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45 Complete Works by Legendary Author Jules Verne - Including 29 Voyages Extraordinaires, 6 Other Novels, 9 Short-Stories and 1 Non-Fiction More Complete Works in English Than Any Other Jules Verne Compilation! The Jules Verne Anthology contains 45 individual works by Jules Verne, the peerless master of science fiction. Included are 29 complete novels from the celebr 45 Complete Works by Legendary Author Jules Verne - Including 29 Voyages Extraordinaires, 6 Other Novels, 9 Short-Stories and 1 Non-Fiction More Complete Works in English Than Any Other Jules Verne Compilation! The Jules Verne Anthology contains 45 individual works by Jules Verne, the peerless master of science fiction. Included are 29 complete novels from the celebrated series "Voyages Extraordinaires" (such as 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' and 'Round the World in 80 Days'), plus 6 more entire novels, 9 rare short stories, and also Jules Verne's magisterial historical work detailing the lives of the great Explorers of the World. There are many works in this anthology that have been left out of most other Jules Verne collections. All the works have been carefully checked and edited for any errors, and the ebook is beautifully formatted with color images and covers for each individual book. There is a fully interactive table of contents, including all the individual chapters for each book in the volume, for ease of navigation and an improved reading experienceThe texts included in this ebook are as follows: Voyages Extraordinaires 1. Five Weeks in a Balloon 2. The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras 3. Journey to the Center of the Earth 4. From the Earth to the Moon 5. In Search of the Castaways, or, The Children of Captain Grant 6. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea 7. Around the Moon (Sequel to 'From the Earth to the Moon') 8. The Adventures of Three Englishmen and Three Russians in Southern Africa 9. The Fur Country, or, Seventy Degrees North Latitude 10. Around the World in Eighty Days 11. The Mysterious Island 12. The Survivors of the Chancellor 13. Michael Strogoff, or, The Courier of the Czar 14. Off On a Comet, or, Hector Servadac 15. The Underground City, or, The Child of the Cavern 16. Dick Sands the Boy Captain 17. Tribulations of a Chinaman in China 18. Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon 19. Godfrey Morgan 20. The Green Ray 21. Mathias Sandorf 22. Ticket No. "9672" 23. Robur the Conqueror 24. Topsy Turvy, or, The Purchase of the North Pole 25. Caesar Cascabel 26. Claudius Bombarnac 27. Facing the Flag 28. An Antarctic Mystery, or, The Sphinx of the Ice-Fields 29. The Master of the World Other Novels 30. The Waif of the Cynthia 31. The Abandoned 32. The Blockade Runners 33. The Pearl of Lima, a Story of True Love 34. In the Year 2889 35. A Voyage in a Balloon Short Stories 36. Doctor Ox's Experiment 37. Master Zacharius 38. A Drama in the Air 39. A Winter in the Ice 40. The Fortieth French Ascent of Mont Blanc 41. Frritt-Flacc 42. A Drama in Mexico 43. The Mutineers of the "Bounty" 44. An Express of the Future Non-Fiction 45.


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45 Complete Works by Legendary Author Jules Verne - Including 29 Voyages Extraordinaires, 6 Other Novels, 9 Short-Stories and 1 Non-Fiction More Complete Works in English Than Any Other Jules Verne Compilation! The Jules Verne Anthology contains 45 individual works by Jules Verne, the peerless master of science fiction. Included are 29 complete novels from the celebr 45 Complete Works by Legendary Author Jules Verne - Including 29 Voyages Extraordinaires, 6 Other Novels, 9 Short-Stories and 1 Non-Fiction More Complete Works in English Than Any Other Jules Verne Compilation! The Jules Verne Anthology contains 45 individual works by Jules Verne, the peerless master of science fiction. Included are 29 complete novels from the celebrated series "Voyages Extraordinaires" (such as 'Journey to the Centre of the Earth' and 'Round the World in 80 Days'), plus 6 more entire novels, 9 rare short stories, and also Jules Verne's magisterial historical work detailing the lives of the great Explorers of the World. There are many works in this anthology that have been left out of most other Jules Verne collections. All the works have been carefully checked and edited for any errors, and the ebook is beautifully formatted with color images and covers for each individual book. There is a fully interactive table of contents, including all the individual chapters for each book in the volume, for ease of navigation and an improved reading experienceThe texts included in this ebook are as follows: Voyages Extraordinaires 1. Five Weeks in a Balloon 2. The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras 3. Journey to the Center of the Earth 4. From the Earth to the Moon 5. In Search of the Castaways, or, The Children of Captain Grant 6. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea 7. Around the Moon (Sequel to 'From the Earth to the Moon') 8. The Adventures of Three Englishmen and Three Russians in Southern Africa 9. The Fur Country, or, Seventy Degrees North Latitude 10. Around the World in Eighty Days 11. The Mysterious Island 12. The Survivors of the Chancellor 13. Michael Strogoff, or, The Courier of the Czar 14. Off On a Comet, or, Hector Servadac 15. The Underground City, or, The Child of the Cavern 16. Dick Sands the Boy Captain 17. Tribulations of a Chinaman in China 18. Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon 19. Godfrey Morgan 20. The Green Ray 21. Mathias Sandorf 22. Ticket No. "9672" 23. Robur the Conqueror 24. Topsy Turvy, or, The Purchase of the North Pole 25. Caesar Cascabel 26. Claudius Bombarnac 27. Facing the Flag 28. An Antarctic Mystery, or, The Sphinx of the Ice-Fields 29. The Master of the World Other Novels 30. The Waif of the Cynthia 31. The Abandoned 32. The Blockade Runners 33. The Pearl of Lima, a Story of True Love 34. In the Year 2889 35. A Voyage in a Balloon Short Stories 36. Doctor Ox's Experiment 37. Master Zacharius 38. A Drama in the Air 39. A Winter in the Ice 40. The Fortieth French Ascent of Mont Blanc 41. Frritt-Flacc 42. A Drama in Mexico 43. The Mutineers of the "Bounty" 44. An Express of the Future Non-Fiction 45.

30 review for The Jules Verne Anthology: 45 Complete Works, Including 29 Voyages Extraordinaires, 6 Other Novels, 9 Short Stories and 1 Non-Fiction.

  1. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    It definitely doesn't feel like it took me a month to get through this monstrosity. Though I did break between books with other novels, so it was much more manageable. So. Jules Verne, one of our great forefathers of science fiction. He provides massive amounts of science and math, which go above my head most of the time. Regardless, I like him. I even like the movies that were based upon his novels. Even after this collection, I still want to read more of his stuff. A reliable source (aka, Wikip It definitely doesn't feel like it took me a month to get through this monstrosity. Though I did break between books with other novels, so it was much more manageable. So. Jules Verne, one of our great forefathers of science fiction. He provides massive amounts of science and math, which go above my head most of the time. Regardless, I like him. I even like the movies that were based upon his novels. Even after this collection, I still want to read more of his stuff. A reliable source (aka, Wikipedia) claims there's a novella to be had... Onto the book reviews! 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Enter the world of the Nautilus, a secert submarine in control of one Captain Nemo. Professor Aronnax and his companions discover it accidentally, believing to be hunting a massive narwal, and are taken on an underwater trip around the world. While the professor's lists of underwater life are exhausting, it's a world that's easily imagined. But it's not all joy—they're prisoners of Captain Nemo, for whoever boards the Nautilus is there the rest of his days. Aronnax is torn between exploring the seas—which he has already been studying—and escaping with his companions to the lives they once knew. Much of the story is exploration and admiration of sea life which, after a while, is tedious. Especially when you don't know anything about fish. But the action scenes, when stuff actually happens, is quite good. We explore shipwrecks and lost treasure, and come across some nasty sea beasts. I wouldn't mind having a Naitulus of my own. Assuming I'd be able to leave it one day, of course. A Journey to the Center of the Earth This is basically the same concept, except we're now traveling through the earth rather than the sea. But thanks to my Earth Science class way back in the 9th grade, I'm kind of fascinated by geology. And as they travel, they discuss the earth's layers and discover long-forgotten plants and animals thought to be extinct. Coolest thing ever? I think so. Journey to the Moon and Round the Moon Lumping these together, as one's the sequel to the other. Cool concept—building a giant gun that will shoot a projectile at the moon. But there's so much math and science that it makes my head spin. I don't care about figures; I care about the story. Tough to get through the first book. And the second goes through the "bullet's" actual journey, which I thought would be more interesting, but it was still chocked full of scientific babble. Which is unfortunate, because I was rather liking the characters. But they're so intelligent that I don't understand a word they're saying most of the time. Around the World in Eighty Days Mr. Fogg, a reclusive English gentleman, places a bet that he can go around the world in 80 days. He brings his rambunctious servant with him. Meanwhile, a detective is following them because he believe Mr. Fogg is a bank robber. I actually found myself laughing throughout this book. The servant is an idiot and always getting into trouble, and the detective isn't at all sly about his sneaking about. Yes, it's yet another story about travel, but it includes someone following them around—which makes it infinitely more fun. Short Stories I wish Verne had written more short stories. They're so bizarre that I love them. In Dr. Ox's Experiment, a slow, peaceful town goes beserk due to (you guessed it) Dr. Ox's experiement, who is an outsider. The people of this town are easy-going to the point of being lethargic—business meetings take six hours, and nothing is resolved (no one has made a decision in the town for hundreds of years). Engagements last ten years. It's ridiculous to the point of being hysterical. Master Zacharius focuses around a clock maker whose existence depends upon the workings of his clocks. Literally. Easily my favorite short story of the bunch. He makes himself crazy trying to figure out why his watches are dying, much to the dismay of his daughter and apprentice. And then there's that creepy little man with a clock for a face that always follows them... A Drama in the Air was a little dry for me to get through, as it dealt mostly with facts about ballooning. Again we're dealing with a crazed man (do we see a trend?) who jumps into a balloon as it's ascending, frightening the balloonist, and takes over the trip. His purpose is to die in a ballooning accident. Honestly, how did he come up with this stuff?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Silvana

    February 17, 2016: Read six of them eons ago, but there are still many voyages extraordinaires novels I haven't got the chance to read. So tonight I watched Discovery's Prophet of Science because it is about Verne. And apparently he did made other scientific 'prophecies' aside from the moon landing, submarines, fuel cell cars and so on. 'Robur the Conquerer' was mentioned (steampunk airplane!) so I gotta read this one. Then, in Kindle store, I found this collection for only $0.99. That's like the February 17, 2016: Read six of them eons ago, but there are still many voyages extraordinaires novels I haven't got the chance to read. So tonight I watched Discovery's Prophet of Science because it is about Verne. And apparently he did made other scientific 'prophecies' aside from the moon landing, submarines, fuel cell cars and so on. 'Robur the Conquerer' was mentioned (steampunk airplane!) so I gotta read this one. Then, in Kindle store, I found this collection for only $0.99. That's like the deal of the century despite the end of copyright, but still, having it in bundling, electronic form is so much easier, plus I got to carry the father of sci-fi's writing everywhere I go. March 2, 2016: I just finished reading Robur's story and while it was fascinating, especially at the stard and the end, there were not many things happening during the journey. It became rather sluggish to say the least. Funny that Discovery says he was something of a villain, I was expecting an egomaniac with violent behavior but I only saw a genius whose invention proved to be the best. But maybe Verne wanted to show the other people's behaviour, ignorant, ungrateful and selfish as they were. Rating for the story itself: 2.5/5

  3. 4 out of 5

    Doe

    I've never read anything by Verne that I didn't like!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul Devall

    Classic.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tim Meechan

    To be clear, I haven't finished the entire tomb, just Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, I decided to read this due to Jules Verne's writings being referred to in both of the novels I just completed, Bedtime Stories by Joseph Blum and the Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Although each came from very different backgrounds, the main characters in both stories had enjoyed Verne's writings while growing up, as I had, over 40 years ago. My thought was, time to read him again, and slip back to my t To be clear, I haven't finished the entire tomb, just Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, I decided to read this due to Jules Verne's writings being referred to in both of the novels I just completed, Bedtime Stories by Joseph Blum and the Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini. Although each came from very different backgrounds, the main characters in both stories had enjoyed Verne's writings while growing up, as I had, over 40 years ago. My thought was, time to read him again, and slip back to my teenage years, a time when I was joyously amazed by the stories and the imagery presented by adventure authors. Most readers will be familiar with the common belief that Verne wrote of things not yet discovered or proven, as if they were, in some cases, standards of technology at the time. TV's, submarines, etc. I'm told the list is quite long. This allows him to write in a style, that after 150 years, is still incredibly enjoyable, and with great suspense. I was pleasantly surprised to find a story that was well written, had good character development, and has stood the test of time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jerri Brissette

    These tales were amazing in that they were way ahead of their time. Jules Verne, obviously, had a scientific mind, which I, unfortunately, do not share. That made some of the reading laborious for me in Twenty Leagues and Journey to the Center of the Earth. Too many calculations for my poor mind to follow, even if I wanted to. That is most likely why I enjoyed Around the World in Eighty Days most.

  7. 5 out of 5

    BENJAMIN J TARTAGLIA JR

    Interesting historical references Some themes are repetitive and the endings are not usually surprises but he still keeps you reading on. In their day they were the best entertainment due to their vision of the future today a window to the past but still entertaining.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sara Warren

    This was a book I've heard a lot about and was curious about but never read until now. It was very descriptive and creative for it's time. You can definitely tell by the language and vocabulary used that it was written long ago. Not the best book I've read but definitely worth the read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    iainascot

    :-Dated Badly dated but that is to be expected. Drags a bit but still a classic.add to your collection and save

  10. 4 out of 5

    Grace F2

    Exciting adventure, very intense and fun to read. It was a harder read and took a while, but I loved it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

    Research.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dasha Webb-Benjamin

    Oh, Jules Verne! The worlds you took me to! I don't know how kids would perceive him now, but in the 90s, he was still magical.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heather Hagberg

    This was a really fun and adventurous read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Jules Verne does a pretty good job of having creating interesting stories that are compelling but bogs them down in details about the geography or flora and fauna. I realize these stories were meant to teach about different climates and geographies and all that but at the same time it made them harder to read. Also, did the usefulness of pemmican in exploration have to be described every time it is mentioned? No. Overall they are good but can be slow to get through. Five Weeks in a Balloon - Jules Verne does a pretty good job of having creating interesting stories that are compelling but bogs them down in details about the geography or flora and fauna. I realize these stories were meant to teach about different climates and geographies and all that but at the same time it made them harder to read. Also, did the usefulness of pemmican in exploration have to be described every time it is mentioned? No. Overall they are good but can be slow to get through. Five Weeks in a Balloon - 3 stars - It was very enjoyable and the descriptions of the technology used was interesting. The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras - 3 stars - It was good but Captain Hatteras really needed to calm down and be patient and he probably would have succeeded without as many hardships. A Journey to the Interior of the Earth - 2 stars - Axel had a temperament that changed too quickly for me to really care about him, Hans was awesome though. It is fascinating to read the completely false theories that scientists had about what was at the center of the Earth. From the Earth to the Moon - 3 stars - "Selenites" gotta love that word. This definitely ends on a cliff hanger and I'm looking forward to reading the sequel Around the Moon. In Search of the Castaways - 3.5 stars - This would be an awesome book if the point wasn't to describe the flora and fauna of the different countries and describe who discovered what. I mean its got natural disasters galore (earthquakes, volcanoes, twisters, hurricanes, floods etc.), helpful natives, wolves, bandits, cannibals, characters of a dubious nature, romance, and a mysterious note. This is all buried under a lot of descriptions that don't advance the plot at all and which slowed it down way too much. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea - 2 stars - Why is this considered a classic?! Eighty present of it didn't further the plot and reads like a text book. Jules Verne had an awesome character in Captain Nemo and despite hinting at his back story the book ends without resolving or explaining anything. I probably would have liked this better if I didn't have these expectations that it would be the most awesome of this collection since it is the one with the most movies. Around the Moon - 3 stars - A good sequel but hilariously wrong. They got rid of their waste by opening the door and throwing it out. How about explosive decompression? The Fur Country - 3 stars - This is more religious than any of the Jules Verne's other books I have read so far. Everything that could go wrong does go wrong and yet only one of the 21 characters becomes suicidal. It is more of a story of faith than anything. They do all that they can to survive and leave the rest up to Providence. Around the World in Eighty Days - 3 stars - What is with Jules Verne and creating mysterious characters whose back story is never explained, first Captain Nemo and now Phileas Fogg. The difficulties of travel on various vehicles was enlightening but it was at times hard to tell how much time had passed. The voyage from Japan to the United States got like a sentence whereas from Hong Kong to Shanghai got a couple of chapters. I did like Phileas Fogg and in particular how he kept his calm no matter what. The Mysterious Island - 3.5 stars - Human ingenuity is amazing and yet I doubt the castaways would have been able to accomplish as much if the island hadn't been so unusually fertile and Cyrus Harding wasn't an encyclopedia of useful knowledge. I would have liked to see Harding show some of the strain of leadership and everyone's expectations. The Survivors of the Chancellor - 3 stars - This is different from the other books in that there aren't really any descriptions of the flora and fauna. Michael Strogoff - 3 stars - Trip across Russia in a time of war. It resolved really quickly, too quickly in fact, but other than that it was good. Off on a Comet - 2 stars - I had a hard time with this one. It has an interesting premise but astronomy doesn't interest me as much as using materials at hand to survive and even thrive and there wasn't a lot of that going on in this story. The Underground City - 3.5 stars - Shorter than his other stories and the plot was engaging. It seems like the really only danger in a mine according to Jules Verne is fire-damp (carbureted hydrogen), I would have thought cave-ins were just as likely and dangerous. Also, hy would you want to live in a mine? Dick Sand, A Captain at Fifteen - 2 stars - This has a very interesting plot but loses itself in being informative. An entire chapter was used to talk about Dr. Livingstone and then to tell us that he died and therefore has nothing to do with the story. WHY? Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon - 3 stars - This started out really slow. The first half was really just exposition and of course the details of Amazon river and everything along its banks. The second half has the story of blackmail and a cryptic message from a dead man, far more interesting and easier to read than the first half and it kind of made up for the first half. Godfrey Morgan - 2 stars - Jules Verne loved Daniel Defoe's work because this is just Robinson Crusoe lite. Ticket 9672 - 3 stars - This was different because instead of following the world traveler we stayed with those at home. Granted those that stayed at "home" did quite a bit of traveling; they just didn't travel as far. Robur the Conqueror - 2 stars - Robur did a lot of things that I think are contradictory to what his stated goal was. He also went about trying to accomplish his goal in the most roundabout way imaginable and it bit him in the butt. I did find it funny that Jem Chip being a vegetarian was mentioned every time he was talked about. The Purchase of the North Pole, or Topsy Turvy - 1.5 stars - Captain Hatteras's journey to the north pole is completely ignored which is odd. Maston, Nicholl, and Barbicane are arrogant and self-centered. They don't care about the effects (lose of life and destruction of property) of what they are trying to do except the profits they gain from having bought the area around the north pole. The Adventures of a Special Correspondent - 2.5 stars - The story is good but I didn't like the way it was presented. If it had been written as if it were a series of news paper columns instead of taking about all the things he was going to or wanted to write about I would have liked it better. Facing the Flag - 3 stars - It was good. I did have an issue with the treatment of Thomas Roch. He is said to be a genius with a past of creating great marvels and yet no one is willing to give him credit to at least prove his latest creation. An Antarctic Mystery - 3 stars - This is a sequel to Edgar Allan Poe's The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym which I haven't read but Jules Verne does a good job of summarizing it so I didn't feel lost at any point. Doctor Ox's Experiment - 2 stars - Doctor Ox is a thoroughly unscrupulous character. His experiment takes precedence over everything even the safety of others. Master Zacharius - 1 star - I think there was some moral about not taking science so far that it overpowers or replaces faith but I don't really know. It also might have just been about a crazy old craftsman. A Winter Amid the Ice - 3.5 stars - A good adventure/love story. A Drama in the Air - 2.5 stars - Jules Verne is a big fan of aeronautics and yet he wrote a story that lists a bunch of aeronautic disasters in the middle of describing one. He ends by saying that these disasters shouldn't discourage adventurers and inventors. Way to be encouraging Verne, way to be encouraging. The Fourtieth French Ascent of Mont Blanc - 2 stars - This is by both Paul and Jules Verne. It describes a lot of mountain climbing disasters and ends with saying it wasn't worth it. For someone who spends the rest of his stories telling how great the achievement is this seems out of place. The Pearl of Lima - 1 star - I can't say why I didn't like this book without giving away the ending. It was great until the last page. The Blockade Runners - 3.5 stars - Jules Verne does a lot of love stories set in times of peril or war. This one is during the Civil War. The Waif of the Cynthia - 3.5 stars - A good adventure and mystery. It started slow but picked up quickly. The Year 2885 - 3 stars - Wow, Verne thought the mean life expectance going from 37 to 52 would take one thousand years. Interesting look at what someone from 1885 thought a thousand years of technological advancement would look like. Master of the World - 2 stars - This took a long time to get to the point. Verne repeatedly related some facts about geography and said they were important to the story and yet they weren't. I would have understood it without all the extra info.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Oscar Basuyaux

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Sunday 3 May A Journey to the Center of the Earth is book written by the French author, Jules Verne. After reading it in two languages, the novel turns out to be really good. It all starts in Hamburg, Germany, where Otto Lidenbrock, a famous scientist discovers a secret map going to the center of earth. He then decides to leave with his nephew, Axel. After packing instruments and food they head to IceLand, where they'll go down a volcano to then travel lots of miles. After leaving Hamburg and le Sunday 3 May A Journey to the Center of the Earth is book written by the French author, Jules Verne. After reading it in two languages, the novel turns out to be really good. It all starts in Hamburg, Germany, where Otto Lidenbrock, a famous scientist discovers a secret map going to the center of earth. He then decides to leave with his nephew, Axel. After packing instruments and food they head to IceLand, where they'll go down a volcano to then travel lots of miles. After leaving Hamburg and leaving the house, Axel and his uncle headed by train to Copenhagen, where they'll take a boat to head to IceLand. The trip happens during summer so it's hot out, and Axel thinks it's crazy to got inside the Volcano, because it's going to be even more hot. After few days of voyage, Lidenbrock and his nephew sleep at a hotel, where they meet the guide, that will walk them through the Volcano's heart. Few days after they were gone to IceLand. Otto had a hard time sleeping in the boat since he was sick. He was vomiting and had nauseous feelings. After arriving, Otto talked with other scientists, and he also talked about why this tip was organized. He learned that the message found was written by an author killed because she was thought to be insane, and that it was bad to the people of IceLand. So they were gone, after few days of walking and hiking, the guide found a home where the group could rest. The following day, they could leave and start going up the volcano. After they finished hiking, they had to go down. So, after few days of rest, they went down the volcano, and started counting the distance traveled from the starting point. Axel has realized that, for each mile they went down, the temperature would rise up two degrees. After few miles in the volcano, the group found out that the way to the center of earth was heading South-West, meaning that at one point they would leave IceLand to go somewhere else. 10 May, 2015 After leaving IceLand, Otto, the guide, and his nephew, traveled lots of miles. Then at some point realized that they were few mile under Copenhagen. The group started feeling bad, were soon out of water, which was a bad thing since they were miles underground. "'A torrent? I said'"(Verne 208). The guide started digging for water, and at some point found it. Axel was feeling so dizzy, he jumped into the fountain, but then shouted because the water was boiling. So Axel had to stay underground with second degree burns on the skin. The water started forming a fountain following the group. They then decided to keep on moving and pack some water for the days they'll need some. After walking miles and miles, the water wasn't following anymore, and Axel realized that they were heading the wrong way, and that they had to go back to where the water was."'Lost'"(Verne 236). So they had to walk miles back and waste some food to survive, and all of that because of the compass and the map. So they did it, and saw the water again. They then walked back in the good direction, and Otto decided to take one day of rest. The following day, the group was resting, and Axel is commentating the fact he hasn't even been worried about leave in a hurry at 6 AM. "'Let's take a break'"(Verne 243). So they then rested and relaxed for a full day, all knowing that the following day, they will have to leave in a hurry again. The following day they left and walked until they found out there was a sea, which they needed a boat to go through it. So they let the guide build one, and slept next to this underground lake. The day after that, they have left, what they called Port-Grauben, named after Axel's girlfriend. They've also named the sea after the scientist, Lidenbrock. They left and miles and miles of water came before their eyes. "'It's has been hundreds of miles we have traveled from Port-Grauben'"(Verne).They have traveled hundreds of miles, and Axel has realized that they were under Hamburg, where they left everything to go explore what's happening under earth's crust. Eventually a storm has been introduced to them. They were noes in risk of living the surface of Earth to go someplace else.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I started this after I had finished The Illiad; after I had slogged though everything H.P. Lovecraft had ever written; after I had read Sherlock and Watson solve every puzzle thrown at them, and I still wasn't ready for the monstrosity that is the Jules Verne Collection: 33 Works. I'm reviewing this while still reading it. I've been reading it for (more than? over?) a year. Like some reviewers, they took breaks between stories - I've since replenished my reading fatigue on Octavia Butler's Parab I started this after I had finished The Illiad; after I had slogged though everything H.P. Lovecraft had ever written; after I had read Sherlock and Watson solve every puzzle thrown at them, and I still wasn't ready for the monstrosity that is the Jules Verne Collection: 33 Works. I'm reviewing this while still reading it. I've been reading it for (more than? over?) a year. Like some reviewers, they took breaks between stories - I've since replenished my reading fatigue on Octavia Butler's Parable of the Sower and Tasmyn Muir's Gideon the Ninth - but this collection of stories from one of the founders of science fiction is not for the faint of heart. These stories are not short; they are not light mental apertifs. The long ones are verbose and dated; the shorter ones are dense and technical. These are proper science fiction novels, and I never knew that until I picked this collection up, as I had never read his popularized stories before now. I understand why people adapt Verne's works into plays or movies: his world building is immaculate. I have a very distinct idea of Nemo's submarine and a mental topographical map of Lincoln Island. He describes everything in detail, down to the horses. This does lead to exhaustion and a feeling that one will never get through a chapter in a reasonable amount of time, because you're too busy reading an encyclopedic list of all of the fish in every sea that was known to man in the 1890s. However, it has its moments of spark; there are still moments of danger and excitement: I was truly stressed out reading The Fur Country and The Survivors of the Chancellor. From a technical standpoint, the electronic edition is clunky, and did affect the rating. Because of the format, the progression tracker is thrown off; I've been at 47% for most of the year, even when starting new stories, and the page numbers can't be properly identified by my Kindle. I'm a rewards-based person, so watching the "time left to finish a book" is always a good motivator for me to keep reading (I wolfed down Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in exactly 5h55m because I wanted to beat my own estimated read time of 6h) so it's been really demotivating at times to still be at the 40 hour mark when I'm completing entire books. Besides the density of the text and the format of the electronic edition, I feel like it's a great addition to my library of "Classical Things I Read Before My Memory Went to Hell", and it's good for anyone who has a similar one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    C

    I read the entire collection when i was about 12-14 years old. A delight for any adventure, mystery and SF lover. each story, apart from the three main genre features mentioned above, praises the spirit of freedom,courage and fight personified in Verne s ultimate great characters.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    20,000 Leauges Under The Sea: I have never seen the movie, tho now, having read the book, I will most definetly go out and rent it. I was always under the impression that the whole novel was based on a submarine trip to the bottom of the ocean to fight a gigantic squid... I could not have been more wrong. Verne is quickly becoming a favorite author of mine. While his books get very technically and scientifically descriptive (which makes for a long, hard read), I find myself pulled in and turning p 20,000 Leauges Under The Sea: I have never seen the movie, tho now, having read the book, I will most definetly go out and rent it. I was always under the impression that the whole novel was based on a submarine trip to the bottom of the ocean to fight a gigantic squid... I could not have been more wrong. Verne is quickly becoming a favorite author of mine. While his books get very technically and scientifically descriptive (which makes for a long, hard read), I find myself pulled in and turning pages long into the night. His novels tend to haunt me as I'm reading them, and long after Ive finished. This particular collection, however, has alot of typos, which I find rather grating as I am reading. This novel has caused me to run out and purchase Moby Dick, and also got me to place The Old Man and the Sea high on my list of novels to reread!! ***Update: Journey to the Center of the Earth: Just read this novel, it was pushed up the list of to-reads due to the movie trailer I saw last week ( I like to read the novels before seeing the films) I enjoyed this story (so much less technical than the others I have read). An uncle, nephew, and guide pack up thier belongings and head to Iceland, to follow in the footsteps of a famous traveler to the locate the center of the earth. A few things to mention: Its the nephew who is narrating, and you know in advance that he is narrating after the fact, so the entire time you are reading, you know he doesnt die. The biggest 'eeewwwww' factor for me is the fact that he is in love with his cousin ,and apparently the uncle (to which she is his neice) is ok with this. Ugh! ***UPDATE "Passepartout wept till he was blind, and felt like blowing his brains out." I went my whole life believing this book was about a man who travelled the world in 80 days by way of a hot air balloon (due to the numerous book covers that showed me such). I am confused to say the least, as this novel contained NOT ONE hot air balloon. It did, however, contain many trains, boats, steamers, sledges and even an elephant ride. A story of one eccentric recluse (Phileas Fogg) and his bet with some aquaintences that he should be able to travel the world in 80 days, or leave a large chunk of his fortune to them should he fail. We follow him as he never sweats, worries, or loses his cool,in the company of some of the finest characters , and in the presence of some of the most bizarre and interesting situations it has been my pleasure to read about.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt C.

    The book is decent - it has the Verne stories in it (20,000 Leagues, Journey to the Center of the Earth, Around the world in 80 days, etc.) and is nicely bound and printed. There are some typos, however, and though the illustrations are kind of neat they're clearly artistically done by someone who's never read the descriptions (Hans, the Icelandic guide from Journey, had a "Herculean" build and the illustration shows him as a shorter fattish man). From the Earth to the Moon didn't interest me in The book is decent - it has the Verne stories in it (20,000 Leagues, Journey to the Center of the Earth, Around the world in 80 days, etc.) and is nicely bound and printed. There are some typos, however, and though the illustrations are kind of neat they're clearly artistically done by someone who's never read the descriptions (Hans, the Icelandic guide from Journey, had a "Herculean" build and the illustration shows him as a shorter fattish man). From the Earth to the Moon didn't interest me in the slightest, it talks about making a gun that can shoot a projectile (in this case loaded with men and provisions) to the Moon, kind of dumb, but it's funny to hear a Frenchman from the 1800s describe Americans in the first chapter. Anyway the stories themselves are recommended, but if you're not collecting you might be better off getting the classics in separate books.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fraser

    I have to confess, I didn't read everything here, just the main novels, and not any of the short stories included. Why? I started to tire out of my late Victorian adventurer mode! I thoroughly enjoyed "A Journey to the Interior of the Earth", "20,000 leagues", "The Mysterious Island" etc, but found that this was enough. Going back to my childhood in terms of having wanted to read these books seems like a long long time ago, and it was fun to a point. Verne's novels are very readable, they have dat I have to confess, I didn't read everything here, just the main novels, and not any of the short stories included. Why? I started to tire out of my late Victorian adventurer mode! I thoroughly enjoyed "A Journey to the Interior of the Earth", "20,000 leagues", "The Mysterious Island" etc, but found that this was enough. Going back to my childhood in terms of having wanted to read these books seems like a long long time ago, and it was fun to a point. Verne's novels are very readable, they have dated as one would entirely expect, but hold some interest in terms of getting inside the mind-set of the time they were written in. Trusty man-servants and loyalty issues aside, there are passages still exciting to read as the author revels in telling his fantastic stories. To finish the lot, you have to be a real fan(atic) I would imagine, but certainly worth dipping the toes into.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Mason

    This work was Journey to the Center of the Earth. Just the other day, I realized I had never read it. I loved the old movie and being the reader that I am, I could not believe my neglect. This is the translation of the Jules Verne original and I must say, at times the reading is rough. It was written and translated long ago so some of the words are...confusing as well as sentence structure and meaning. But even through all that I still enjoyed the read. I did find the main character a bit childis This work was Journey to the Center of the Earth. Just the other day, I realized I had never read it. I loved the old movie and being the reader that I am, I could not believe my neglect. This is the translation of the Jules Verne original and I must say, at times the reading is rough. It was written and translated long ago so some of the words are...confusing as well as sentence structure and meaning. But even through all that I still enjoyed the read. I did find the main character a bit childish, whinney and silly and very self centered. I put it down to the day and age that the book was written. An enjoyable classic that I will probably never read again but glad I did read it once. I would recommend to all to read at least once in your lifetime.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Peter Jochinger

    If your looking for adventure then this is a must read. I have read this works in conjunction with the works of H.G.Wells which I also give 5 stars. To sum up for the reader: One is the master of understanding love and romance in the narrative and Jules Verne is the master of adventure and imagination. Travel the continent the way no one else could describe, visit the north pole in detail then journey the jungles of deepest Africa. No land is left untouched absolutely remarkable. Both books are am If your looking for adventure then this is a must read. I have read this works in conjunction with the works of H.G.Wells which I also give 5 stars. To sum up for the reader: One is the master of understanding love and romance in the narrative and Jules Verne is the master of adventure and imagination. Travel the continent the way no one else could describe, visit the north pole in detail then journey the jungles of deepest Africa. No land is left untouched absolutely remarkable. Both books are amazing value, containing endless hours of enjoyment.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    20,000 Leagues Under the Sea - 3.5 stars. This was kind of boring at the beginning, but it got better and more interesting halfway through. Around the World in 80 Days - 4.5 stars. More suspenseful and interesting than 20,000 Leagues. The Blockade Runners - 4 stars. Quick read. From the Earth to the Moon/Round the Moon - I couldn't get into this and decided not to finish it. Four stars average for the 3 I read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angus

    It is a decent collection of his more well known books but his writing is a bit dry in spots as far as scientifically classifying almost every creature he encounters. These are books I wanted to read but now that I have I will most likely not bother to reread them. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and the flying ship one were suspiciously similar.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jay Wright

    This is a selection of readings including 20,000 Leagues under the Sea, Journey to the Center of the Earth, Around the World and 80 Days and others. I read Journey as a teen and it is still good. The best is Around the World. I enjoyed seeing what Verne thought would happen and what is interesting is how much he got right. Classics.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    I have read these stories as a child and teenager now I am rereading them because they were amazing then and still are.

  27. 4 out of 5

    R. C.

    Establishing cultural terms !

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Cloud

    Fabulous mind in an age where man could do anything... the age of savants... the only thing left to read is Vernes Biography. I can't wait!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maria Cunningham

    I loved the adventure!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    I read FROM THE EARTH TO THE MOON...it was EXCELLENT!!! I am amazed at the accuracy even though it was written so long ago!

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