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Make: AVR Programming: Learning to Write Software for Hardware (Make : Technology on Your Time)

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Atmel's AVR microcontrollers are the chips that power Arduino, and are the go-to chip for many hobbyist and hardware hacking projects. In this book you'll set aside the layers of abstraction provided by the Arduino environment and learn how to program AVR microcontrollers directly. In doing so, you'll get closer to the chip and you'll be able to squeeze more power and feat Atmel's AVR microcontrollers are the chips that power Arduino, and are the go-to chip for many hobbyist and hardware hacking projects. In this book you'll set aside the layers of abstraction provided by the Arduino environment and learn how to program AVR microcontrollers directly. In doing so, you'll get closer to the chip and you'll be able to squeeze more power and features out of it. Each chapter of this book is centered around projects that incorporate that particular microcontroller topic. Each project includes schematics, code, and illustrations of a working project. Program a range of AVR chips Extend and re-use other people’s code and circuits Interface with USB, I2C, and SPI peripheral devices Learn to access the full range of power and speed of the microcontroller Build projects including Cylon Eyes, a Square-Wave Organ, an AM Radio, a Passive Light-Sensor Alarm, Temperature Logger, and more Understand what's happening behind the scenes even when using the Arduino IDE


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Atmel's AVR microcontrollers are the chips that power Arduino, and are the go-to chip for many hobbyist and hardware hacking projects. In this book you'll set aside the layers of abstraction provided by the Arduino environment and learn how to program AVR microcontrollers directly. In doing so, you'll get closer to the chip and you'll be able to squeeze more power and feat Atmel's AVR microcontrollers are the chips that power Arduino, and are the go-to chip for many hobbyist and hardware hacking projects. In this book you'll set aside the layers of abstraction provided by the Arduino environment and learn how to program AVR microcontrollers directly. In doing so, you'll get closer to the chip and you'll be able to squeeze more power and features out of it. Each chapter of this book is centered around projects that incorporate that particular microcontroller topic. Each project includes schematics, code, and illustrations of a working project. Program a range of AVR chips Extend and re-use other people’s code and circuits Interface with USB, I2C, and SPI peripheral devices Learn to access the full range of power and speed of the microcontroller Build projects including Cylon Eyes, a Square-Wave Organ, an AM Radio, a Passive Light-Sensor Alarm, Temperature Logger, and more Understand what's happening behind the scenes even when using the Arduino IDE

54 review for Make: AVR Programming: Learning to Write Software for Hardware (Make : Technology on Your Time)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Neeraj Adhikari

    Writers of 'for beginners' books take note, because this is how all 'for beginners' books should be. For a long time, I have had a fascination with hardware programming. As a garden variety application programmer, my work and hobby projects didn't provide me with much opportunity to interact with the world other than through the confines of a screen. Sometimes it was background code, running on my computer or in a server far away, doing work that was serious but so intangible. I wanted see my cod Writers of 'for beginners' books take note, because this is how all 'for beginners' books should be. For a long time, I have had a fascination with hardware programming. As a garden variety application programmer, my work and hobby projects didn't provide me with much opportunity to interact with the world other than through the confines of a screen. Sometimes it was background code, running on my computer or in a server far away, doing work that was serious but so intangible. I wanted see my code move things, blink lights, control devices, make things happen. And what I feel now is that I picked the right book to learn how to do all of that. The author has the appropriate level of enthusiasm (which is, a lot of it) for what he is teaching, and he does an excellent job of imparting that enthusiasm to the reader. I had fun reading the book, right from the first page. It also helps that his sense of humor is on point. So if you want to get started on programming microcontrollers and want to play with hardware, grab this book and start reading. The best way to read this book is, as it itself prescribes, to build and program along with the book, chapter by chapter. As I had already started a project on my own, I didn't do that and missed out on some of the fun. The book is meant to be read by people who either have hardware experience but not a lot of software experience or vice versa. As a consequence of that, people from either background will find some portions tedious and skippable. But that is minor enough to not affect the 5-star rating I give this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michal Angelo

    This is one of those funny 'tools' that you keep on your work-bench and use infrequently but are always happy it is there. Whereas Programming and Customizing the AVR Microcontroller is the natural predicate displaying how the AVR is made, Make:AVR shows you how to fully utilize its capabilities. Analog/Digital I/O & conversions, motor control, SPI, I2C, and memory. My volume is all marked-up with notes, stickies, and dog-eared pages--looks like it took several rides on the floor of the bus. This is one of those funny 'tools' that you keep on your work-bench and use infrequently but are always happy it is there. Whereas Programming and Customizing the AVR Microcontroller is the natural predicate displaying how the AVR is made, Make:AVR shows you how to fully utilize its capabilities. Analog/Digital I/O & conversions, motor control, SPI, I2C, and memory. My volume is all marked-up with notes, stickies, and dog-eared pages--looks like it took several rides on the floor of the bus.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark Moran

    Really useful book. Well written, fun, and packs a lot of great tips for programming AVR micro controllers into one place.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brian Salehi

    If you want a fun journey of programming AVR micro controllers and also want to dive into the field, this is a right book to read. Williams kept the text fun to read and made projects practical and fun to do. Some topics might not be fully covered, though. I was looking to use WiFi with AVR micro, I didn't catch anything here. But the rest of topics are covered effectively. If you want a fun journey of programming AVR micro controllers and also want to dive into the field, this is a right book to read. Williams kept the text fun to read and made projects practical and fun to do. Some topics might not be fully covered, though. I was looking to use WiFi with AVR micro, I didn't catch anything here. But the rest of topics are covered effectively.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tauno Erik

    A great book for a beginner and everyone who likes Arduino.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Arash

    Great Book, helped me get over the line from Arduino programmer to AVR programer. The included project starter code is especially helpful.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hielke Bezemer

    *Note to self: I'll have to re-read it again and then test the code with my arduino. (So the theory will stick) *Note to self: I'll have to re-read it again and then test the code with my arduino. (So the theory will stick)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Good reference.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    I have not given up on AVRs yet (8 bit wonders that they are) but I'm focusing most of my attention on ARM Cortex M* nowadays so I'm putting this book on hold. I will definitely pick it up again soon. I have not given up on AVRs yet (8 bit wonders that they are) but I'm focusing most of my attention on ARM Cortex M* nowadays so I'm putting this book on hold. I will definitely pick it up again soon.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Lowther

    Good book for those that are wanting to move past the Arduino and understand the underlying microcontroller. I have referenced back to this book many times as I'm working my way through my own projects. Good book for those that are wanting to move past the Arduino and understand the underlying microcontroller. I have referenced back to this book many times as I'm working my way through my own projects.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    Too project-oriented. Gets you over the hump of going from Arduino to a standalone chip and avr-gcc/avrdude, but after that nothing you couldn't have figured out from datasheets. I also wish it had spent some time on AVR assembly. Too project-oriented. Gets you over the hump of going from Arduino to a standalone chip and avr-gcc/avrdude, but after that nothing you couldn't have figured out from datasheets. I also wish it had spent some time on AVR assembly.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    629.89 W7228 2013

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kai Tillman

  14. 5 out of 5

    John

  15. 5 out of 5

    Giovanni Mazzocco

  16. 4 out of 5

    Demetrius

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joey

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Berger

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dee

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Veleber

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  23. 4 out of 5

    Helane M. Folske

  24. 4 out of 5

    Fabrizio

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  26. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Brown

  27. 5 out of 5

    ash

  28. 5 out of 5

    João Dinis Ferreira

  29. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jérôme Bernard

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    Laura Escudé

  32. 4 out of 5

    Joseph II

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    Eugene Mah

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    Tom Lee

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    Shadi Traboulsi

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    John Montgomery

  37. 5 out of 5

    Dee

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    Volesi

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    Patrick DiJusto

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    Jean

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    Jay

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    Dominik Paľo

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    André Ribeiro dos Santos

  44. 4 out of 5

    Narmadha Lakshmanan

  45. 5 out of 5

    David

  46. 4 out of 5

    Kapilesh

  47. 4 out of 5

    Gregg A.

  48. 4 out of 5

    Javad

  49. 5 out of 5

    Rpkarthikece

  50. 5 out of 5

    Dan Johnson

  51. 5 out of 5

    Allen Roshan

  52. 4 out of 5

    Thiago

  53. 4 out of 5

    Sam Hassell

  54. 5 out of 5

    Lauro Perez

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