web site hit counter Kirsten's Story Collection - Limited Edition - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Kirsten's Story Collection - Limited Edition

Availability: Ready to download

All six beloved Kirsten stories are bound in one keepsake volume. Set in 1854, each story reveals more of this brave girl who is making a home in a new land. The richly illustrated hardcover offers a glimpse into Kirsten's world. Inside, this book features even more full-color illustrations and words of inspiration that will delight girls who love Kirsten. All six beloved Kirsten stories are bound in one keepsake volume. Set in 1854, each story reveals more of this brave girl who is making a home in a new land. The richly illustrated hardcover offers a glimpse into Kirsten's world. Inside, this book features even more full-color illustrations and words of inspiration that will delight girls who love Kirsten.


Compare

All six beloved Kirsten stories are bound in one keepsake volume. Set in 1854, each story reveals more of this brave girl who is making a home in a new land. The richly illustrated hardcover offers a glimpse into Kirsten's world. Inside, this book features even more full-color illustrations and words of inspiration that will delight girls who love Kirsten. All six beloved Kirsten stories are bound in one keepsake volume. Set in 1854, each story reveals more of this brave girl who is making a home in a new land. The richly illustrated hardcover offers a glimpse into Kirsten's world. Inside, this book features even more full-color illustrations and words of inspiration that will delight girls who love Kirsten.

30 review for Kirsten's Story Collection - Limited Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cori

    Oh my gosh. I loved these books when I was little. I was actually in a Kirsten play. She's mah gurl. Oh my gosh. I loved these books when I was little. I was actually in a Kirsten play. She's mah gurl.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    reasons why this book was awesome: -for some reason as a child I had a thing for plots that involved deadly fevers. -kirsten is a cool name. -one room school houses -swedes! -santa lucia -braid loops

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shirley

    We listened to this set. I hadn't read the books before. I really liked the story! Great narrator. First book had some good descriptions of immigrating and of Minnesota that tied in well with our US geography class. We listened to this set. I hadn't read the books before. I really liked the story! Great narrator. First book had some good descriptions of immigrating and of Minnesota that tied in well with our US geography class.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    Rereading the American Girl collection is the best. From Kirsten, one learns to have heart and be brave. Kirsten is an immigrant and a pioneer, so we get two viewpoints in her books. (I always loved Kirsten, especially because of my mother's Swedish background.) I continue to hope that the current generation will find and love these books as much as I do. Rereading the American Girl collection is the best. From Kirsten, one learns to have heart and be brave. Kirsten is an immigrant and a pioneer, so we get two viewpoints in her books. (I always loved Kirsten, especially because of my mother's Swedish background.) I continue to hope that the current generation will find and love these books as much as I do.

  5. 4 out of 5

    DW

    Sometimes adult literature is just depressing (most "serious" adult literature) or nauseatingly fluffy (chick lit) or immediately forgettable (action thrillers) or boring (poorly-written non-fiction). On the other hand, there is a fair amount of children's literature that is uplifting and, dare I say, wholesome. So sue me for perusing the children's section at the library after having a bad week. I had probably read all of these books as a child, but I didn't remember most of them. I was struck b Sometimes adult literature is just depressing (most "serious" adult literature) or nauseatingly fluffy (chick lit) or immediately forgettable (action thrillers) or boring (poorly-written non-fiction). On the other hand, there is a fair amount of children's literature that is uplifting and, dare I say, wholesome. So sue me for perusing the children's section at the library after having a bad week. I had probably read all of these books as a child, but I didn't remember most of them. I was struck by the hardships of the Larsons crossing from Sweden and then traveling by train, riverboat, and walking to Minnesota. Somehow, when the whole family died in the old computer game Oregon Trail, we third graders never thought about children and parents *dying*. We were just disappointed we didn't win the game. I was also struck by Kirsten having to leave behind her doll for months. It's such a small object, with such a high emotional value, and all the children I know (including myself when I grew up) had more toys than we knew what to do with. Also the idea of Kirsten staying home from school (did she never go to school in Sweden? She didn't seem to know how to write when she was nine already) to help her mother cook and clean and tend the baby. Laura Ingalls' family always prioritized school when there was one available as far as I remember. They even studied at home. (Of course, as I learned recently, the Little House books were fictionalized, so perhaps that detail was altered.) I was also interested that Kirsten didn't feel any sympathy for the deer and rabbits her family killed and ate ... I suppose that makes complete sense, it's just a bit surprising to read in modern book. And spending the night in a cave with a corpse, yikes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Kirsten's stories were the most "scary" to me, as she lived in a rational poverty, as an outsider to a fledging, wild nation, that I had never known. I cried at her best friend's death of cholera along the way to the midwest. I scorned strict Miss Winston, who had no feeling for Kirsten's struggles with a new home. I was thrilled that she befriended Singing Bird, and that we got to take a glimpse into native american culture as well. In adulthood, as I come closer to my own ethnicity and immigra Kirsten's stories were the most "scary" to me, as she lived in a rational poverty, as an outsider to a fledging, wild nation, that I had never known. I cried at her best friend's death of cholera along the way to the midwest. I scorned strict Miss Winston, who had no feeling for Kirsten's struggles with a new home. I was thrilled that she befriended Singing Bird, and that we got to take a glimpse into native american culture as well. In adulthood, as I come closer to my own ethnicity and immigrant roots, I appreciate Kirsten's story more than I did as a child. They are definitely worth a re-read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Bartley

    Kirsten was my very first American Girl doll, and is still my absolute favorite. Her stories were so special to me when I was little, and getting the chance to reread them brought back special memories and a genuine love for the series that I nearly forgot I had. Meet Kirsten I remember getting this book while at the American Girl Store in Chicago when I was probably eight, and I read the entire book in the first hour of the drive home. I have always adored sweet and simple pioneer stories, and th Kirsten was my very first American Girl doll, and is still my absolute favorite. Her stories were so special to me when I was little, and getting the chance to reread them brought back special memories and a genuine love for the series that I nearly forgot I had. Meet Kirsten I remember getting this book while at the American Girl Store in Chicago when I was probably eight, and I read the entire book in the first hour of the drive home. I have always adored sweet and simple pioneer stories, and this is of course no exception. It has some sad moments and some happy ones as well. The author doesn't shy away from the tragedy that often came when making dangerous journeys like the one the Larson family takes. 4/5 Stars Kirsten Learns a Lesson Miss Winston is the coolest character! I would love to read where she is the main character. Singing Bird was also a nice character addition in this book, although I felt her storyline was a little far fetched. I think it would have been more believable if the two only communicated silently instead of assuming that both picked up English as quickly as they did. But I love this one so much. It gives me happy autumn vibes. 5/5 Stars Kirsten's Surprise This book always makes me so emotional. Kirsten wanted to surprise her family with a Saint Lucia celebration. This always reminds me of that Christmas my mom surprised me by getting me Kirsten's Saint Lucia gown and crown. I was so surprised. It is still my favorite outfit of hers that I own. I also think this is my favorite holiday book in the American Girl series. 5/5 Stars Happy Birthday Kirsten! Ahh this one always makes me teary too. The idea of a friendship quilt is so sweet. I wish this was still something people did. I also love the idea of a big barn raising party. I need friends with barns that need raising so I can come! They sound like so much fun! Also the scene with Kirsten and her Mama talking about the day she was born is such a well written scene. What am I saying, this entire series is so well written. 5/5 Stars Kirsten Saves the Day This was a cute read. Probably my least favorite in the series, although it was still pretty good. Most of the summer stories involve more suspenseful storylines, and I felt like this one was pretty minor. 3/5 Stars Changes for Kirsten The winter stories are always so good! I had actually forgotten about this one. It was a really good conclusion to the series. I wish this book series went on longer. They are just all so good. 5/5 Stars Final Rating: 5/5 Stars

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie Young

    There's so much to love about Kirsten, even when all her stories aren't collected into one pretty volume with gilded edges. I think my favorite of her books will always be Meet Kirsten. The dangers of immigration are so pronounced, but Kirsten is resourceful and excited about her new life. Kirsten Learns a lesson does brilliant work with second language acquisition, 19th century pedagogy, and some beautiful and progressive intercultural moments. There are tastes of Maryellen's scheming without f There's so much to love about Kirsten, even when all her stories aren't collected into one pretty volume with gilded edges. I think my favorite of her books will always be Meet Kirsten. The dangers of immigration are so pronounced, but Kirsten is resourceful and excited about her new life. Kirsten Learns a lesson does brilliant work with second language acquisition, 19th century pedagogy, and some beautiful and progressive intercultural moments. There are tastes of Maryellen's scheming without fully understanding the consequences in Surprise, Changes, and Saves the Day, which was stressful. St. Lucia Day coupled with some patience and bravery saves Surpirse. Saves the Day is way stressful like the whole time. Changes feels less coherent than it actually is, but it is really nice to see the Larsons settled in a big, beautiful farmhouse by the end of the series. The height of Kirsten's character comes in Happy Birthday where quilting is cool, yo! I was also struck by the thorough portrayal of eeking survival out of the land and the forest. Every book features real dangers and opportunities that were believable and convincing. All in all, a fantastic run, most of which I remembered with a few surprises along the way.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    As with the other American Girl books, this was an engaging series about a pioneer girl growing up and learning life lessons on the frontier in the 1850s. Though not as in-depth as Little House, they offer a good overview of what life was like, and a unique perspective on an immigrant's experience. I noticed a difference in the writing quality, these being by a different author than most of the other American Girl books, but it was still decent. As always, I enjoyed the illustrations and "Lookin As with the other American Girl books, this was an engaging series about a pioneer girl growing up and learning life lessons on the frontier in the 1850s. Though not as in-depth as Little House, they offer a good overview of what life was like, and a unique perspective on an immigrant's experience. I noticed a difference in the writing quality, these being by a different author than most of the other American Girl books, but it was still decent. As always, I enjoyed the illustrations and "Looking Back" section to learn more about life back then, with a focus on the immigrant experience.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Molly Grimmius

    Finished reading this series with Anne. I’m not sure how many times I read it... I know at least once with my mom and then a few times by myself as a girl. I absolutely believe that American Girl stories really put me down the path of living historical fiction. These are such a great stories... beautiful pictures, great stories, great length and great lessons! It was a delight to read with Anne.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I was a big fan of the American Girl books as a child but I had never read the entire series of Kirsten. As I child a I probably would have rated a 4, as an adult 2.5 so I settled on 3. Perfect for a young girl. Kirstens not one if my top Girl’s though- I remember loving Samantha, Molly, and Addy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kristen L

    My childhood self would have given this book a 4, but rereading (as an adult) to my child it's a solid 3. I'll probably end up rereading it again as she grows up and not dreading it but not excited about it either. My childhood self would have given this book a 4, but rereading (as an adult) to my child it's a solid 3. I'll probably end up rereading it again as she grows up and not dreading it but not excited about it either.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Allison Bell

    What can I say? I am a teacher and I like reading about life for kids with good, historical references.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    Read aloud with Emily, age 6

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    A fun story for children.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy Anderson

    My daughter has loved reading these AG books to me over the past few years. These are great stories about pioneer life set in the 1850's. My daughter has loved reading these AG books to me over the past few years. These are great stories about pioneer life set in the 1850's.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura Danielle

    I loved reading this series in elementary school and I'm glad I decided to reread them. I loved reading this series in elementary school and I'm glad I decided to reread them.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stasia

    Maybe it's the long winter days that draw me towards reading about cozy homesteads and the resilient pioneers who carried through, even in the hardest of times. Maybe it's the long winter days that draw me towards reading about cozy homesteads and the resilient pioneers who carried through, even in the hardest of times.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ranette

    From the American Girls Dolls

  20. 5 out of 5

    Becca!

    We loved listening to this audiobook series since it had the same vibe as the Little House books. On to Addy!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura Robinson

    Not as strong as the Addy books but still solid kids' lit. Not as strong as the Addy books but still solid kids' lit.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I haven't read these books since I was a kid. I think I was ten when I got my Kirsten doll for Christmas. At the time, I was really into the 'Little House on the Prairie' books and I was really excited to get my doll. Unfortunately, I actually had to return my doll soon after getting her when her eyelashes began to fall out. But I soon got a replacement and she became one of my fondest childhood toys. My sister and I would play with our dolls for hours (she had Samantha) making up new stories an I haven't read these books since I was a kid. I think I was ten when I got my Kirsten doll for Christmas. At the time, I was really into the 'Little House on the Prairie' books and I was really excited to get my doll. Unfortunately, I actually had to return my doll soon after getting her when her eyelashes began to fall out. But I soon got a replacement and she became one of my fondest childhood toys. My sister and I would play with our dolls for hours (she had Samantha) making up new stories and adventures for them. I can't remember when I got the boxed set of all her books. It might have been that Christmas, but I think it was a bit later. Which didn't matter much, since I'd already devoured all the American Girl books that I could find at the school library. I can even remember where they were. As you came in the door you would turn right and go around the circular computer desk. Behind the bulky Macintosh computers, on the bottom shelf - where you had to wedge yourself past the computer chairs - were the American Girl books. Not too long ago, I picked up my books from Mom's house. I've been feeling rather nostalgic for my childhood favorites (unfortunately, I also recently found out that my huge collection of Nancy Drews are long gone). Along with the box set of Kirsten's books, I also have Felicity's box set. Rereading these books was quite a trip. They're written in very simple language, as you'd expect for books marketed to ten-year-olds. The books themselves are slim - around 60 pages each - and focus on six focal events in the main American Girl's life: the introduction, school, Christmas, tenth birthday, an act of heroism, and the final moving forward book. In the case of Kirsten, we follow her as her family immigrates from Sweden to Minnesota and they work to build a new life. The thing that surprised me most in rereading Kirsten's stories was the sheer amount of terrible things that happen to Kirsten. Honestly, they're kind of horrible. In the first book, Kirsten's best friend Marta - whose family immigrates from Sweden with hers - dies of cholera...after they reach America. It's really quite tragic and heartbreaking. As the books move on, Kirsten befriends a Native American girl, Singing Bird, only to have her move West; Kirsten's mother almost dies in childbirth; a tornado sweeps through the farm; Kirsten and her little brother are attacked by a black bear; Kirsten and her father almost perish in a winter blizzard; their cabin burns down; and Kirsten and her older brother come across a dead man in the woods. I can't believe how many bad things happen to this poor girl! I don't remember such bad luck befalling any other American Girl. To top things off, Kirsten's at the root of half the terrible things that happen to her family. She foolishly puts her little brother and herself in danger when they get attacked by the bear and it's her fault that the family cabin burns down. Yet, in the end, it's hard work, perseverance, and a good amount of luck that gets her family through their first year in America. And, much as I did so many years ago, I ate the books up. However simply written, however frustratingly foolish Kirsten can be, I still enjoyed reading the books. I felt transported back to my childhood: reading curled up in bed or on the bus to and from school. Playing with Kirsten and Samantha dolls (and later our two Felicities) around the farm. It was a happy childhood, caught up in the world of our imaginations, and in rereading these books, it was like being ten again. Really, I can't ask more than that from a handful of paperback books. *Note: I have the dark burgundy boxed set with the classic white paperback covers.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    It was a bit of a let-down to go from the enjoyable Josefina books to Kirsten’s collection. Kirsten’s books deal with immigration (the first one), to learning how to speak English and dealing with Indian neighbors (the second one), to snippets of farm life (all the rest). And so, while the first two books are interesting, the last four are pretty boring. I’ve always described these first 6 American Girl collections as hardhitting at times, and though the first book deals with death by cholera, t It was a bit of a let-down to go from the enjoyable Josefina books to Kirsten’s collection. Kirsten’s books deal with immigration (the first one), to learning how to speak English and dealing with Indian neighbors (the second one), to snippets of farm life (all the rest). And so, while the first two books are interesting, the last four are pretty boring. I’ve always described these first 6 American Girl collections as hardhitting at times, and though the first book deals with death by cholera, the rest of Kirsten’s books don’t really fit that. It’s probably why I almost always think of her books last when I think of what I read as a child. One thing I did really enjoy was the beauty of this edition I was reading: hardbound, gilt-edged, with a transparent dust jacket. Though, this edition limited the historical notes to once at the end, rather than one after each book, which was disappointing. I am struggling a bit to come up with more of a substantial review, but I simply found Kirsten’s stories so uninteresting that I don’t really have much to say. I did a lot of eyebrow raising in the second book, where Kirsten befriends an Indian girl, though I did enjoy Kirsten’s portrayal as someone who is easily intimidated with learning new and difficult things, but presses on and overcomes them. In the later books, she very quickly becomes a rash, bold child who makes bad decisions frequently, like the time she got chased by a bear because she didn’t tell anyone about the honey tree she found, or the time she set her family’s cabin on fire because she brought a raccoon into the house despite her mother’s warnings. But she always manages to turn it around in the end because otherwise what sort of books would these be? Basically, I found Kirsten’s stories to be the least enjoyable so far. They’re not particularly memorable, either historically or otherwise, and they lack the complex issues and historical depth of many of the other collections.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Krista Rey

    I read Happy Birthday Kristen and I loved it. It is easy to read and has appropriate vocabulary for the 2-3 grades. The pictures are beautiful and it is a book that kids can relate too. This book is about a girl named Kristen whose family came to America from Sweeden. In this book, the family celebrates Kristen's birthday. The book starts out with her and her friends making a quilt together at school for their teacher. Kristen loves her friends and loves school. When her mom has a baby and gets I read Happy Birthday Kristen and I loved it. It is easy to read and has appropriate vocabulary for the 2-3 grades. The pictures are beautiful and it is a book that kids can relate too. This book is about a girl named Kristen whose family came to America from Sweeden. In this book, the family celebrates Kristen's birthday. The book starts out with her and her friends making a quilt together at school for their teacher. Kristen loves her friends and loves school. When her mom has a baby and gets sick, Kristen must stay home and help with the chores and the new baby. She feels missed out from school and she thinks that everyone forgot about her birthday. Her mom doesn't and has a birthday party for Kristen when all the families come over for the barn raising. Kristen feels so special to have all her friends over and they finish their quilt. When it is time to open to open presents, her friends gave her the quilt because they wanted her to feel their love. I really loved this book because it is fiction, but it shows this time period so well. It shows what life was like and what people actually did and kids can learn from this. This would be a book that teachers could use for silent reading time in the classroom as it is too girlie to read to the entire class.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Kay

    Kirsten was one of the original American Girls and as such, was a vital piece of my childhood. I can remember lying in the backyard barefooted, feet up, pretending I was an awesome pioneer girl. One of the most important points of the original American Girls was the use of realistic storylines. I still remember sobbing when Matra died, and feeling so horrible for Kirsten when her little racoon burned down the family home. The original American Girls were strong, yet open to learning. They were ins Kirsten was one of the original American Girls and as such, was a vital piece of my childhood. I can remember lying in the backyard barefooted, feet up, pretending I was an awesome pioneer girl. One of the most important points of the original American Girls was the use of realistic storylines. I still remember sobbing when Matra died, and feeling so horrible for Kirsten when her little racoon burned down the family home. The original American Girls were strong, yet open to learning. They were insightful, yet often made mistakes. In comparison to the newer additions to the historical characters, the worlds of Felicity, Kirsten, Addy, Samantha, and Molly cannot be topped. They were complemented by Kaya, Josefina, and Kit, but they have been replaced by Marie-Grace, Cecile, Rebecca, and Julie - all of whom have their own merits, but not near as much heart. Solid 4 stars. I wanted to be Kirsten, not Laura Ingalls Wilder.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Gouin

    How disappointing. Janet Beeler Shaw is at the wheel of Kirsten's stories, taking over the reins from Valerie Tripp. However, Shaw pushes the fast forward button on the already short stories, skipping over details and somehow making her characters void of any emotion. Kirsten is an immigrant from Sweden, her family wants to make a new home in America, out west to be precise. Vaguely brings up feelings of Little House as Kirsten learns English, picks honey, and burns down her log cabin. There is How disappointing. Janet Beeler Shaw is at the wheel of Kirsten's stories, taking over the reins from Valerie Tripp. However, Shaw pushes the fast forward button on the already short stories, skipping over details and somehow making her characters void of any emotion. Kirsten is an immigrant from Sweden, her family wants to make a new home in America, out west to be precise. Vaguely brings up feelings of Little House as Kirsten learns English, picks honey, and burns down her log cabin. There is some death early on, but the rushed story gives no real impact on the loss. Kirsten doesn't have any special quality as the first to Girls did, she's just inquisitive I guess? I know Shaw is at the helm of a few other Girls, so hopefully her style improves.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    When I was a little girl, my brother's girlfriend gave me her old Kirsten doll. Unfortunately, I thought that you could hairspray their hair. You really shouldn't, and I tried to fix it by giving her an uneven bob. I always think of my mutilated Kirsten doll when I read these books. Like my doll, Kirsten and her family just keep on surviving whatever is thrown their way. The story of immigrants is the story of America, and I'm happy that American Girl chose to tell Kirsten family. It's also ref When I was a little girl, my brother's girlfriend gave me her old Kirsten doll. Unfortunately, I thought that you could hairspray their hair. You really shouldn't, and I tried to fix it by giving her an uneven bob. I always think of my mutilated Kirsten doll when I read these books. Like my doll, Kirsten and her family just keep on surviving whatever is thrown their way. The story of immigrants is the story of America, and I'm happy that American Girl chose to tell Kirsten family. It's also refreshing that Kirsten's family is Swedish instead of Irish or German. I enjoyed learning more about the culture and traditions of her family.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Abrams

    I read Kirsten's Surprise A Christmas Story Reading level is upper elementary, 640L It is Historical Fiction This story was interesting but is limited in audience. I think girls will really enjoy this book. It is about one of the American Girl Dolls, Kirsten, telling the story of her life as a pioneer girl. Kirsten Larson and her family celebrate their first Christmas in America, but they try to keep their old traditions alive. Kirsten tries to celebrate as they would is Sweden telling of her stru I read Kirsten's Surprise A Christmas Story Reading level is upper elementary, 640L It is Historical Fiction This story was interesting but is limited in audience. I think girls will really enjoy this book. It is about one of the American Girl Dolls, Kirsten, telling the story of her life as a pioneer girl. Kirsten Larson and her family celebrate their first Christmas in America, but they try to keep their old traditions alive. Kirsten tries to celebrate as they would is Sweden telling of her struggles adapting to the new country and her hope to have a wonderful christmas with her family in America.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Briana

    There was a doll named Kirsten, one of 5 "American Girl" dolls at the time. She was all I wanted out of life for three years, until finally one glorious Christmas I got her, in her 1854 pioneer outfit, with the "Meet Kirsten" book about her new life in America (she was an immigrant from Sweeden). I have every accessory, book, outfit, and even furniture ever made for her. She was my obsession for a long, long time. The only doll I ever got into, as I was not really a doll girl, but I adored her. There was a doll named Kirsten, one of 5 "American Girl" dolls at the time. She was all I wanted out of life for three years, until finally one glorious Christmas I got her, in her 1854 pioneer outfit, with the "Meet Kirsten" book about her new life in America (she was an immigrant from Sweeden). I have every accessory, book, outfit, and even furniture ever made for her. She was my obsession for a long, long time. The only doll I ever got into, as I was not really a doll girl, but I adored her.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Wiggins

    Some girls love horses, some love dolphins, and some love pioneers. I don't mean to be sexist, but the majority of these fans are girls, in my experience. For the reader who hasn't already discovered the American Girls series, this is a great gateway bus-set. Lightly historical and very relatable, it's a popular choice for second grade book reports in my area. Readalikes: Dear America Series, the American Sisters series by Laurie Lawlor (a very sweet and smart former instructor), and the Little Some girls love horses, some love dolphins, and some love pioneers. I don't mean to be sexist, but the majority of these fans are girls, in my experience. For the reader who hasn't already discovered the American Girls series, this is a great gateway bus-set. Lightly historical and very relatable, it's a popular choice for second grade book reports in my area. Readalikes: Dear America Series, the American Sisters series by Laurie Lawlor (a very sweet and smart former instructor), and the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.