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A Complete Guide to United States Military Medals, 1939 to Present: All Decorations, Service Medals, Ribbons and Commonly Awarded Allied Medals of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard

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The only complete and easy to use color guide of all U.S. Military medals, ribbons, unit awards, devices and commonly presented foreigh medals. Covers all of America's conflicts from World War II to Iraq and Afghanistan. This complete edition is written for vererans, veterans families, active duty, Reserve and National Guard military personnel, collectors and researchers. The only complete and easy to use color guide of all U.S. Military medals, ribbons, unit awards, devices and commonly presented foreigh medals. Covers all of America's conflicts from World War II to Iraq and Afghanistan. This complete edition is written for vererans, veterans families, active duty, Reserve and National Guard military personnel, collectors and researchers. Complete description of each medal, it's criteria, dates of awards, background, symbolism and attachments with front and back views. Color plates of all U.S. Military Decorations, Service Medals, Marksmanship Medals and Ribbons, Foreign Medals and all ribbon only awards. Complete color ribbon display in the correct order of precedence for all awards and ribbons of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard and Merchant Marine since 1939. The most complete chapter on devices for awards and ribbons ever published, describing which devices go with each medal and ribbon (cross-indexed with all medal and ribbon plates). A complete section on wear and display of U.S. Military Awards.


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The only complete and easy to use color guide of all U.S. Military medals, ribbons, unit awards, devices and commonly presented foreigh medals. Covers all of America's conflicts from World War II to Iraq and Afghanistan. This complete edition is written for vererans, veterans families, active duty, Reserve and National Guard military personnel, collectors and researchers. The only complete and easy to use color guide of all U.S. Military medals, ribbons, unit awards, devices and commonly presented foreigh medals. Covers all of America's conflicts from World War II to Iraq and Afghanistan. This complete edition is written for vererans, veterans families, active duty, Reserve and National Guard military personnel, collectors and researchers. Complete description of each medal, it's criteria, dates of awards, background, symbolism and attachments with front and back views. Color plates of all U.S. Military Decorations, Service Medals, Marksmanship Medals and Ribbons, Foreign Medals and all ribbon only awards. Complete color ribbon display in the correct order of precedence for all awards and ribbons of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard and Merchant Marine since 1939. The most complete chapter on devices for awards and ribbons ever published, describing which devices go with each medal and ribbon (cross-indexed with all medal and ribbon plates). A complete section on wear and display of U.S. Military Awards.

15 review for A Complete Guide to United States Military Medals, 1939 to Present: All Decorations, Service Medals, Ribbons and Commonly Awarded Allied Medals of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael Smith

    My father and grandfather were both career army officers, so I grew up surrounded by men in uniform and I became reasonably adept at reading an array of decorations and campaign ribbons (and shoulder patches, which this book doesn’t address), and thereby the wearer’s military career. This large-format color volume has become the recognized authoritative source, yet the information it presents is concise and accurate. After a brief introduction to the early history of American military decoration My father and grandfather were both career army officers, so I grew up surrounded by men in uniform and I became reasonably adept at reading an array of decorations and campaign ribbons (and shoulder patches, which this book doesn’t address), and thereby the wearer’s military career. This large-format color volume has become the recognized authoritative source, yet the information it presents is concise and accurate. After a brief introduction to the early history of American military decorations (pre-World War I, that is), it begins at the top of the honors pyramid with the Medal of Honor in its three forms, the Distinguished Service Cross, the Purple Heart, and on down to the lower-lever personal decorations. Then it considers the special service, good conduct, and other “merit” awards. Finally comes the much larger collection of service and campaign medals, from China and the Philippines through Afghanistan and Iraq. For each item, you’ll find the date the award was instituted, the personal or unit criteria, and which branches it applies to. Additional devices (usually for additional awards) are described at some length, which most reference sources like this don’t bother with. The limited number of foreign decorations authorized to be worn with the U.S. uniform are also pictured. You’ll also find a detailed manner-of-wear guide. Finally, the growing number of “ribbon only” awards are briefly discussed; these are a result of the Pentagon’s highly questionable policy of “medal inflation,” on the grounds that wearing gongs increases morale. (But a ribbon for passing basic training? Gimme a break.) All in all, this is a useful and inexpensive source for the collector, the student, and the active duty awards officer (and perhaps the army brat).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Noha Mousleh

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kobus Van Der Westhuizen

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ander

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Corpuz-Jaeger

  6. 5 out of 5

    Barioni

  7. 4 out of 5

    Meleana

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Spencer

  9. 5 out of 5

    james lazenby

  10. 5 out of 5

    Coy Rahman

  11. 5 out of 5

    Phobos

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zaali David

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steve A. Weiden

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  15. 5 out of 5

    Roger

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