easily see which ones we don't have and bookmooch only titles we're missing. But to be honest, I don't remember any of these stories particularly well, and will have to post an actual review when and if I get around to re-reading them in the future.

  19. 5 out of 5

    K

    Okay second book of the trilogy. It primarily focused on the backstory between Q and 0. It was not as exciting as the first book, so my hopes are it was necessary filler to make the third book make more sense. I almost get the feeling that perhaps the publisher forced the author to stretch the book into three separate books (each of the three books is almost exactly 270 pages). 3.25/5

  20. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This immediately follows on QSpace. Q starts to show Picard his history. Again another fun read. But it is not really a seperate book, it just feels like the author wrote too many pages for hs story so that they had to seperate it into different books. Again you need the next in the series to finish the story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    This was okay. It carried the story forward, and I still want to see what happens (though I figured out the ending before I'd finished book 1). But I think most of what happens in this book could have been incorporated into the first book without significantly lengthening it. This was okay. It carried the story forward, and I still want to see what happens (though I figured out the ending before I'd finished book 1). But I think most of what happens in this book could have been incorporated into the first book without significantly lengthening it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alec

    Gave up on this one 2/3 of the way through and I will not be reading the 3rd in the trilogy. For a storyline about one of my favourite recurring characters, I was bored to death.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Todd R

    Worse than the first. Half of the book is filler - could have been 100 pages in total.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Isiah

    See my review of the first book of this trilogy.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Certainly not the Q-Continuum I imagined.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Spectacular!!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    I've read too many Star Trek book's and too long ago to give a valid comment other than that I liked it or even loved it. The book is in great condition. I've read too many Star Trek book's and too long ago to give a valid comment other than that I liked it or even loved it. The book is in great condition.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carl Bussema

    See review for Q-Space.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Plume

    This trilogy is one of Trek's best written masterpieces, thanks to Greg Cox. This trilogy is one of Trek's best written masterpieces, thanks to Greg Cox.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Keef

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