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The Mammoth Book Of Special Forces Training: Physical and Mental Secrets of Elite Military Units (Mammoth Books)

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In this encyclopedic book, Lewis provides insights into the origins, training, tactics, weapons and achievements of special forces and special mission units throughout the world, focusing particularly on US and UK forces. He also looks at the codes that that bind the members of these elite units together. He reveals training secrets in everything from wilderness survival t In this encyclopedic book, Lewis provides insights into the origins, training, tactics, weapons and achievements of special forces and special mission units throughout the world, focusing particularly on US and UK forces. He also looks at the codes that that bind the members of these elite units together. He reveals training secrets in everything from wilderness survival to hand-to-hand combat. In doing so, he draws extensively on biographies, autobiographies, training manuals, interviews and press coverage of key operations. The elite forces covered include: The British Army’s Special Air Service (SAS), established in 1950, which has served as a model for the special forces of many countries. Its counter-terrorist wing famously took part in the hostage rescue during the siege of the Iranian Embassy in London in 1980. The Parachute Regiment, the airborne infantry element of 16 Air Assault Brigade, which spearheads the British Army’s rapid intervention capability. It is closely linked to United Kingdom Special Forces. The US Navy’s SEALS (Sea, Air, Land Teams), trained to conduct special operations in any environment, but uniquely specialised and equipped to operate from and in the sea. Together with speedboat-operating Naval Special Warfare Combatant-Craft Crewmen, they form the operational arm of the Naval Special Warfare community, the Navy component of the US Special Operations Command. Their special operations include: neutralizing enemy forces; reconnaissance; counter-terrorism (famously in the killing of Osama bin Laden); and training allies. The US Army’s Delta Force: The Special Mission Unit, 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta (1st SFOD-D), known simply as Delta Force, the Army component of Joint Special Operations Command. Its role is counter-terrorism, direct action and national intervention operations, though it has the capability to conduct many different kinds of clandestine missions, including hostage rescues and raids. The US Army Rangers, a light infantry combat formation under the US Army Special Operation Command. The Green Berets – motto: ‘to free the oppressed’ – trained in languages, culture, diplomacy, psychological warfare and disinformation. Russia’s Spetsnaz, whose crack anti-terrorist commandos ended the Moscow theatre siege, and who have a reputation for being among the world’s toughest and most ruthless soldiers. Spetsnaz units saw extensive action in Afghanistan and Chechnya, often operating far behind enemy lines. Israeli Special Forces, especially Shayetet 13 (Flotilla 13), whose motto, in common with the rest of the Israeli military, is ‘Never again’, a reference to the Holocaust. They are particularly adept at the specifically Israeli martial art Krav Maga, which they dub ‘Jew-jitsu’.


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In this encyclopedic book, Lewis provides insights into the origins, training, tactics, weapons and achievements of special forces and special mission units throughout the world, focusing particularly on US and UK forces. He also looks at the codes that that bind the members of these elite units together. He reveals training secrets in everything from wilderness survival t In this encyclopedic book, Lewis provides insights into the origins, training, tactics, weapons and achievements of special forces and special mission units throughout the world, focusing particularly on US and UK forces. He also looks at the codes that that bind the members of these elite units together. He reveals training secrets in everything from wilderness survival to hand-to-hand combat. In doing so, he draws extensively on biographies, autobiographies, training manuals, interviews and press coverage of key operations. The elite forces covered include: The British Army’s Special Air Service (SAS), established in 1950, which has served as a model for the special forces of many countries. Its counter-terrorist wing famously took part in the hostage rescue during the siege of the Iranian Embassy in London in 1980. The Parachute Regiment, the airborne infantry element of 16 Air Assault Brigade, which spearheads the British Army’s rapid intervention capability. It is closely linked to United Kingdom Special Forces. The US Navy’s SEALS (Sea, Air, Land Teams), trained to conduct special operations in any environment, but uniquely specialised and equipped to operate from and in the sea. Together with speedboat-operating Naval Special Warfare Combatant-Craft Crewmen, they form the operational arm of the Naval Special Warfare community, the Navy component of the US Special Operations Command. Their special operations include: neutralizing enemy forces; reconnaissance; counter-terrorism (famously in the killing of Osama bin Laden); and training allies. The US Army’s Delta Force: The Special Mission Unit, 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta (1st SFOD-D), known simply as Delta Force, the Army component of Joint Special Operations Command. Its role is counter-terrorism, direct action and national intervention operations, though it has the capability to conduct many different kinds of clandestine missions, including hostage rescues and raids. The US Army Rangers, a light infantry combat formation under the US Army Special Operation Command. The Green Berets – motto: ‘to free the oppressed’ – trained in languages, culture, diplomacy, psychological warfare and disinformation. Russia’s Spetsnaz, whose crack anti-terrorist commandos ended the Moscow theatre siege, and who have a reputation for being among the world’s toughest and most ruthless soldiers. Spetsnaz units saw extensive action in Afghanistan and Chechnya, often operating far behind enemy lines. Israeli Special Forces, especially Shayetet 13 (Flotilla 13), whose motto, in common with the rest of the Israeli military, is ‘Never again’, a reference to the Holocaust. They are particularly adept at the specifically Israeli martial art Krav Maga, which they dub ‘Jew-jitsu’.

49 review for The Mammoth Book Of Special Forces Training: Physical and Mental Secrets of Elite Military Units (Mammoth Books)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Igor Ljubuncic

    I say 2.5 stars, rounded up to 3. This book wasn't what I expected. At all. The cover says it reviews and focuses on the operations, tactics, technology and training of various special forces around the globe, including the SAS, Delta Force, US Navy SEALs, Israeli Sayeret Matkal, Russian Spetsnaz, and alike. Sounds good, only this is not what happens. The first 50 pages do give you a brief overview of several major special forces - with a strong focus on the SAS and to a lesser extent the SBS, a br I say 2.5 stars, rounded up to 3. This book wasn't what I expected. At all. The cover says it reviews and focuses on the operations, tactics, technology and training of various special forces around the globe, including the SAS, Delta Force, US Navy SEALs, Israeli Sayeret Matkal, Russian Spetsnaz, and alike. Sounds good, only this is not what happens. The first 50 pages do give you a brief overview of several major special forces - with a strong focus on the SAS and to a lesser extent the SBS, a brief mention of the Green Berets, Sayeret Matkal, and a few pages on the Navy SEALs, the last two which sound like the most interesting of the bunch. Then, the last 50 pages mention some of the world's other SF units, with hardly a page dedicated to each, almost nothing on the German and French, and the still more on the SAS. In between, it's one huge survival manual that has little to do with special forces. It's all around evasion & escape training, how to survive in the wild in cold, temperate and jungle climates, how to build shelter, hunt and identify plants. Some of it is okay, some of it quite boring. There are a lot of typos, including a paragraph written twice just four lines apart, a paragraph that ends mid-sentence followed by three empty lines, and a few see xxx references that haven't been completed. In one place, the author even mentions the cold winds from the USSR! And the book was written in 2015. The manual is primarily around British Army and how they do things, and it's hardly international at all (like the fact you can't hunt birds or carry lock picks in the UK, what). I was expecting a more international telling - more of the various missions, more on the weapons, more on the French, German and Russian forces, more on the Israeli - or even the US forces. Instead, it's a heavily UK-oriented book, it gives too much attention to the survival-in-the-nature stuff and only superficially covers the action details that make the special forces interesting. Average all in all. Can be an okay read, but it's tedious and scant on the "hot stuff" detail. Igor

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Parker

    “When all's said and done, the brutal business of war comes in two forms.. Then there is the shadowy mission of the irregular, small-scale unit, with its unorthodox tactics and its unusual weapons. The Special Forces” (Lewis 1). This book gives detailed descriptions to the different units of the Special Forces. Learn about the U.S. Army’s Green Berets or The U.S. Navy Seals. The book teaches the readers survival techniques. Anything from building a fire, to making a bow and arrows. As well as, h “When all's said and done, the brutal business of war comes in two forms.. Then there is the shadowy mission of the irregular, small-scale unit, with its unorthodox tactics and its unusual weapons. The Special Forces” (Lewis 1). This book gives detailed descriptions to the different units of the Special Forces. Learn about the U.S. Army’s Green Berets or The U.S. Navy Seals. The book teaches the readers survival techniques. Anything from building a fire, to making a bow and arrows. As well as, how to survive the harsh conditions of the Jungle, Desert, and Arctic. Gives you an insight to the missions Special Forces Soldiers must tackle. Capture and Escape to Covert Operations. As a future soldier I decided to read this book to give me some useful tips and techniques. I would definitely recommend this book, Its knowledge is very intriguing and helpful.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Carlson

    Historian and Writer Jon E. Lewis offers a detailed, well written account of what it takes to be one of the elite soldiers of special forces. It seems amazing to me we have any special forces units given what's required both mentally and physically. It illustrates how strong the human spirit is and anything is possible. This physically fit elite soldier is a great swimmer, mentally tough, can survive anything, expert in capture, evasion and escape, proficient in navigation, combat, medical, weap Historian and Writer Jon E. Lewis offers a detailed, well written account of what it takes to be one of the elite soldiers of special forces. It seems amazing to me we have any special forces units given what's required both mentally and physically. It illustrates how strong the human spirit is and anything is possible. This physically fit elite soldier is a great swimmer, mentally tough, can survive anything, expert in capture, evasion and escape, proficient in navigation, combat, medical, weapons and at the end of the day can still have a sense of humor. Upon reading this book you will have an appreciation and respect for Special Forces and why our government relies on their expertise to handle classified situations on a regular basis. Over 500 pages complete with drawings, appendix of world wide special forces, sources, bibliography and acknowledgements.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Doug Sanders

    The book describes the history of special forces (Green Beret, SAS, SEALs and Israel). It's interesting but very academic. The back half of the book is devoted to training and preparation for those interested in joining SF. The next section is written like a manual. On whole it's ok. The book describes the history of special forces (Green Beret, SAS, SEALs and Israel). It's interesting but very academic. The back half of the book is devoted to training and preparation for those interested in joining SF. The next section is written like a manual. On whole it's ok.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Shapter

    A companion read to supplement more detailed books on this subject. By no means a go-to reference. Could very much do with an edit.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Casey

    Not what I was expecting at all. Unclear if it's been updated at all recently, repetitive and hard to follow. Not what I was expecting at all. Unclear if it's been updated at all recently, repetitive and hard to follow.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nandu

    Its really an excellent work.selection , training , survival skills , battle skills everything was explained in this book.If you are looking to join the special forces you must read it .

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lee Whitehouse

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brad Beattie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Harris

  11. 5 out of 5

    J

  12. 5 out of 5

    fiona Lafferty

  13. 4 out of 5

    J.J

  14. 5 out of 5

    Peter Blockley

  15. 4 out of 5

    Johnathan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

  17. 5 out of 5

    Adonis

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris Welfare

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeffery Hickman

  20. 5 out of 5

    Manu Rens

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  22. 5 out of 5

    James Morenz

  23. 4 out of 5

    Maggie'may Reinders

  24. 5 out of 5

    Toby

  25. 4 out of 5

    Antonio

  26. 4 out of 5

    J.J

  27. 4 out of 5

    J.J

  28. 4 out of 5

    J

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tracy (A Good Novel)

  30. 5 out of 5

    14

  31. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

  32. 4 out of 5

    Michael Shulman

  33. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Kay

  34. 5 out of 5

    James

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  36. 5 out of 5

    Camilla Mason

  37. 5 out of 5

    Grant Tillotson

  38. 4 out of 5

    Robb Goodwin

  39. 4 out of 5

    Matt Fiskum

  40. 5 out of 5

    Fredrick

  41. 5 out of 5

    Larkin Ellul

  42. 5 out of 5

    Shagun Thakur

  43. 5 out of 5

    Janice

  44. 5 out of 5

    Mark Glaeser

  45. 4 out of 5

    Slavka Tcholakova

  46. 5 out of 5

    Nate Baker

  47. 4 out of 5

    Raymond

  48. 4 out of 5

    Costi

  49. 4 out of 5

    Robert

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