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How to Speak Brit: The Quintessential Guide to the King's English, Cockney Slang, and Other Flummoxing British Phrases

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The quintessential A to Z guide to British English--perfect for every egghead and bluestocking looking to conquer the language barrier Oscar Wilde once said the Brits have "everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language." Any visitor to Old Blighty can sympathize with Mr. Wilde. After all, even fluent English speakers can be at sixes and sevens when t The quintessential A to Z guide to British English--perfect for every egghead and bluestocking looking to conquer the language barrier Oscar Wilde once said the Brits have "everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language." Any visitor to Old Blighty can sympathize with Mr. Wilde. After all, even fluent English speakers can be at sixes and sevens when told to pick up the "dog and bone" or "head to the loo," so they can "spend a penny." Wherever did these peculiar expressions come from? British author Christopher J. Moore made a name for himself on this side of the pond with the sleeper success of his previous book, In Other Words. Now, Moore draws on history, literature, pop culture, and his own heritage to explore the phrases that most embody the British character. He traces the linguistic influence of writers from Chaucer to Shakespeare and Dickens to Wodehouse, and unravels the complexity Brits manage to imbue in seemingly innocuous phrases like "All right." Along the way, Moore reveals the uniquely British origins of some of the English language's more curious sayings. For example: Who is Bob and how did he become your uncle? Why do we refer to powerless politicians as "lame ducks"? How did "posh" become such a stylish word? Part language guide, part cultural study, How to Speak Brit is the perfect addition to every Anglophile's library and an entertaining primer that will charm the linguistic-minded legions.


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The quintessential A to Z guide to British English--perfect for every egghead and bluestocking looking to conquer the language barrier Oscar Wilde once said the Brits have "everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language." Any visitor to Old Blighty can sympathize with Mr. Wilde. After all, even fluent English speakers can be at sixes and sevens when t The quintessential A to Z guide to British English--perfect for every egghead and bluestocking looking to conquer the language barrier Oscar Wilde once said the Brits have "everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language." Any visitor to Old Blighty can sympathize with Mr. Wilde. After all, even fluent English speakers can be at sixes and sevens when told to pick up the "dog and bone" or "head to the loo," so they can "spend a penny." Wherever did these peculiar expressions come from? British author Christopher J. Moore made a name for himself on this side of the pond with the sleeper success of his previous book, In Other Words. Now, Moore draws on history, literature, pop culture, and his own heritage to explore the phrases that most embody the British character. He traces the linguistic influence of writers from Chaucer to Shakespeare and Dickens to Wodehouse, and unravels the complexity Brits manage to imbue in seemingly innocuous phrases like "All right." Along the way, Moore reveals the uniquely British origins of some of the English language's more curious sayings. For example: Who is Bob and how did he become your uncle? Why do we refer to powerless politicians as "lame ducks"? How did "posh" become such a stylish word? Part language guide, part cultural study, How to Speak Brit is the perfect addition to every Anglophile's library and an entertaining primer that will charm the linguistic-minded legions.

30 review for How to Speak Brit: The Quintessential Guide to the King's English, Cockney Slang, and Other Flummoxing British Phrases

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    A pleasant read and a nostalgic look back to bygone days of time spent growing up in England. The terms were all familiar to me. One of the most endearing is "pottering" (noun, verb). As the author writes, "Do not be misled into thinking that pottering means filling your time in trifling ways - it is a national occupation." In other words, the purpose of going out to work to earn a living is so that one can come home and 'potter' about the garden, their creative space, which they defend against A pleasant read and a nostalgic look back to bygone days of time spent growing up in England. The terms were all familiar to me. One of the most endearing is "pottering" (noun, verb). As the author writes, "Do not be misled into thinking that pottering means filling your time in trifling ways - it is a national occupation." In other words, the purpose of going out to work to earn a living is so that one can come home and 'potter' about the garden, their creative space, which they defend against neighborhood pets and other nuisances.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    I liked this book because it didn't overload you with many British phrases and their meanings, but important, mostly heard of words, each with a brief history or just background. I totally recommend this book to those who would like to add a little Brit to their talk or just want get a little bit more understanding of the basic British slang. I'm so glad to have received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads :)! Those who don't necessarily find thick dictionaries appealing should go a I liked this book because it didn't overload you with many British phrases and their meanings, but important, mostly heard of words, each with a brief history or just background. I totally recommend this book to those who would like to add a little Brit to their talk or just want get a little bit more understanding of the basic British slang. I'm so glad to have received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads :)! Those who don't necessarily find thick dictionaries appealing should go ahead and give this book a try!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lex

    A fun quick read. I loved reading about the origins of some common and not-so-common British idioms... like "posh," or "Port Out, Starboard Home," which was the location of the cooler berths on ships back to England from India, occupied by those with the cash to afford them. As someone who is already an Anglophile, there was not enough new in here for me to make it truly meaty, and many of the British phrases were familiar to me as an American English speaker. I think non-native English speakers A fun quick read. I loved reading about the origins of some common and not-so-common British idioms... like "posh," or "Port Out, Starboard Home," which was the location of the cooler berths on ships back to England from India, occupied by those with the cash to afford them. As someone who is already an Anglophile, there was not enough new in here for me to make it truly meaty, and many of the British phrases were familiar to me as an American English speaker. I think non-native English speakers would benefit more from this than I did, but I did like it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Fun, but many of the phrases were already familiar. I do want to start using “Sweet Fanny Adams” though.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tandie

    Almost nothing that wasn't common knowledge to Yanks. The meanings of Brit phrases and words were explained in a tedious, boooooring way.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mahesh Naidu

    It's a good book for someone who is traveling to the big mighty aka Britain. It helps with the local slangs and peculiar English terms used in Britain. It is more like a dictionary of such words/terms

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eve

    Charming little book. I love the paper and design, but I expect more of the content.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Abhidev H M

    Lot of surprises

  9. 5 out of 5

    Justine Olawsky

    This is the sort of little, randomish book that one always feels a bit guilty about counting as a 'book.' It took maybe 2 hours to read through, and while charming and fun, it certainly was neither challenging nor substantial. However, when one is chugging toward a 60-book goal this year, one is likely to go ahead and count any wood-pulp-and-book-glue concoction with a front and back cover and an ISBN. So, one did; namely, I did. If you love all things British, you will like this book muchly. If This is the sort of little, randomish book that one always feels a bit guilty about counting as a 'book.' It took maybe 2 hours to read through, and while charming and fun, it certainly was neither challenging nor substantial. However, when one is chugging toward a 60-book goal this year, one is likely to go ahead and count any wood-pulp-and-book-glue concoction with a front and back cover and an ISBN. So, one did; namely, I did. If you love all things British, you will like this book muchly. If you do not, then you will probably think that these Brits are pretty self-absorbed with their own insularity, quirks, and foibles. I tend toward the former way, of course, but the latter makes sense to me, too. Maybe my reading lists lately have been too full of "Brits on Brits." We get it already. You're all very clever with words and you use hypocrisy as an art and you like to queue. OK, so that little rant might lead you to think that I did not actually enjoy this book as much as the 4 stars would suggest. Ah, but I did, and not even in the curate's egg sort of way, but in its entirety. First of all, "the curate's egg" -- an expression I had never heard before reading this collection, but one so evocative, I can hardly wait to incorporate it into my banter. Curate's egg, a noun phrase that describes something good in parts, but not on the whole. It comes from a cartoon from 1895 wherein a curate is eating breakfast with his bishop and is struggling to finish his egg. His bishop remarks, "I'm afraid you have a bad egg, Mr. Jones." The poor curate with all deference and anxiety makes eager reply, "Oh no, my Lord, I assure you that parts of it are excellent!" That is a useful sort of idea -- the gentle put-down. Also, I was gratified to learn the apocryphal history of one of my favorite British expressions, "Bob's your uncle." I actually had someone say this to me when giving me directions in London a couple years ago. It thrilled me to the tips of my toes. It originally began, perhaps, in an act of nepotism in a government appointments, and the idea of how easy it is to hold a job when "Bob's your uncle." There are countless other phrases and words that will fascinate and maybe even flummox. The author's voice, which plays a gentle editorializing role, is likable and not particularly intrusive. There is very little about Cockney rhyming slang (you would think it would take up a larger part of the book, based upon the subtitle) which is fine by me. I am not a fan of that linguistic tic. Just say 'hat' you weirdos.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tom Donaghey

    I won HOW TO SPEAK BRIT: THE QUINTESSENTIAL GUIDE TO THE KING’S ENGLISH, COCKNEY SLANG AND OTHER FLUMMOXING BRITISH PHRASES by Christopher J. Moore through Goodreads and found it amusing, informative and at times a bit droll, but no where did it come across as a true "How To" book your DIY guy or gal would use. Here is a collection that is, by premise, words or phrases that should baffle the average American when confronted with same, but I didn’t feel challenged by the definitions by and large I won HOW TO SPEAK BRIT: THE QUINTESSENTIAL GUIDE TO THE KING’S ENGLISH, COCKNEY SLANG AND OTHER FLUMMOXING BRITISH PHRASES by Christopher J. Moore through Goodreads and found it amusing, informative and at times a bit droll, but no where did it come across as a true "How To" book your DIY guy or gal would use. Here is a collection that is, by premise, words or phrases that should baffle the average American when confronted with same, but I didn’t feel challenged by the definitions by and large with the possible exceptions of Bluestocking, doolally, soppy and maybe Lollipop man and a few others. And I find it difficult to believe that doolally is used or know by most Brits. Still there was a fair bit of amusing word play here and on the whole the definitions provided, as well as the history lessons, were enlightening and fun. If you are traveling to Great Britain and want an essential guide to assist you through the journey, I suggest you find a good drinking mate and totter along with them to see you though. Find and attractive one and well, there you are or, as said in Brit-speak, Bob’s your uncle.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm

    Midly amusing book. This short little book looks at some common (and not so common) British words and phrases. It's arranged roughly by theme with words associated with that particular theme (food, people, language, manners and mannerisms, etc.). The explanations are relatively short (a paragraph or a bit more) and moving onto the next entry.   That's basically it. It's perhaps more helpful if you've not as familiar with some of the words/phrases and might make a good gift for someone who is going Midly amusing book. This short little book looks at some common (and not so common) British words and phrases. It's arranged roughly by theme with words associated with that particular theme (food, people, language, manners and mannerisms, etc.). The explanations are relatively short (a paragraph or a bit more) and moving onto the next entry.   That's basically it. It's perhaps more helpful if you've not as familiar with some of the words/phrases and might make a good gift for someone who is going on a trip to the region/studying abroad, or someone who has a particular interest in language/linguistics. It isn't exactly groundbreaking though and you can find other books of a similar nature (I think 'Stuff That Brits Like' is very similar to this in format).   Not much more to say. I bought it cheap and am glad I did so. Otherwise I'd recommend the library but I wouldn't rush out to read it either.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Cute little book explaining common British phrases and words. I’ve been reading a lot of UK based books lately so it was helpful. However many of the “British” words and phrases covered aren’t limited to use by the Brits, and are things I’ve said since I was a child (as an American).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kelly-Louise

    This is a fun, humorous little book about British sayings. If you are an Anglophile at all, or if you enjoy learning about the history of languages, you will enjoy this. I had never heard of the Cockney rhyming slang before, which was pretty fascinating. Now that I've read it, I will ship off my copy to my English mother since it will surely give her a chuckle or two. The one British saying I didn't get an answer to in this book is the term "donkey's years." So, I looked it up online at http://ww This is a fun, humorous little book about British sayings. If you are an Anglophile at all, or if you enjoy learning about the history of languages, you will enjoy this. I had never heard of the Cockney rhyming slang before, which was pretty fascinating. Now that I've read it, I will ship off my copy to my English mother since it will surely give her a chuckle or two. The one British saying I didn't get an answer to in this book is the term "donkey's years." So, I looked it up online at http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/do.... And lo and behold, it seems to have come about because of Cockney rhyming slang: Donkey's years Meaning A very long time. Origin A query at the Phrases and Sayings Discussion Forum asked if the British slang term for 'a very long time' was donkey's years or donkey's ears. My first thoughts were, "donkey's years of course - what would ears have to do with it?". It turns out that I was being rather hasty. Donkey's years is now the more commonly used slang term when meaning 'a long time', but donkey's ears, although used little in recent years, has been a jokey alternative for some time - certainly from the early 20th century, viz. E. V. Lucas' Vermilion Box, 1916: "Now for my first bath for what the men call 'Donkey's ears', meaning years and years." This slightly pre-dates the earliest printed version that I can find of donkey's years, in the US newspaper The Bridgeport Telegram, 1923: "With a heavy make-up, you'll be the cutest vamp I've seen in donkey's years." It is quite likely that donkey's ears was the earlier form and that it originated as rhyming slang, in an allusion to the length of the animal's ears. Donkey's ears/years is often shortened just to donkeys. That is characteristic of rhyming slang, as in syrup (of figs) - wig or plates (of meat) - feet. Donkey's ears works as rhyming slang whereas donkey's years doesn't. In rhyming slang the last word of a short phrase is rhymed with the word that gives the slang meaning; for example, trouble and strife - wife, apples and pears - stairs, etc. It makes little sense for the phrase to have originated in slang form as donkey's years, as that would rhyme 'years' with 'years'. The migration from donkey's ears to donkey's years was no doubt aided by the belief that donkeys live a long time. There's some truth in that. Lively Laddie, a donkey who had lived up to his name for many years while plying his trade on Blackpool Pleasure Beach was, until his death at age 62, a contender for the 'oldest living donkey' title.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rae

    “Phrases” is the operative word here. The book contains a goodly number of them with accompanying explanations as to etymology and usage. Quite entertaining. I was pleasantly surprised to know of most of them.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    It said Christopher Moore on the cover but it's the wrong Moore (Christopher J.). Not as amusing, informative or comprehensive as I'd hoped but reviewing it does give me a chance to use "a load of cobblers" in a sentence.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Una Rose

    Great and fun but left me wanting more. Still interesting and very worth reading.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dipra Lahiri

    Quick and amusing read, but nothing that the readers will not know. Word origins where provided are interesting.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Cute little book to give someone as a gift.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ana Carolina

    This book was ironically written in North American grammar. A fast read, interesting for foreigners and students of English, a good book of curiosities, may make you a bit hungry and wishing you could go to London. Although painfully aware of the still persistent class distinction in Britain.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Linsey Johnson

    I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads. 2.5 stars... I was frustrated most of the time reading this book. To be fair, I don't know if the book is meant for Americans specifically to see how our two countries shared language differs, or if it is also a manual for people for whom English is a second language. There was fun information and words I didn't know or had never heard, but there were also a lot of words and phrases also commonly used by Americans. "How to Speak Brit" and I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads. 2.5 stars... I was frustrated most of the time reading this book. To be fair, I don't know if the book is meant for Americans specifically to see how our two countries shared language differs, or if it is also a manual for people for whom English is a second language. There was fun information and words I didn't know or had never heard, but there were also a lot of words and phrases also commonly used by Americans. "How to Speak Brit" and "quintessentially British" just didn't seem like the right descriptions for the book. With those words and phrases were some interesting origins, but most of those were just a descriptions of things Americans already knew. Maybe the book should have a different title, or it should be split between two sections; one on the British origins of shared words and phrases, and one with exclusively British words and phrases. For example: in the explanation for the word "it" (as previously mentioned, a common word American children and joking adults use) a great joke from someone is used with "tenor" as a pun without a helpful explanation of the actual quintessentially British word it played off of, "tenner". Luckily, I'm an Anglophile and knew what it meant, but most Americans would be at a loss. My copy was missing pages 29 and 30, but that will more than likely be sorted out with the official print. I will forever be disappointed to not know why the Brits call french fries "chips." It will haunt me to my dying day.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Scott Haraburda

    Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ How to Speak Brit: The Quintessential Guide to the King's English, Cockney Slang, and Other Flummoxing British Phrases is a fun quick read of a dictionary of common British phrases. The book contains a brief description of linguistics and the history of Great Britain, along with complete definitions. I was expecting it to be list of unique phrases and words, along with their definitions and usages. Instead, it was a few, whi Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ How to Speak Brit: The Quintessential Guide to the King's English, Cockney Slang, and Other Flummoxing British Phrases is a fun quick read of a dictionary of common British phrases. The book contains a brief description of linguistics and the history of Great Britain, along with complete definitions. I was expecting it to be list of unique phrases and words, along with their definitions and usages. Instead, it was a few, which demonstrated to me how our two countries' shared language differs. Nevertheless, I plan to add some to my lexicon. The author is Christopher J. Moore, a writer, poet, translator and editor of both adult and children's books. He is known for writing In Other Words: A Language Lover's Guide to the Most Intriguing Words Around the Worldin 2004 and other books from across the pond. How to Speak Brit is good addition to one’s Anglophile's library.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Phair

    Won an ARC of this in GR Giveaways. Not as good as I'd hoped. Arranged in thematic chapters w/ 20 or so words or phrases explained in each such as "send someone to Canterbury"' "semi-detached"' "elevenses"' "at sixes & sevens" . We get probable origins for the term, how it evolved to current meaning, etc. Maybe because I read a lot of British fiction and watch a lot of British TV I was familiar with many of the phrases some of which are also common in US so it had a been there already feel to it Won an ARC of this in GR Giveaways. Not as good as I'd hoped. Arranged in thematic chapters w/ 20 or so words or phrases explained in each such as "send someone to Canterbury"' "semi-detached"' "elevenses"' "at sixes & sevens" . We get probable origins for the term, how it evolved to current meaning, etc. Maybe because I read a lot of British fiction and watch a lot of British TV I was familiar with many of the phrases some of which are also common in US so it had a been there already feel to it. Almost seemed aimed more at the British market rather than outsiders. The ARC had horrible faded text which was also tiny. The B&W woodcut-like illus also seemed faded. There was a good opening chapter on language, society and changes to common usage. The book did frequently give some good historical context but overall it provided both too much and too little content to be satisfying. For a more fun look at British colloquialisms see the glossary in any of Louise Rennison's hilarious juvenile novels.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shelly Donaghey

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. How to Speak Brit is not a guide book to the language but more of a collection of interesting stories about some of the less common words and sayings within the English that is spoke in England. Some of the words are so very common that they have long ago jumped the ocean and are in everyday use here. Other entries intrigue the reader but the solution to the puzzling statements are clearly explained. The third type of entry are those obscure tidlings which I suspect the author had to work hard How to Speak Brit is not a guide book to the language but more of a collection of interesting stories about some of the less common words and sayings within the English that is spoke in England. Some of the words are so very common that they have long ago jumped the ocean and are in everyday use here. Other entries intrigue the reader but the solution to the puzzling statements are clearly explained. The third type of entry are those obscure tidlings which I suspect the author had to work hard in tracking down, and not only the meaning of the thing but an actual living person who has used it in the past 20 years. But the writing is light and breezy for the most part, some of the inclusions are either fun, head-scratching or suspect as to the veracity of the actual reality of the word. Nonetheless, an enjoyable read, NOT recommended as the end all or be all in the world of linguistics, but a nice read while riding the train. I owe this book to a Goodreads win.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Cohen

    As someone who's fascinated with linguistics in general, I loved this book. Moore's light, airy, and amusing style of writing combined with his vast knowledge of linguistics and the history of Great Britain are wonderful. Here's a particular favorite: "Eavesdropper. Before gutters and street drains were in common use, houses had wide eaves to allow rain to fall far from the walls and windows. Going right back to Old English, this extended roof was known first as the eavesdrip, and later as eaves As someone who's fascinated with linguistics in general, I loved this book. Moore's light, airy, and amusing style of writing combined with his vast knowledge of linguistics and the history of Great Britain are wonderful. Here's a particular favorite: "Eavesdropper. Before gutters and street drains were in common use, houses had wide eaves to allow rain to fall far from the walls and windows. Going right back to Old English, this extended roof was known first as the eavesdrip, and later as eavesdrop. A passerby, standing under the eavesdrop, would be likely to hear conversations from within the house without the knowledge of those inside. Hence eavesdroppers were those who listened in to private conversations. In the British code of behavior, this simply isn't done, except of course, these days, in the interests of national security." The droll little observations Moore makes are great!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dakota

    I actually enjoyed this book, with the exception of some things. I am going to England soon and thought this book would be helpful to use throughout England. Although I feel like some British people don't even know these words, so I sent a couple to my friends who lived in England and they didn't even know them! I think Britain has evolved enough to where they don't say a lot of these words. Another issue I had was that there were sexual terms in this book, I'm a more "younger" teen and I don't I actually enjoyed this book, with the exception of some things. I am going to England soon and thought this book would be helpful to use throughout England. Although I feel like some British people don't even know these words, so I sent a couple to my friends who lived in England and they didn't even know them! I think Britain has evolved enough to where they don't say a lot of these words. Another issue I had was that there were sexual terms in this book, I'm a more "younger" teen and I don't enjoy many of the sexual terms throughout I book I thought I was going to be in love with. I have a weird obsession with England a.k.a an Anglophile, but at least it got me in the spirit. Overall, this book is ok, I don't recommend reading it with a family with younger children (although you can just skip the words), but overall it was a decent reading experience, but at least the cover is cute!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was a fun little read... not sure that I would classify it as the "quintessential guide". I have glanced through British English A to Zed and that is much more comprehensive but you don't exactly "read" British English to American English dictionaries (which is what that basically is). I was familiar with most of the terms/slang/phrases but I consider myself a bit of an anglophile so I may know more than the average American. There were also several that we use here in America but since the This was a fun little read... not sure that I would classify it as the "quintessential guide". I have glanced through British English A to Zed and that is much more comprehensive but you don't exactly "read" British English to American English dictionaries (which is what that basically is). I was familiar with most of the terms/slang/phrases but I consider myself a bit of an anglophile so I may know more than the average American. There were also several that we use here in America but since they were all accompanied by fun little tid-bits and history of origination. If this was longer I would have been more annoyed by it's faults but since it was a short little jaunt I enjoyed it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I received How to Speak Brit as part of a Goodreads giveaway. The title pretty much explains the premise of the book--a dictionary of common British phrases, with brief explanatory paragraphs for context, separated into category-based chapters (home, food, etc.). A quick read. Even as an American who just watches a lot of British TV and lives in a globalized world, I was familiar with most of the terms, but much of the cultural background Morton provides is very interesting for the history geek in I received How to Speak Brit as part of a Goodreads giveaway. The title pretty much explains the premise of the book--a dictionary of common British phrases, with brief explanatory paragraphs for context, separated into category-based chapters (home, food, etc.). A quick read. Even as an American who just watches a lot of British TV and lives in a globalized world, I was familiar with most of the terms, but much of the cultural background Morton provides is very interesting for the history geek in me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jill Hutchinson

    I ordered this book and didn't realize it was only 116 pages....it is more like a pamphlet! I had read British English, A to Zed previously and loved it. I expected that this book was of the same ilk but it was not. The majority of the words are ones that are also used by Americans and have the same meaning in both countries. A few expressions that are used in Britain only are listed but most folks that read British writers already know about "Bob's your uncle" or "at sixes and sevens". I was di I ordered this book and didn't realize it was only 116 pages....it is more like a pamphlet! I had read British English, A to Zed previously and loved it. I expected that this book was of the same ilk but it was not. The majority of the words are ones that are also used by Americans and have the same meaning in both countries. A few expressions that are used in Britain only are listed but most folks that read British writers already know about "Bob's your uncle" or "at sixes and sevens". I was disappointed.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cathi

    This is a fun, light-hearted little guide to British words and sayings, and I learned a lot about why Brits say the things they do. As with any good non-fiction book, it was both educational and entertaining. As a side note, I found that my mom used a lot of the sayings found in this book. Hmmm? Who would have thought that a small-town, southern Utah gal like my mom was using all sorts of British phrases in her everyday speaking? I wish she were still alive so that I could ask her where she heard This is a fun, light-hearted little guide to British words and sayings, and I learned a lot about why Brits say the things they do. As with any good non-fiction book, it was both educational and entertaining. As a side note, I found that my mom used a lot of the sayings found in this book. Hmmm? Who would have thought that a small-town, southern Utah gal like my mom was using all sorts of British phrases in her everyday speaking? I wish she were still alive so that I could ask her where she heard those phrases. Lots of fun to think about!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I won a copy of this through the Giveaway section here on Goodreads. It was a fun afternoon read. Christopher J. Moore splits the books into different sections (apperance, food, etc) and talks about the origins of British phrases related to each section. Some are more well known, while others were new to me. Though, a quick read, it was enjoyable. more than once I read passages aloud to a friend of mine. Who has added it her pile of things to read.

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