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The Sleeping Beauty and Other Tales

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The book includes five famous tales by Charles Perrault illustrated by Walter Crane (50 illustrations): Little Red Riding Hood; The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots; Blue Beard; The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods; and Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper. Walter Crane was a prominent book illustrator of the 19th century. In cooperation with Edmund Evans, he designed picture b The book includes five famous tales by Charles Perrault illustrated by Walter Crane (50 illustrations): Little Red Riding Hood; The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots; Blue Beard; The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods; and Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper. Walter Crane was a prominent book illustrator of the 19th century. In cooperation with Edmund Evans, he designed picture books printed in colour, which became the most popular children’s books at the time thanks to their high level of craftsmanship and low price. Crane’s style shows the influence of the art of the Renaissance and Japanese prints (ukiyo-e). He designed his books according to the belief that “children, like the ancient Egyptians, appear to see most things in profile and like definite statements in design. They prefer well-defined forms and bright, frank colour. They don’t want to bother about three dimensions. They can accept symbolic representations. They themselves employ drawing ... as a kind of picture-writing and eagerly follow a pictured story.” Crane’s work set the standards of taste in the Victorian children’s book industry and earned him a reputation as ‘the father of the illustrated children’s book’. Optimized for Kindle Fire HD.


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The book includes five famous tales by Charles Perrault illustrated by Walter Crane (50 illustrations): Little Red Riding Hood; The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots; Blue Beard; The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods; and Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper. Walter Crane was a prominent book illustrator of the 19th century. In cooperation with Edmund Evans, he designed picture b The book includes five famous tales by Charles Perrault illustrated by Walter Crane (50 illustrations): Little Red Riding Hood; The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots; Blue Beard; The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods; and Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper. Walter Crane was a prominent book illustrator of the 19th century. In cooperation with Edmund Evans, he designed picture books printed in colour, which became the most popular children’s books at the time thanks to their high level of craftsmanship and low price. Crane’s style shows the influence of the art of the Renaissance and Japanese prints (ukiyo-e). He designed his books according to the belief that “children, like the ancient Egyptians, appear to see most things in profile and like definite statements in design. They prefer well-defined forms and bright, frank colour. They don’t want to bother about three dimensions. They can accept symbolic representations. They themselves employ drawing ... as a kind of picture-writing and eagerly follow a pictured story.” Crane’s work set the standards of taste in the Victorian children’s book industry and earned him a reputation as ‘the father of the illustrated children’s book’. Optimized for Kindle Fire HD.

30 review for The Sleeping Beauty and Other Tales

  1. 4 out of 5

    Radwa

    Another "Sleeping Beauty" retelling, and despite sharing some common events, I like this way better than Giambattista Basile's version "Sun, Moon, Talia." This shows the basic story we know from Disney's movie (except there's no Maleficent, instead there's an evil mother-in-law), but the difference is that it goes beyond the movie, and what happens in later year with some weird twists. It's not so gory and creepy, just your basic fairy tale, and I liked it. Another "Sleeping Beauty" retelling, and despite sharing some common events, I like this way better than Giambattista Basile's version "Sun, Moon, Talia." This shows the basic story we know from Disney's movie (except there's no Maleficent, instead there's an evil mother-in-law), but the difference is that it goes beyond the movie, and what happens in later year with some weird twists. It's not so gory and creepy, just your basic fairy tale, and I liked it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sidharth Vardhan

    Read it for Christmas times. Although, written much before Grimm bros version (who borrowed a lot from Perrault), they are much better written here. The only problem is morals - why, why would someone feed moral tales to children?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marquise

    Edition with illustrations by Rackham. Wish there'd been colour illustrations, too, and not just silhouette and black & white drawings. Edition with illustrations by Rackham. Wish there'd been colour illustrations, too, and not just silhouette and black & white drawings.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erin Greene

    I liked this, in the sense that it was interesting, finding that an evil ogress, and mother of the prince is in fact the villain, and the old fairy (named Maleficent by Disney), is but a small nameless blip in the story. Otherwise, the story is not as well-written as I had hoped, and appears to be trying to teach a moral that falls completely flat.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Ibberson

    This book contains Charles Perrault's classic fairy tale of Sleeping Beauty. In this classic/original version, King Stefan and the Queen wish for a child. When at last they finally get their wish, they name their daughter, Aurora. When they have a feast to celebrate her birth, the three fairy godmothers start to bless Aurora. Fairy godmother Flora gives her the gift of beauty, Fairy godmother Fauna gives her the gift of song, and Fairy godmother Merryweather starts to give her a gift but Malefic This book contains Charles Perrault's classic fairy tale of Sleeping Beauty. In this classic/original version, King Stefan and the Queen wish for a child. When at last they finally get their wish, they name their daughter, Aurora. When they have a feast to celebrate her birth, the three fairy godmothers start to bless Aurora. Fairy godmother Flora gives her the gift of beauty, Fairy godmother Fauna gives her the gift of song, and Fairy godmother Merryweather starts to give her a gift but Maleficent the evil witch shows up and casts a spell that on Aurora's 16th birthday, she will prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel and die. Merryweather uses her gift to Aurora to change the spell by making it so that instead of dying, Aurora will fall into a deep sleep and will only be awakened by a kiss from her true love. Aurora's parents send her to stay with the fairies to try to keep her away from Maleficent. While with them she meets Prince Phillip but does not know he is the Prince. The fairies tell her that she must return home to the castle as she was promised to the Prince. When she returns, Maleficent shows up and lures her into a room where she pricks her finger on a spinning wheel and falls into a deep sleep. The fairies decide to cast a spell over the entire kingdom so the King and Queen won't know that Aurora has been put under the spell of Maleficent. They give Prince Phillip the shield of virtue and the sword of truth to rescue Aurora. He uses these to battle Maleficent when she turns herself into a dragon. Phillip races to Aurora and kisses Aurora and she wakes up. The rest of the kingdom also rises from their slumber. Then Prince Phillip and Princess Aurora get married and live happily ever after. This is the classic tale of good versus evil where the damsel in distress is rescued by the valiant prince and everyone lives happily ever after. It is a familiar theme that children will identify with as it has been passed down over the ages since it was first created long, long ago.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    I have never loved that fairy tale, I couldn't find any morals, I mean, sleeping for 100 years, Ok, we can deal with that, but falling in love with the princess before even meeting her or seeing what she looks like? And a queen mother who's an ogress and who's planning to eat your family? Come on! And asking the first guy you see when you wake up, "are you my prince?" while you should be frightened to death? :D are you kidding me?! Anyway, I had fun reading the book with some new surprises that I I have never loved that fairy tale, I couldn't find any morals, I mean, sleeping for 100 years, Ok, we can deal with that, but falling in love with the princess before even meeting her or seeing what she looks like? And a queen mother who's an ogress and who's planning to eat your family? Come on! And asking the first guy you see when you wake up, "are you my prince?" while you should be frightened to death? :D are you kidding me?! Anyway, I had fun reading the book with some new surprises that I've completely forgotten about :D

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stéphanie

    Many a girl has waited long For a husband brave or strong; But I'm sure I never met Any sort of woman yet Who could wait a hundred years, Free from fretting, free from fears. Now, our story seems to show That a century or so, Late or early, matters not; True love comes by fairy-lot. Some old folk will even say It grows better by delay. Yet this good advice, I fear, Helps us neither there nor here. Though philosophers may prate How much wiser 'tis to wait, Maids will be a sighing still -- Young blood must when yo Many a girl has waited long For a husband brave or strong; But I'm sure I never met Any sort of woman yet Who could wait a hundred years, Free from fretting, free from fears. Now, our story seems to show That a century or so, Late or early, matters not; True love comes by fairy-lot. Some old folk will even say It grows better by delay. Yet this good advice, I fear, Helps us neither there nor here. Though philosophers may prate How much wiser 'tis to wait, Maids will be a sighing still -- Young blood must when young blood will!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Binibining `E (of The Ugly Writers)

    This one is yet another version of the classic sleeping beauty, this has some old ogre known as the mother in law who wants to eat her grandchildren but was in a total failure little did she know aha it'll bite her ass in the end. Not so creepy like the one ive read before this. This one is yet another version of the classic sleeping beauty, this has some old ogre known as the mother in law who wants to eat her grandchildren but was in a total failure little did she know aha it'll bite her ass in the end. Not so creepy like the one ive read before this.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anna Serra i Vidal

    For a bookclub reading the original stories of the #Disney classical fairy tales and Sleeping Beauty by Charles Perrault is kind of gross. From the rape scene when the Princess is still asleep to the ogress Queen who wants to eat not only her grandchildren, but also the Princess.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Verity

    I've come to the conclusion that fairytales aren't my thing outside of Disney films. I've come to the conclusion that fairytales aren't my thing outside of Disney films.

  11. 5 out of 5

    ebony Harris

    Nice read,loved it loved the style difference from American fairytales. Its an interesting and 'chaotic neutral' take on the classic story and I absolutely adored it...maybe more than the American version 🤷🏿‍♀️. Nice read,loved it loved the style difference from American fairytales. Its an interesting and 'chaotic neutral' take on the classic story and I absolutely adored it...maybe more than the American version 🤷🏿‍♀️.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marianna Defendini Torres

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read this for a class. I think it was just another princess story. The only thing I found rather more interesting than the usual princess archetype stories is that in this one, the mother-in-law was the evil one. Other than that... well... just a good short story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Scott Delgado

    An ogre mother-in-law that wants to eat your whole family? Nice!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Salt

    Read for uni📚

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cristina

    Fantastic edition but stories are heavily edited.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Forked Radish

    Mediocre, but better than Disney's $6 million (1955) abomination. Mediocre, but better than Disney's $6 million (1955) abomination.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Reeves

    Great telling of a classic fairy tale. I think it's more true to the original fairy tale without the prevalent Disney-fication. Great telling of a classic fairy tale. I think it's more true to the original fairy tale without the prevalent Disney-fication.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Martyna

    I admit that I have read several versions of this wonderful fairy tale about the power of love and hate. Because it is the hatred of one of those offended fairies that caused the princess and the entire court to fell asleep for a hundred years. Only a kiss of true love will soothe the broken nerves, acts like the most effective painkiller, chase away bad thoughts and wake up from a magical coma. And then, as it is in fairy tales, there was a great joy, the princess married the prince and they liv I admit that I have read several versions of this wonderful fairy tale about the power of love and hate. Because it is the hatred of one of those offended fairies that caused the princess and the entire court to fell asleep for a hundred years. Only a kiss of true love will soothe the broken nerves, acts like the most effective painkiller, chase away bad thoughts and wake up from a magical coma. And then, as it is in fairy tales, there was a great joy, the princess married the prince and they lived happily ever after.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lynley

    A flip through the table of contents may reveal a few unfamiliar fairytales. You may even ask, "Why didn't I find these in my childhood collections?" Read them and you'll find out why: There's gruesome murder, incest and misogyny aplenty in any old fairytale, but this collection highlights some salient examples. If you haven't already I highly recommend turning next to a collection of Angela Carter's own short stories. She's a far superior writer to that Charles Perrault anyhow, and her feminist A flip through the table of contents may reveal a few unfamiliar fairytales. You may even ask, "Why didn't I find these in my childhood collections?" Read them and you'll find out why: There's gruesome murder, incest and misogyny aplenty in any old fairytale, but this collection highlights some salient examples. If you haven't already I highly recommend turning next to a collection of Angela Carter's own short stories. She's a far superior writer to that Charles Perrault anyhow, and her feminist revisionings such as those found in The Bloody Chamber will prove a good mental mouthwash. Are these stories for kids? Why not? If you're going to read your kid even the modern, bowdlerised version of Little Red Riding Hood, in which the moral STILL seems to be: 'If anyone does anything bad to you it's basically still your fault', and 'manly men such as woodcutters are required to save the day', then I don't see why you can't broach the subject of domestic violence after reading Bluebeard. The most irritating part of the Charles Perrault fairytales are the morals section he puts at the bottom. So I rewrote them. THE SLEEPING BEAUTY IN THE WOOD When choosing a life partner, look carefully at his family. Marry the man, marry his mother. LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD If you think you might assault someone, stay out of the fucking woods. BLUEBEARD Ladies, trust your instincts. If you think that old man next door is creepy, don't let anyone talk you out of it. Also, if your new husband treats you like a child and starts playing mind games with you, get out of there before that shit really hits the fan. THE FOOLISH WISHES When arguing with the most important person in your life, be careful what you say. Words once uttered can affect your relationship forever. THE FAIRIES When women are judged mainly on their looks, it's not really all that surprising if the most beautiful daughter in a household is ostracized by her embittered female relatives. Nor is it surprising that these women, after a lifetime of discrimination, have become embittered in the first place. It doesn't matter if pearls and rubies fall out of your mouth; as long as you a beautiful your prince will find you. You don't need to make any special sort of exertion; just leave home and go wandering through the woods. HOP O' MY THUMB If your own parents are so nasty that they'll take you and your siblings into the woods and dump you there to die in a time of famine, you don't actually owe them anything after that. If you survive that shit, make like a Scientologist and cut your ties. DONKEY-SKIN If your father wants to 'marry' you, get the fuck out of there and everything will eventually be okay. RICKY WITH THE TUFT Although men require women to be beautiful (for 'evolutionary reasons' or whatever bullshit they feed you these days), women are not to expect their male partners to be equally good-looking. If you're a woman, your beau can be the ugliest fucking bastard in the world, but as long as you really really love him, you'll eventually realise, with no magic whatsoever, everything about him is hunky dory. CINDERELLA; OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER You're more marriageable if you're both charming and beautiful. Even better if you're rich as well, but two out of three will suffice. If you're *really* beautiful, you may even attract a real prince. But do you really want a husband who's chosen you for your beauty, your lifelong acculturation as a compliant doormat, and your smaller than average feet?

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Kay

    Moving right along. Lady and the Tramp is unique to Disney (well y'know, except for Happy Dan, the Whistling Dog, but don't get me started), so next is the lovely Sleeping Beauty. I used the pitt.edu edition of this (no illustrations, just story). I think I've only previously read the Grimm version, because I had no recollection of an ogress trying to eat Sleeping Beauty's children! I also read the pitt.edu edition for the Grimm version of the tale (Lil' Brier Rose). Interesting that Disney quotes Moving right along. Lady and the Tramp is unique to Disney (well y'know, except for Happy Dan, the Whistling Dog, but don't get me started), so next is the lovely Sleeping Beauty. I used the pitt.edu edition of this (no illustrations, just story). I think I've only previously read the Grimm version, because I had no recollection of an ogress trying to eat Sleeping Beauty's children! I also read the pitt.edu edition for the Grimm version of the tale (Lil' Brier Rose). Interesting that Disney quotes this as "based on the classic children's tale by Charles Perrault" when their version aligns more closely with Brier Rose. Ah well, they mix it all together anyway. Oddly enough, Perrault's version was much more violent than Grimms' for this. I haven't watched this movie in a long time, so I'm excited to watch it on Blu-Ray. After Lady and the Tramp which has some of my favorite animated scenes ever.

  21. 5 out of 5

    monica ♪

    I don't know why I can't seem to find the exact same edition I own on goodreads. The one that I own is a kindle edition I downloaded for free from Amazon, which contains 5 stories: ✿ The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods ✿ Puss in Boots ✿ Blue Beard ✿ Little Red Riding Hood ✿ Cinderella or the Little Glass Slipper Those stories are kind of different from what I heard/read before. And to be honest I don't really like the Blue Beard story because, in my opinion, the story is too violence for children. But it' I don't know why I can't seem to find the exact same edition I own on goodreads. The one that I own is a kindle edition I downloaded for free from Amazon, which contains 5 stories: ✿ The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods ✿ Puss in Boots ✿ Blue Beard ✿ Little Red Riding Hood ✿ Cinderella or the Little Glass Slipper Those stories are kind of different from what I heard/read before. And to be honest I don't really like the Blue Beard story because, in my opinion, the story is too violence for children. But it's still an enjoyable read :) And it has a very beautiful kindle design. I've never read any kindle book with beautiful design before ♥

  22. 4 out of 5

    J

    This was a beautiful book with plenty of colored pictures to catch the eye. The only thing about the artwork is the formatting seemed to be off for the background drawing seemed to be the edge of a page so you had the dark brown line running through the words and even though it was see-through it didn't help. I enjoyed the various collection of stories that were included from Charles Perrault and although a few of the stories had some variations that I hadn't read before it was rather entertain This was a beautiful book with plenty of colored pictures to catch the eye. The only thing about the artwork is the formatting seemed to be off for the background drawing seemed to be the edge of a page so you had the dark brown line running through the words and even though it was see-through it didn't help. I enjoyed the various collection of stories that were included from Charles Perrault and although a few of the stories had some variations that I hadn't read before it was rather entertaining and brought up new questions such as Why did the fairy spare Sleeping Beauty's parents from taking the 100-year nap unlike the other stories? This is definitely one collection that I enjoyed and would prefer keeping around.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kali Davis

    Before reading this short story I never knew this is where most the fairytales originated from, and I like Charles Perrault had his dark twisted versions. It opened up my eyes to some of the fairytales I know about now, and how some of them still really aren't suitable for children. Perrault has a couple other short fairytale stories like Little Red Riding Hood, Blue Beard, and Cinderella or the Glass slipper, and these all had their own little twist about them as well. It was very interesting t Before reading this short story I never knew this is where most the fairytales originated from, and I like Charles Perrault had his dark twisted versions. It opened up my eyes to some of the fairytales I know about now, and how some of them still really aren't suitable for children. Perrault has a couple other short fairytale stories like Little Red Riding Hood, Blue Beard, and Cinderella or the Glass slipper, and these all had their own little twist about them as well. It was very interesting to learn about his reasoning about these tells, most were because of his children. I would recommend his short stories to adults so that they can get a different perception of things and can interpret the fairytales they were told as a kid. (131)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ameena

    OMG, I can’t believe these books are on goodreads. The Green Library /“المكتبة الخضراء” is my childhood memories, my mother use to read me these books when I was Little before bed, and as I grew older I reread them again by myself as an activity in summer vacation. These books are the first books that I have read and because of them that I started to love reading and they were definitely the beginning of my road into becoming the “bookworm” that I am.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Addicted.To.Angel

    OMG, I can’t believe these books are on goodreads. The Green Library /“المكتبة الخضراء” is my childhood memories, my mother use to read me these books when I was Little before bed, and as I grew older I reread them again by myself as an activity in summer vacation. These books are the first books that I have read and because of them that I started to love reading and they were definitely the beginning of my road into becoming the “bookworm” that I am.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alycia Kelly

    This story is about a child who had seven fairies as her godmothers. Six of the fairies gift the child, while the seventh has nothing to gift. With that being said, the seventh fairy godmother made it so that rather than dying, the Princess (child) falls into a deep sleep for 100 years and is awakened by the a kiss from the king’s son. I have always enjoyed stories such as this one. These stories are always so interesting to me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    Beautiful presentation This is a beautiful edition with gorgeous typeset, elaborate margins and magnificent drawings. I've never read Sleeping Beauty before, but this was a delicious treat...like a wonderful dessert. Short, sweet, and delightful. Thank you Amazon for these gorgeous Kindle editions of fairy tales. I feel like I found a pot of gold. Absolutely enchanting. Beautiful presentation This is a beautiful edition with gorgeous typeset, elaborate margins and magnificent drawings. I've never read Sleeping Beauty before, but this was a delicious treat...like a wonderful dessert. Short, sweet, and delightful. Thank you Amazon for these gorgeous Kindle editions of fairy tales. I feel like I found a pot of gold. Absolutely enchanting.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Inspired to read the original tale after seeing "Maleficent," to try to determine the accuracy of the whole thing. Pleasantly surprised at the higher level of the plot of the original story, much simplified by Disney's retelling. Simple and to the point. The translation I read was from "Old-Time Stories told by Master Charles Perrault," translated by A. E. Johnson (Dodd Mead and Company, 1921). Inspired to read the original tale after seeing "Maleficent," to try to determine the accuracy of the whole thing. Pleasantly surprised at the higher level of the plot of the original story, much simplified by Disney's retelling. Simple and to the point. The translation I read was from "Old-Time Stories told by Master Charles Perrault," translated by A. E. Johnson (Dodd Mead and Company, 1921).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    Very interesting, this is a different story then I've ever read. The moral of the story at the end is very true. If only more people realized what others already knew! I hope you enjoy this story Very different from other tellings, I liked the moral at the end. I read many versions to see how there stories very Very interesting, this is a different story then I've ever read. The moral of the story at the end is very true. If only more people realized what others already knew! I hope you enjoy this story Very different from other tellings, I liked the moral at the end. I read many versions to see how there stories very

  30. 4 out of 5

    Crystin McDaniel

    A classic tale told around the world Sleeping Beauty has long been one of my favorite fairy tales, and while I knew there were a couple versions, I had no idea there were as many as this book provides! I particularly liked the Irish version, though it took awhile for the 'sleeping beauty' part to be revealed. Very educational! A classic tale told around the world Sleeping Beauty has long been one of my favorite fairy tales, and while I knew there were a couple versions, I had no idea there were as many as this book provides! I particularly liked the Irish version, though it took awhile for the 'sleeping beauty' part to be revealed. Very educational!

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