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Burn the Orphanage, Volume 1: Born to Lose

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Revenge is a dish best served with blazing side-scroller-style action in Burn the Orphanage: Born to Lose by Sina Grace (The Li'l Depressed Boy, Not My Bag) and Daniel Freedman (Undying Love). Rock was a young orphan when he was left for dead in a burning building, and now he's out to find the person responsible. With action inspired by 1980s video games like Double Dragon Revenge is a dish best served with blazing side-scroller-style action in Burn the Orphanage: Born to Lose by Sina Grace (The Li'l Depressed Boy, Not My Bag) and Daniel Freedman (Undying Love). Rock was a young orphan when he was left for dead in a burning building, and now he's out to find the person responsible. With action inspired by 1980s video games like Double Dragon and Streets of Rage, Rock will take on every goon and punk in the city, along with his friends Lex and Bear, who bring their own talents into the mix. A love letter to the games of yesteryear, Born to Lose chronicles orphan Rock's journey as he fights his way through the mean streets for revenge. This collected edition includes pages of never-before-seen art and loads of extras!


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Revenge is a dish best served with blazing side-scroller-style action in Burn the Orphanage: Born to Lose by Sina Grace (The Li'l Depressed Boy, Not My Bag) and Daniel Freedman (Undying Love). Rock was a young orphan when he was left for dead in a burning building, and now he's out to find the person responsible. With action inspired by 1980s video games like Double Dragon Revenge is a dish best served with blazing side-scroller-style action in Burn the Orphanage: Born to Lose by Sina Grace (The Li'l Depressed Boy, Not My Bag) and Daniel Freedman (Undying Love). Rock was a young orphan when he was left for dead in a burning building, and now he's out to find the person responsible. With action inspired by 1980s video games like Double Dragon and Streets of Rage, Rock will take on every goon and punk in the city, along with his friends Lex and Bear, who bring their own talents into the mix. A love letter to the games of yesteryear, Born to Lose chronicles orphan Rock's journey as he fights his way through the mean streets for revenge. This collected edition includes pages of never-before-seen art and loads of extras!

30 review for Burn the Orphanage, Volume 1: Born to Lose

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Someone burns down an orphanage in a book called Burn the Orphanage - this is a book that doesn’t mess about with things like subtlety or metaphor and goes for plain-speaking, up-front storytelling instead. And this is both its charm and its undoing. Burn the Orphanage is basically Streets of Rage/Double Dragon/any side-scrolling beat ‘em up: the comic. Rock (ruggedly handsome denim aficionado) and his buddies Bear (a big bearded gay dude) and Lex (tough street chick) fight their way through num Someone burns down an orphanage in a book called Burn the Orphanage - this is a book that doesn’t mess about with things like subtlety or metaphor and goes for plain-speaking, up-front storytelling instead. And this is both its charm and its undoing. Burn the Orphanage is basically Streets of Rage/Double Dragon/any side-scrolling beat ‘em up: the comic. Rock (ruggedly handsome denim aficionado) and his buddies Bear (a big bearded gay dude) and Lex (tough street chick) fight their way through numbers of faceless goons to the truth. But only the first of the three stories is about the burned orphanage – the second is a Mortal Kombat/Enter the Dragon-esque story where Rock goes to a mystical island to take part in a fighting tournament and the third is Rock running about a desert landscape fighting a big purple monster while Bear and Lex have a night out. The first two stories are really good. Their simplicity is refreshing and the action is fast and fun – if you enjoyed fighting games, either side scrollers (my favourite was Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles 2 for the NES) or beat ‘em ups like Street Fighter 2, you’ll enjoy this book. Some of the panels literally look like screenshots of side-scrolling games and, in the third story, literally incorporates elements of games like Mario and Sonic into the comic. The third story is definitely the weakest of the bunch. Most of it concerns Bear and Lex as they moon about love problems and the difficulty of committing to a relationship, which is just blah. Rock’s story where he enters a trippy desert landscape felt arbitrary and wasn’t as fun or interesting as his earlier adventures. There isn’t much to Burn the Orphanage – it’s a tribute to computer games both Sina Grace and Daniel Freedman enjoyed, and that’s about it. It’s not a very deep book and because of its shallowness, it’s hard to feel very strongly about it – “hey, I recognise that Goro-like character”, “wow that’s a wicked move!”, etc. is basically the most it got out of me. I didn’t really care about the characters, their lives or their world but their adventures were fun and the writing and art were both fine but nothing special. Burn the Orphanage, like the games it references, is enjoyable but dispensable entertainment.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    OK, so, many people's problems with the whole Marvel/DC parade of titles is that it is the same few reasons to have different characters fight each other time and time again. There are those, of course, who champion the alternative. Well, on this evidence I know which side I'm on. Calling a series 'Burn the Orphanage' when one opening episode is a revenge fight for said crime is pointless enough, but so is much of the rest of this opening volume. No sooner is that opening fight done than zap ban OK, so, many people's problems with the whole Marvel/DC parade of titles is that it is the same few reasons to have different characters fight each other time and time again. There are those, of course, who champion the alternative. Well, on this evidence I know which side I'm on. Calling a series 'Burn the Orphanage' when one opening episode is a revenge fight for said crime is pointless enough, but so is much of the rest of this opening volume. No sooner is that opening fight done than zap bang the hero character is taken away from his more interesting support cast and told to fight in an inter-dimensional battle royale, a fight against demons with only one outcome, win or lose. Part three here is the sidekicks bickering about their successes in relationships, while boring, lame-o, badly drawn boy gets to right a wrong regarding one of those demon races and a gigantic water balloon. All the fights are mediocrely drawn – that is until the killer blow is done just like that with no effect, or even off-screen. The whole balance of the piece – talky characterisation or action, realism or surrealism, sense or nonsense – is off-kilter, and the thread from one action problem to the other is just bonkers – and in a bad way. Come back, DC/Marvel, all is forgiven – when you waffle about a lucky belt it comes with sixty years of back story, not just as an abject lesson in how not to do things.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Holy sh!t this is amazing. Basically this book is a video game like double dragon or street fighter as a comic book. Also Kat dennings is in it. If you like fun books that don't have to make complete sense read this. Holy sh!t this is amazing. Basically this book is a video game like double dragon or street fighter as a comic book. Also Kat dennings is in it. If you like fun books that don't have to make complete sense read this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Burn The Orphanage Volume 1: Born to Lose' does start with a burning orphanage and a bunch of angry streetfighting types, but it never gave me a reason to care about the orphanage or even these silly cartoonish streetfighting types. The story started so abruptly, I felt like I had missed something. Usually orphanages are not remembered fondly, much less sought revenge for, but this is what Rock and his friends Bear and Lex do. Subtlety and nuance are not elements of this story. This is a street 'Burn The Orphanage Volume 1: Born to Lose' does start with a burning orphanage and a bunch of angry streetfighting types, but it never gave me a reason to care about the orphanage or even these silly cartoonish streetfighting types. The story started so abruptly, I felt like I had missed something. Usually orphanages are not remembered fondly, much less sought revenge for, but this is what Rock and his friends Bear and Lex do. Subtlety and nuance are not elements of this story. This is a street brawl with crudeness and violence. It's brashness offended me, not for brashness sake, but just the immaturity level of the story. Then the story moves into godlike creatures fighting aliens in an arena. It's a throwback to the Streetfighter type video games, but it just came across as silly overall. The art is inconsistent. Sometimes the drawings are good, sometimes, not so much. One sequence toward the end where Rock is hallucinating himself into a side scroller was brilliant. Showing Rock biting off testicles, decidedly less than brilliant. I like "in your face" books, but this one just didn't deliver for me. I was given a review copy of this graphic novel by Diamond Book Distributors and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Arthurs

    Burn The Orphanage, Daniel Freedman & Sina Grace (Image Comics, 2014) Collected edition of BTO comics #1-3. Streetfighters Rock, Bear and Lex vs. corporate thugs and villains, an alien deathmatch contest, and a giant monster. The intent of this comic series seems to be to take typical scenarios from video games and give the main fighter characters some depth of background and character. (Rock was the sole survivor of an orphanage fire, Bear is a big gay guy, and Lex has commitment issues and can't Burn The Orphanage, Daniel Freedman & Sina Grace (Image Comics, 2014) Collected edition of BTO comics #1-3. Streetfighters Rock, Bear and Lex vs. corporate thugs and villains, an alien deathmatch contest, and a giant monster. The intent of this comic series seems to be to take typical scenarios from video games and give the main fighter characters some depth of background and character. (Rock was the sole survivor of an orphanage fire, Bear is a big gay guy, and Lex has commitment issues and can't seem to find guys who DON"T want a serious relationship with her.) I thought this was an interesting challenge. Alas, I don't think this succeeded very well. The fight sequences were too video-gamey -- sometimes blatantly so -- to keep my interest. (Full disclosure: Over the years, I've found very, very, very few videogames that haven't bored me after a short period. I'm missing the Gamer gene, or whatever it is that attracts so many gameplayers so deeply.) The characterization, while not as cardboard or one-note as found in videogames, seemed rather strained and forced to me. In the end, my impression was that BTO was trying to have both the kind of characterization found in prose fiction and the kind of action found in videogames, and failed to fully succeed in either.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Davidg

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I saw this on sale and recognised the authors name, took a quick look on goodreads and saw the first couple of reviews were good so I took a chance. Now I remember where I knew the name from. I took an interest in a one shot comic last year at my local comic shop and the owner told me not to waste my time. He said the art was the worst and that Sina Grace only managed to get it published because he had an internship with a publisher. I have no idea if any of that is true as I did no further rese I saw this on sale and recognised the authors name, took a quick look on goodreads and saw the first couple of reviews were good so I took a chance. Now I remember where I knew the name from. I took an interest in a one shot comic last year at my local comic shop and the owner told me not to waste my time. He said the art was the worst and that Sina Grace only managed to get it published because he had an internship with a publisher. I have no idea if any of that is true as I did no further research and did not buy the one shot. The art in this book, while inconsistent, is not the main problem here. The writing is truly painful to read. The dialogue is written almost exclusively in cliche'. The plot is without subtlety or meaning. There are a couple of panels modelled on retro video games which almost raised a smile but then bring up the question of why the artist couldn't think of an original way to express his action scenes. This might not be the worst book I've ever read but it's certainly close. Hopefully I will now remember the name Sina Grace for the right reasons. Don't waste your time, there are too many great books elsewhere.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katbyrdie

    What a disappointment. To have the entire arc explained in the first issue was ridiculous. How incredibly simplistic is that? How can you name a comic after an arc that ends so suddenly? Maybe something drastically changed and the arsonist lied. If he did, let me know, but if now, that’s just ridiculous. I liked the “FIGHT” panels; it was, as stated, a great throwback to classic video games. The treatment of women was horrible. Half of them were naked, because women are unable to wear clothes. A What a disappointment. To have the entire arc explained in the first issue was ridiculous. How incredibly simplistic is that? How can you name a comic after an arc that ends so suddenly? Maybe something drastically changed and the arsonist lied. If he did, let me know, but if now, that’s just ridiculous. I liked the “FIGHT” panels; it was, as stated, a great throwback to classic video games. The treatment of women was horrible. Half of them were naked, because women are unable to wear clothes. Also, where were the stripper ninjas hiding the knives, because there was NO room for them! And frankly, do they have to be stripper ninjas. Really, you should just say, “Shit! The women are ninjas!” In conclusion, stopped after the story finished in a single issue and I got bored half way through the second. Other people will probably love this, but it was not what I was expecting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elia

    There was almost nothing about Sina Grace's Burn the Orphanage that I did not find confusing, starting with the title. You see, the title comes from the fact that the main character, Rock, grew up in an orphanage that burned down in an arson fire when he was a small boy. He was the only survivor, and spends his entire life trying to track down and get revenge on the man responsible...except he doesn't because this story line takes up only about the first dozen pages. Then, all of a sudden the sto There was almost nothing about Sina Grace's Burn the Orphanage that I did not find confusing, starting with the title. You see, the title comes from the fact that the main character, Rock, grew up in an orphanage that burned down in an arson fire when he was a small boy. He was the only survivor, and spends his entire life trying to track down and get revenge on the man responsible...except he doesn't because this story line takes up only about the first dozen pages. Then, all of a sudden the story gets really weird. Full review posted to www.shutupandreadsomething.blogspot.com on 6/24/14

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elle Markov

    The story for the title was explained in the first like 10 pages and then after that it was just random stories thrown together. Which would not have been bad if any of these stories had any point. The main character was a read douche and his friends were annoying; none of these characters were even remotely likeable or relatable. Normally in graphic novels, the characters are a bit farfetched, but they have likeable qualities that readers like and relate to. Not the case here. Read if you want, The story for the title was explained in the first like 10 pages and then after that it was just random stories thrown together. Which would not have been bad if any of these stories had any point. The main character was a read douche and his friends were annoying; none of these characters were even remotely likeable or relatable. Normally in graphic novels, the characters are a bit farfetched, but they have likeable qualities that readers like and relate to. Not the case here. Read if you want, its short and quick but ultimately a bore. Rating 1 out of 5 [email protected]

  10. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    As a lover of original and out of the box comics, I was excited to receive this one through the goodreads giveaway. I tried hard to get into this book, but because it was free I made myself finish it. It seems incredibly choppy, trying too hard to be Mortal Kombat meets Kick Ass. Half the time I had no idea how what was going on. Only the first issue in the book had to deal with an orphanage. Maybe I am missing something and this is based on a anime/video game or something and thats why I'm so c As a lover of original and out of the box comics, I was excited to receive this one through the goodreads giveaway. I tried hard to get into this book, but because it was free I made myself finish it. It seems incredibly choppy, trying too hard to be Mortal Kombat meets Kick Ass. Half the time I had no idea how what was going on. Only the first issue in the book had to deal with an orphanage. Maybe I am missing something and this is based on a anime/video game or something and thats why I'm so clueless.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Got this in a sale to try it out. Liked the title as a promise of adventure. Not sure I'll carry on with the series as I didn't get much out of this volume. It ambled and digressed and didn't really flow. I liked Bear as he was endearing, and reminded me physically of Gregory in The Nao of Brown. No one is really developed outside of tropes though. Got this in a sale to try it out. Liked the title as a promise of adventure. Not sure I'll carry on with the series as I didn't get much out of this volume. It ambled and digressed and didn't really flow. I liked Bear as he was endearing, and reminded me physically of Gregory in The Nao of Brown. No one is really developed outside of tropes though.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex Firer

    Well. In my quest to read everything I guess I read this. Nothing to do about it now I suppouse. It's sort of empty nostalgia where, unlike your Geoff Johns of Stephen DeStefano stuff you actually need to get ridiculously excited by the homage in order to like it. And I would if it wasn't so common online and elsewhere. Well. In my quest to read everything I guess I read this. Nothing to do about it now I suppouse. It's sort of empty nostalgia where, unlike your Geoff Johns of Stephen DeStefano stuff you actually need to get ridiculously excited by the homage in order to like it. And I would if it wasn't so common online and elsewhere.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I can understand what this tribute to side scrolling beat 'em ups is trying to do, but this is a mess. So much so that I kept checking that I hadn't missed panels or pages. I can understand what this tribute to side scrolling beat 'em ups is trying to do, but this is a mess. So much so that I kept checking that I hadn't missed panels or pages.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Penny

    Unique and compelling.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    Mayhem, blood , guts and brotherhood in this entertaing yet empty story of a streetfighter and his friends. Both human and supernatural.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Flores

  18. 4 out of 5

    Graham Faught

  19. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tristan Palmer

  21. 4 out of 5

    S. M. S

  22. 5 out of 5

    Devi

  23. 5 out of 5

    Candice

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  25. 5 out of 5

    David Konkol

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  27. 4 out of 5

    Duncan Monroe

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Devlin

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jason

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