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Pilots, Man Your Planes!: The History of Naval Aviation

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This is the complete history of Naval Aviation and of the men and women who fought for it from its obscure beginnings in 1910 through the Persian Gulf War and on to the present. Morrison paints a fascinating retrospective of the successes and failures of a division of the military that has been immersed in politics and bureaucracy from its beginnings. He describes the conf This is the complete history of Naval Aviation and of the men and women who fought for it from its obscure beginnings in 1910 through the Persian Gulf War and on to the present. Morrison paints a fascinating retrospective of the successes and failures of a division of the military that has been immersed in politics and bureaucracy from its beginnings. He describes the conflicts between Navy battleship diehards and the young turks who made up the Navy's early aviation branch and affected the course of tomorrow's aviation technology.


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This is the complete history of Naval Aviation and of the men and women who fought for it from its obscure beginnings in 1910 through the Persian Gulf War and on to the present. Morrison paints a fascinating retrospective of the successes and failures of a division of the military that has been immersed in politics and bureaucracy from its beginnings. He describes the conf This is the complete history of Naval Aviation and of the men and women who fought for it from its obscure beginnings in 1910 through the Persian Gulf War and on to the present. Morrison paints a fascinating retrospective of the successes and failures of a division of the military that has been immersed in politics and bureaucracy from its beginnings. He describes the conflicts between Navy battleship diehards and the young turks who made up the Navy's early aviation branch and affected the course of tomorrow's aviation technology.

10 review for Pilots, Man Your Planes!: The History of Naval Aviation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ted

    This book would have been deserving another star if not for a number of factual errors in Part III: World War II. In the bombing of the light carrier PRINCETON (CVL-23) on 24 October 1944 the author states that just when it appeared that fires were coming under control "a tremendous explosion killed many of the carrier's men as well as 'some' on rescue ships alongside." Casualties on the carrier were actually relatively light considering the intensity of her fires and subsequent explosion; only This book would have been deserving another star if not for a number of factual errors in Part III: World War II. In the bombing of the light carrier PRINCETON (CVL-23) on 24 October 1944 the author states that just when it appeared that fires were coming under control "a tremendous explosion killed many of the carrier's men as well as 'some' on rescue ships alongside." Casualties on the carrier were actually relatively light considering the intensity of her fires and subsequent explosion; only 108 men were lost, while 1,361 crewmen were rescued before the vessel sank. More than 90 percent of her complement would survive the ordeal. The light cruiser BIRMINGHAM (CL-62) was aside the PRINCETON assisting in fire fighting and survival activities when flames touched off the carriers' after magazines. The cataclysmic explosion blew off the carriers’ stern and much of the aft flight deck. The BIRMINGHAM was raked from stem to stern with steel plate fragments, wooden planking, and all manner of debris. Over half of the light cruisers’ crew became casualties since virtually everyone on the starboard side (facing the carrier) was killed or wounded. The blast killed 233 men and seriously wounded 211, with another 215 suffering minor wounds. The Commanding Officer and Executive Officer were among the wounded. The senior medical officer was among those killed. The cruiser's deck literally ran with blood and her surviving crew threw sand on the deck to provide a firm footing amidst the carnage. While 790 sailors of Task Force 38 lost their lives in Typhoon Cobra ("Halsey's" Typhoon) there was no "large loss of life" during a second typhoon (Typhoon"Connie", some accounts call it "Viper") on 05 June 1945. Six lives were lost in this typhoon, not a large loss of life.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bo

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jan

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Reid

  5. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  6. 5 out of 5

    Greg Weller

  7. 5 out of 5

    Phil Webb

  8. 5 out of 5

    Roger

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth A.

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