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Letters and Dispatches 1924-1944

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One of the most remarkable and stirring episodes of World War II involved a young Swede from a distinguished banking family named Raoul Wallenberg. Wallenberg had watched the progress of the war and the treatment of the Jews from his neutral country with growing horror and the burning ambition to do something. When in June of 1944 he was approached to oversee a rescue oper One of the most remarkable and stirring episodes of World War II involved a young Swede from a distinguished banking family named Raoul Wallenberg. Wallenberg had watched the progress of the war and the treatment of the Jews from his neutral country with growing horror and the burning ambition to do something. When in June of 1944 he was approached to oversee a rescue operation of Hungarian Jews being deported to the death camps by Adolf Eichmann, he accepted this clearly perilous and probably hopeless mission without hesitation. Hurriedly accorded diplomatic status by his own government, Wallenberg arrived in Budapest in early July of 1944. By the time of his arrest by the Soviet army on January 17, 1945, roughly six months later, he had helped to save the lives of over 100,000 people. Gathering together several elements of Wallenberg's written record, Letters and Dispatches, 1924-1944 marks the fiftieth anniversary of his tragic and still mysterious disappearance and offers some answers. At the heart of this collection is the correspondence between Raoul and his paternal and sternly patrician grandfather Gustaf Wallenberg, who had pledged to support his fatherless grandson so long as Raoul studied and worked outside of Sweden. He urged Raoul to go to America. In the fall of 1931, Raoul matriculated at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor to study architecture and spent four years observing and admiring a country lifting itself up from the depths of the Depression. He also hitchhiked to California, studied New York's skyscrapers, worked at the World's Fair in Chicago, and drove a pickup truck to Mexico City, all the while engaged in a spirited exchange of ideas and impressions with his grandfather. Gustaf's plan was for Raoul to distinguish himself abroad and then, using contacts he himself would supply at the right moment, to go back to Sweden and begin a career. Dutiful though increasingly restless, Raoul obeyed his grandfather's directives and worked in


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One of the most remarkable and stirring episodes of World War II involved a young Swede from a distinguished banking family named Raoul Wallenberg. Wallenberg had watched the progress of the war and the treatment of the Jews from his neutral country with growing horror and the burning ambition to do something. When in June of 1944 he was approached to oversee a rescue oper One of the most remarkable and stirring episodes of World War II involved a young Swede from a distinguished banking family named Raoul Wallenberg. Wallenberg had watched the progress of the war and the treatment of the Jews from his neutral country with growing horror and the burning ambition to do something. When in June of 1944 he was approached to oversee a rescue operation of Hungarian Jews being deported to the death camps by Adolf Eichmann, he accepted this clearly perilous and probably hopeless mission without hesitation. Hurriedly accorded diplomatic status by his own government, Wallenberg arrived in Budapest in early July of 1944. By the time of his arrest by the Soviet army on January 17, 1945, roughly six months later, he had helped to save the lives of over 100,000 people. Gathering together several elements of Wallenberg's written record, Letters and Dispatches, 1924-1944 marks the fiftieth anniversary of his tragic and still mysterious disappearance and offers some answers. At the heart of this collection is the correspondence between Raoul and his paternal and sternly patrician grandfather Gustaf Wallenberg, who had pledged to support his fatherless grandson so long as Raoul studied and worked outside of Sweden. He urged Raoul to go to America. In the fall of 1931, Raoul matriculated at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor to study architecture and spent four years observing and admiring a country lifting itself up from the depths of the Depression. He also hitchhiked to California, studied New York's skyscrapers, worked at the World's Fair in Chicago, and drove a pickup truck to Mexico City, all the while engaged in a spirited exchange of ideas and impressions with his grandfather. Gustaf's plan was for Raoul to distinguish himself abroad and then, using contacts he himself would supply at the right moment, to go back to Sweden and begin a career. Dutiful though increasingly restless, Raoul obeyed his grandfather's directives and worked in

30 review for Letters and Dispatches 1924-1944

  1. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    How Wallenberg grew into a savior Reading the letters from his grandfather to the growing teenager, you can see how he was being prepared to become a great man.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

    Thought that I would not like this book but very much did. Disappointed I won't be at the Book Club meeting to discuss it. Gave a thorough picture of the times in Europe prior to the second world war. Started off portraying the life of Raoul Wallenberg totally using the letters between him and his grandfather. Actually I thought it a pretty self-centered life. But then the story became sketchy as he amazingly protected and rescued thousands of Jews in Sweden at peril to his own life. Luckily ano Thought that I would not like this book but very much did. Disappointed I won't be at the Book Club meeting to discuss it. Gave a thorough picture of the times in Europe prior to the second world war. Started off portraying the life of Raoul Wallenberg totally using the letters between him and his grandfather. Actually I thought it a pretty self-centered life. But then the story became sketchy as he amazingly protected and rescued thousands of Jews in Sweden at peril to his own life. Luckily another member found a good book HIS NAME WAS RAOUL WALLENBERG LOUISE BORDEN which aptly fills in the time blank.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Catharine Ozols

    Fascinating I've been reading this book, off and on, for a while. It complements what I have already read about Raoul Wallenberg in a way that helps you get to know him more personally. It makes me question what I would do if it became necessary to save people. Fascinating I've been reading this book, off and on, for a while. It complements what I have already read about Raoul Wallenberg in a way that helps you get to know him more personally. It makes me question what I would do if it became necessary to save people.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christel

    If you happen to be a Raoul Wallenberg lover, this book gives insight into what his character was. It's more a research help than a poolside read. I appreciated the insight in this collection of his letters because I so deeply admire that hero. If you happen to be a Raoul Wallenberg lover, this book gives insight into what his character was. It's more a research help than a poolside read. I appreciated the insight in this collection of his letters because I so deeply admire that hero.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nan

    This book is a must read. Raoul Wallenberg seems unknown to many people. He was a true hero to the Hungarian Jews.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Peter C. Duthie

  7. 5 out of 5

    Denise

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lucia Luce Quinn

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  10. 4 out of 5

    Harold

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Haake

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Mcbear

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Shapiro

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chantal LeGendre

  16. 4 out of 5

    Albert Randolph

  17. 5 out of 5

    jill coburn

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

  19. 5 out of 5

    G

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mariedupuy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lorrainee

  24. 4 out of 5

    sue young

  25. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  26. 5 out of 5

    Janet Minichiello

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anne

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  29. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Milstead

  30. 4 out of 5

    Arthur Bartram

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