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Big, burly, lascivious, and soft around the edges: welcome to the hypermasculine world of Japanese gay manga. Massive: Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It is the first English-language anthology of its kind: an in-depth introduction to nine of the most exciting comic artists making work for a gay male audience in Japan. Jiraiya, Seizoh Ebisubashi, and Kazuhide Ichikaw Big, burly, lascivious, and soft around the edges: welcome to the hypermasculine world of Japanese gay manga. Massive: Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It is the first English-language anthology of its kind: an in-depth introduction to nine of the most exciting comic artists making work for a gay male audience in Japan. Jiraiya, Seizoh Ebisubashi, and Kazuhide Ichikawa are three of the irresistibly seductive, internationally renowned artists featured in Massive, as well as Gengoroh Tagame, the subject of The Passion of Gengoroh Tagame: Master of Gay Erotic Manga. Get to know each of these artists intimately, through candid interviews, photography, context-providing essays, illustrations, and manga. Massive also includes the groundbreaking, titillating work of gay manga luminaries Takeshi Matsu, Fumi Miyabi, Inu Yoshi, Gai Mizuki, and comic essayist Kumada Poohsuke.


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Big, burly, lascivious, and soft around the edges: welcome to the hypermasculine world of Japanese gay manga. Massive: Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It is the first English-language anthology of its kind: an in-depth introduction to nine of the most exciting comic artists making work for a gay male audience in Japan. Jiraiya, Seizoh Ebisubashi, and Kazuhide Ichikaw Big, burly, lascivious, and soft around the edges: welcome to the hypermasculine world of Japanese gay manga. Massive: Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It is the first English-language anthology of its kind: an in-depth introduction to nine of the most exciting comic artists making work for a gay male audience in Japan. Jiraiya, Seizoh Ebisubashi, and Kazuhide Ichikawa are three of the irresistibly seductive, internationally renowned artists featured in Massive, as well as Gengoroh Tagame, the subject of The Passion of Gengoroh Tagame: Master of Gay Erotic Manga. Get to know each of these artists intimately, through candid interviews, photography, context-providing essays, illustrations, and manga. Massive also includes the groundbreaking, titillating work of gay manga luminaries Takeshi Matsu, Fumi Miyabi, Inu Yoshi, Gai Mizuki, and comic essayist Kumada Poohsuke.

30 review for Massive: Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    I love the physical production qualities of the book. The binding is solid and there's plenty of color. The artist interviews are excellent. I appreciate the list of artist websites for each contributor, as sometimes with Japanese mangaka it's actually really hard to find their site among fan and scanlation sites. The stories were a mixed bag, for me, as happens with any anthology. I did think the Gengoroh Tagame story was a less-good choice, because it's an excerpt from a longer work, and he ha I love the physical production qualities of the book. The binding is solid and there's plenty of color. The artist interviews are excellent. I appreciate the list of artist websites for each contributor, as sometimes with Japanese mangaka it's actually really hard to find their site among fan and scanlation sites. The stories were a mixed bag, for me, as happens with any anthology. I did think the Gengoroh Tagame story was a less-good choice, because it's an excerpt from a longer work, and he has so many amazing short stories that would have been a better pick. This story was squarely Not My Thing (I don't like prison stories, or war stories, and the MC is a prisoner of war. Seeing as how I bought this for Gengoroh Tagame, you can picture my face on reading). However Caveman Guu by Jiraiya was great, and Mr. Tokugawa: Grade 5 Room 4 Homeroom Teacher by Seizoh Ebisubashi . . . this was awesome! I love the unconventional, playful narration, the language, the lush description of scents and sounds. The book also contains a plea for scanlaters to contact artists to ask if they may help promote their work by scanlating. I read scanlations. My argument is that I will buy in English the second the books are available, but apparently publishers don't follow the same logic. So, yeah, I learnt quite a bit of stuff from this book. Also, Jiraiya - his men are so delicious. Yum. ETA: How the hell did this get through the publication process without anyone telling Anne Ishii that it is not Dr. Who, for god's sake, it is Doctor Who.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    I can't say enough good things about this new wave of English translations of gay erotic manga. I've been "reading" this stuff for decades now, but can finally know what they're saying. This book is an introduction to 8 influential manga artists, including interviews, samples of work. and context context context. hurrah! I can't say enough good things about this new wave of English translations of gay erotic manga. I've been "reading" this stuff for decades now, but can finally know what they're saying. This book is an introduction to 8 influential manga artists, including interviews, samples of work. and context context context. hurrah!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Luke Reynolds

    Being gay, finding this collection at my local library instantly piqued my interest. Yes, it's a little racier than much of the content I typically read, but I'm more versed in BL manga, which is primarily written by straight women for straight women. This manga I'm more familiar with does have a gay audience, but because of the cultural framing surrounding homosexuality in Japan, a lot of interactions in BL and even in the gay manga here revolve around an explicit lack of consent. Homosexuality Being gay, finding this collection at my local library instantly piqued my interest. Yes, it's a little racier than much of the content I typically read, but I'm more versed in BL manga, which is primarily written by straight women for straight women. This manga I'm more familiar with does have a gay audience, but because of the cultural framing surrounding homosexuality in Japan, a lot of interactions in BL and even in the gay manga here revolve around an explicit lack of consent. Homosexuality is still frowned upon in Japan, viewed as forbidden and dirty. But the men of stories still want to do it and express themselves that way. It usually involves a seme forcing himself on an uke in BL, the result a scene more akin to assault than sex. But bashing that isn't going to do much; that would be ethnocentric and disregard the fact that for BL narratives, women are writing them to escape the patriarchal labels forced upon them by men. In my mind, as long as these gay stories are handled well by women, I will respect them whether in manga or print, but if they read like MF romances, that's where things get dicey. I digress, though. This collection follows gay manga written by gay artists, and like I mentioned before, it still has those elements BL carries (in fact, some of the authors in this collection started in BL circuits). However, because these are men who identify the way I do writing this content, I relate to it more, which is why I gravitated toward this collection. The editors did a nice job of putting together a book officially recognizing the hard work that goes into this genre, and despite the racy content and my mixed opinions on some of the stories, it was worth the read. Gengoroh Tagame: "Do You Remember South Island P.O.W. Camp?"-3.5 out of 5 stars: The man who has been heralded to be the pioneer of gay manga in Japan, this compelling narrative of the commander of a Japanese regiment lieutenant with a soldier dying of malaria and the master-servant relationship he undertakes with the American caretaker in order to get the soldier's quinine for medicine leans heavily into BDSM, watersports, and dubious consent, which isn't necessarily my thing, but I'm not going to be ethnocentric or hate on it because it represents gay culture in Japan and every person is going to have their own kinks (also, it'd be really dumb to dismiss it like that and insulting to the artist). This is only an excerpt, and I would be curious to see how this ends up and whether the relationship with its unhealthy start could reach a happier place. It wouldn't excuse the dubious start here, but Tagame's great art and use of narrative has me curious. Inu Yoshi: "Kandagawa-kun"-4 out of 5 stars: This was very funny and adorable. A twenty-three-year-old man who's been recently dumped, Masami, receives a package in the mail from winning a raffle at the gay bookstore. It's revealed to be the mildly erotic helper, a humanoid named Kandagawa, and from there, the bewilderment from Masami keeps growing. The lingering feelings of heartbreak from his relationship alongside some truly humorous moments and cute art honoring the husky men out there, both muscular and not, made this really sweet, so I'll be curious to check out some of Yoshi's other work. He seems to be a really sincere artist based on his interview. Kumada Poohsuke: "Dreams of the New Century Theatre Issue #1"-3 out of 5 stars: This excerpt from a collection of four-panel strips had some good and funny gay sex gags, but I unfortunately didn't like the chibi-inspired art style. "With All Your Might"-1 out of 5 stars: Well... Takeshi Matsu: "Kannai's Dilemma"-3 out of 5 stars: Matsu's art was the highlight of this story for me. Kannai's hobby of drawing mash-ups, pieces where you create nudes or semi-nudes and put them against real people, for unconverted by a transfer student who took a special interest with them, and it was a short and cute story that while not leaving the largest impression on me, I did enjoy it. Jiraiya: "Caveman Guu"-3 out of 5 stars: A caveman who has sex with men wants kids, but only women can be impregnated. His shock of finding this out and having sex with a woman is quickly derailed by his sexual desire for men and dominating them. This was good for a laugh, and I liked the art, but much like the last entry in this collection, this didn't leave a large impression on me. Also, there was a lack of consent. Gai Mizuki: "Fantasy and Jump Rope"-3.5 out of 5 stars: Who knew hypnosis and jump rope would ever go hand-in-hand? The art was great in this one (I really liked the character designs), and although the hypnosis leads to, in my mind, a pretty clear showcasing of lack of consent, this sets up a particularly interesting narrative (Mizuki's interview says that this is a prequel to a longer series) and was pretty entertaining. Fumi Miyabi: "Tengudake"-2.5 out of 5 stars: Can someone say hallucinations? Gonna love when most of your characters in a sex scene are tripping on mushrooms! I wasn't particularly invested in the art, but I did like the story of a tengu coming to a village and learning his lesson of what happens when you mess with people you're supposed to trust (albeit this lesson does end in a rape scene where everyone is high on mushrooms). Seizoh Ebisubashi: "Mr. Tokugawa"-2 out of 5 stars: The narration for this one-shot was very erotic, although its euphemisms and synonyms left me feeling more uncomfortable and amused than invested in a threesome scene in a school hallway during class involving a married fifth-grade homeroom teacher, a janitor, and a father of a student at the school. The art was the strongest part of this tale, and other than that, I didn't particularly like this one. Kazuhide Ichikawa: "Yakuza Godfathers"-4 out of 5 stars: This story involved hypnosis that a doctor applied on two rival yakuza clan leaders that led to them making love. The art was strong, the story was the right amount of absurd and humorous and interesting, and I ended up surprisingly really liking this one. Before Reading: And I oop. In all honesty, though, this subject is going to really fascinate me as a gay man, so might as well just have this on my TBR for the future.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Cayes

    Very interesting exploration of gay manga culture that focuses more specifically on the erotic gay manga intended for a male audience. The book is helpful for those not so acquainted with the material, providing a good amount of introduction. There is also a brief timeline of significant male-male events in Japan. An essay accompanies each short story in this anthology to discuss the career of the mangaka and the context, history, and intentions of his work. The artists themselves speak to the m Very interesting exploration of gay manga culture that focuses more specifically on the erotic gay manga intended for a male audience. The book is helpful for those not so acquainted with the material, providing a good amount of introduction. There is also a brief timeline of significant male-male events in Japan. An essay accompanies each short story in this anthology to discuss the career of the mangaka and the context, history, and intentions of his work. The artists themselves speak to the makers of the book about their work, their history, what their goals are for their work, and work in the future. The artists give their insights into the current state and the future of the industry, going behind the scenes revealing a lot about the structure of different editor-artist relationships and fan interactions. Nearly every one of the artists featured here discusses the issue of online piracy of their work, especially from foreign sources. It is interesting to see the different opinions of a sample of gay erotic manga's top artists. That being said, if you do not want to read some explicit gay sex stories, do not read this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    vostendrasamigosyotengolibros

    I feel that the whole book was really a lot about rape "fantasy" but knowing hentai, is mostly the dynamic that it has, you know like that they don't want it until they show them but that's alright because they secretly want it all the time, seriously stop that's rape culture and I like BDSM but some people just used it like an excuse to abuse people (believe me I've been there) so I think that this book do more damage than good. I feel that the whole book was really a lot about rape "fantasy" but knowing hentai, is mostly the dynamic that it has, you know like that they don't want it until they show them but that's alright because they secretly want it all the time, seriously stop that's rape culture and I like BDSM but some people just used it like an excuse to abuse people (believe me I've been there) so I think that this book do more damage than good.

  6. 4 out of 5

    John

    For me this book mostly failed as erotica, largely because I'm not interested in sadomasochism, watersports, mind control, or rape, and I don't have a foot fetish. I don't mind that other people have those kinks--provided it's between consenting adults I really don't give a damn [which, yes, means I'm not in favor of rape. I'm just full of radical opinions]--but unfortunately those kinks are in about half the sections, so that's half the book that already isn't speaking to me (or, in the case of For me this book mostly failed as erotica, largely because I'm not interested in sadomasochism, watersports, mind control, or rape, and I don't have a foot fetish. I don't mind that other people have those kinks--provided it's between consenting adults I really don't give a damn [which, yes, means I'm not in favor of rape. I'm just full of radical opinions]--but unfortunately those kinks are in about half the sections, so that's half the book that already isn't speaking to me (or, in the case of the Gengoroh Tagame excerpt, is actively disturbing me). Where the book does work is in its interviews with the authors and artists, and in its exploration of gay culture in Japan. Unfortunately the interviews tend to be fairly short (two to four pages, with half of each page taken up by artwork) and the discussion of gay culture in Japan could be much deeper--I think mostly what I learned is that the term "bara" is both outdated and still offensive to some people (roughly equivalent to "pansy"), that homosexuality used to be an accepted part of Japanese society up until the Meiji Restoration and the increasing influence of the West on Japanese society, that boys' love stories tend to focus on twinks and are typically written by women for women, and that gay manga with burlier men is typically written by men for men. Also, the gay subculture in Japan is riddled with cliques. (In that regard I'd say it's much like the gay subculture in the USA.) I also learned that the authors did not use a spellchecker on their manuscript. "Athelete" is not a word; Mishima is not "atheletic"; and no one has ever said anything "self-depricatingly." Likewise "literatrue" is not a word, though I thank the authors for the idea of "literafalse," which I'm assuming would be a term for fabricated nonfiction.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Geoff

    My Recommendation: Obviously you shouldn't read this if male-male sex makes you uncomfortable. The images are graphic, but the essays are incredibly informative about the artists, their work styles, and their inspirations. I found some of the artists styles much more approachable and appealing than others, but overall it was a fascinating read and new experience. If you're open to it I would recommend it, but again keep in mind the warning on the back cover: ADULT CONTENT. My Response: Don't worr My Recommendation: Obviously you shouldn't read this if male-male sex makes you uncomfortable. The images are graphic, but the essays are incredibly informative about the artists, their work styles, and their inspirations. I found some of the artists styles much more approachable and appealing than others, but overall it was a fascinating read and new experience. If you're open to it I would recommend it, but again keep in mind the warning on the back cover: ADULT CONTENT. My Response: Don't worry, I'm going to keep this response PG even though this book is definitely X-rated! I can't remember where I first heard about this book, but when I did I remember flagging it to look into. I'm not a big Manga reader or erotica reader for that matter, but when I found out there was an entire genre of manga dedicated to larger gay men I thought it sounded interesting. It is read like a normal manga from right to left and thankfully my earlier dabbling with Jane Austen manga adaptations helped prepare me for that. Two things to note, the word "erotic" was replaced with "Japanese" for some reason in the US Library of Congress' database and m cover has a different beefy man on it, also drawn by Jiraiya. Click here to continue reading on my blog The Oddness of Moving Things.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Evan Wachowski

    An incredible resource for a genre that’s often misunderstood and misrepresented. The oral history of gay manga through the eyes of gengoroh tagame is an invaluable insight into the mind of a master of his craft. Tagame’s short story featured in the book is one of intense domination and humiliation with a rare absence of the hyper-explicit illustrated intercourse that are often the highlight of his stories. Despite this, the scenes presented by tagame just ooze intensity and male lust. I came to An incredible resource for a genre that’s often misunderstood and misrepresented. The oral history of gay manga through the eyes of gengoroh tagame is an invaluable insight into the mind of a master of his craft. Tagame’s short story featured in the book is one of intense domination and humiliation with a rare absence of the hyper-explicit illustrated intercourse that are often the highlight of his stories. Despite this, the scenes presented by tagame just ooze intensity and male lust. I came to this book for tagame’s work and was not disappointed. While tagame’s work may have been my primary reason for seeking this book out, I’d be remiss to ignore the work of the other fantastic artists featured in this book. Many of the other stories in this book feature a lightheartedness and sense of humor that’s nearly always absent from tagame’s work, and they make for a fun read that I can’t recommend enough. This book is a wonderful and fascinating look into the history of gay manga and yaoi, as well as a collection of works that are undeniably sexy. I was totally blown away by the quality of this book, and I now consider it a must-own for anyone interested in gay manga or gay culture in Japan.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro Sierra

    Una excelente muestra del desarrollo del manga gay y su impacto en la sociedad japonesa. Tiene muestras de los trabajos de varios artistas y son geniales!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Inskeep

    While not every mangaka collected herein is my cup of tea, this collection of gay erotic manga, the first ever published in English, couldn’t be more important. Jiraiya-san is a particular favorite of mine.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Louie Jordan

    Amazing insight into the evolution of modern Japanese gay erotica and also a glimpse into its gay culture. Saw this book while on holiday in Japan and saved up for the English translation when I got back. Absolutely worth it!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tristan Stewart

    This opened the door for gay manga for me. I was interested in this after reading My Brothers Husband. Loved that they included a variety of artistic styles and the interviews with the authors were super compelling.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bayriel Dudeq

    How to read this online?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    1.5? i mostly enjoyed reading about gay manga and gay history in japan but the actual erotica was.. bad. cw for rape, among other things

  15. 4 out of 5

    Roxana Chirilă

    5 stars for the idea of writing this book, for going there and interviewing authors, for writing a short history of gay literature and manga in Japan, for telling us more about the authors' backgrounds, whether they can make a living out of this, where there stories get sold and so on. Personally, I'm not into gay porn with "massive" men. Actually, I'm not into Japanese gay porn at all, whether it has big, burly fellows or pretty, pretty boys. (I prefer normal guys) However, reading the samples o 5 stars for the idea of writing this book, for going there and interviewing authors, for writing a short history of gay literature and manga in Japan, for telling us more about the authors' backgrounds, whether they can make a living out of this, where there stories get sold and so on. Personally, I'm not into gay porn with "massive" men. Actually, I'm not into Japanese gay porn at all, whether it has big, burly fellows or pretty, pretty boys. (I prefer normal guys) However, reading the samples offered in this book was a lot of fun. They were chosen from all over the spectrum - serious stories, funny stories, unlikely stories, joyful stories. Some of them might not be everyone's thing (I sure as hell didn't get the 4-panel ones, maybe they just don't work well outside Japan), but they're interesting to read side by side. Also, some of the scenes were memorable and utterly hilarious - the joy of a teacher dancing half-naked on empty school corridors will stick with me for a long time. The bio part for each author contained quotes from interviews with them, carefully used to illustrate a certain idea or point of view - I would have been interested in seeing longer transcripts from those interviews, but I guess that would have made the book more, well, massive. Although I don't see why that would be a bad thing; I may not like my men bulky, but I don't mind that trait in books. Overall, fun and informative and recommended to people who feel like reading an intro into this topic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cole Jack

    It was great having a collection of mangaka of gay manga compiled in an English language book. I appreciated the separate sections with information on each mangaka and it reminded me of mangaka I have not read in a while--I need to find more works by Inu Yoshi, I haven't read pieces by him in ages. Visually the photographs of the authors, images from their works, and selections from manga were great. The one downside to this collection were the interviews published before each short story. While It was great having a collection of mangaka of gay manga compiled in an English language book. I appreciated the separate sections with information on each mangaka and it reminded me of mangaka I have not read in a while--I need to find more works by Inu Yoshi, I haven't read pieces by him in ages. Visually the photographs of the authors, images from their works, and selections from manga were great. The one downside to this collection were the interviews published before each short story. While the information provided about each author was interesting, the editors chose to summarize these interviews in several pages, with short excerpted quotes from the interviews rather than complete quotations of the mangaka's thoughts. I would have preferred to see the actual complete interview published in the text since you can tell based on the content that each author was asked about their background, their connections to queer communities in Japan, the usage of the word "bara," and their feelings about scanlations.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kelsy

    This anthology is a collection of manga written for a gay male audience and not only showcases the work of some very talented artists, but also presents history, context, and interviews with the artists. While not all of the manga in the volume were to my personal tastes, I found this an incredibly fascinating read, and I really appreciated what the editors set out to do with this collection. I will definitely be looking up works by several of the artists to read in the future. I also enjoyed th This anthology is a collection of manga written for a gay male audience and not only showcases the work of some very talented artists, but also presents history, context, and interviews with the artists. While not all of the manga in the volume were to my personal tastes, I found this an incredibly fascinating read, and I really appreciated what the editors set out to do with this collection. I will definitely be looking up works by several of the artists to read in the future. I also enjoyed the timeline at the back of the book, which gives an overview of male-male sexuality in Japan since the 1600s. All-in-all, a really great collection, and one you shouldn't miss if it's a topic of interest.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    IT HAS GAY MANGA STORIES IN IT! I really loved this! I was all skeptical at first because I thought it'd simply be another long durge on how underrepresented gay manga is which, though entirely accurate, is simply not what I cared for at this juncture. Then I heard it actually had stories in it and I thought "okay, let's increase my gay manga collection" since I only have the 3 other volumes presently by Mentiako Itto and Takshi Matsu. And I'm remarkably glad I did. Because the stories inside wer IT HAS GAY MANGA STORIES IN IT! I really loved this! I was all skeptical at first because I thought it'd simply be another long durge on how underrepresented gay manga is which, though entirely accurate, is simply not what I cared for at this juncture. Then I heard it actually had stories in it and I thought "okay, let's increase my gay manga collection" since I only have the 3 other volumes presently by Mentiako Itto and Takshi Matsu. And I'm remarkably glad I did. Because the stories inside were fun and diverse in art styles by varying artists. It also contained some seriously enlightening information on gay manga and their artists which was enlightening and cleared up a few questions I'd been speculating over. So I most assuredly reccomend buying the book! It's great!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marcin

    I'm sad to say I'm rather disappointed by this anthology. The background information and interviews with the artists are the best part of this book and it might be worth reading it just for them. As for the actual manga fragments, well, I only really liked one of them (the disappointingly short excerpt from Takeshi Matsu). For what it's worth, the print quality is excellent. Despite the disappointments I appreciate what this book tries to do: introduce gay erotic manga to a Western audience, and I'm sad to say I'm rather disappointed by this anthology. The background information and interviews with the artists are the best part of this book and it might be worth reading it just for them. As for the actual manga fragments, well, I only really liked one of them (the disappointingly short excerpt from Takeshi Matsu). For what it's worth, the print quality is excellent. Despite the disappointments I appreciate what this book tries to do: introduce gay erotic manga to a Western audience, and I guess I can only hope that works by artists more to my liking will follow.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ilai Ilukka

    I can't appreciate the fact more that this anthology got published and I hope it will pave out the way for gay comics and mangakas to get a hold of the non-japanese market as well. The best thing about this collection for me wasn't even the comics, although they are carefully selected and offer a good variety of the genre, but the interviews with the artists - for the first time I'm able to get a glimpse of what motivates them and how they view themselves as gay japanese men and artists - in eng I can't appreciate the fact more that this anthology got published and I hope it will pave out the way for gay comics and mangakas to get a hold of the non-japanese market as well. The best thing about this collection for me wasn't even the comics, although they are carefully selected and offer a good variety of the genre, but the interviews with the artists - for the first time I'm able to get a glimpse of what motivates them and how they view themselves as gay japanese men and artists - in english.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Saffron

    Fascinating, fun, and very nsfw - basically all i ask of any print media. Shedding a light on the Japanese gay manga scene, Anne Ishii guides us into the lives and work of several prominent artists, providing history, personality, and of course the sample comic pages speak for themselves. A must for anyone with even a passing interest in gay art & culture!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Can you give a book more than 5 stars? As someone who loves graphic novels, manga, and LGBTQ art and erotica, this volume was FANTASTIC! It did a great job of showing the diverse styles of different manga creators as well as teaching the reader about the position of gay erotic fiction in Japanese culture. I highly recommend to anyone interested in LGBTQ graphic novels!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Fascinating examination of gay manga for the big men. Wonderful drawings and stories fill these pages with valuable insight into the creators that one wishes were a little less formula of answers and maybe even having these creators in the same room to discuss their work. Still as an introduction to this style, it's quite incredible and it definitely warrants more exploration. Fascinating examination of gay manga for the big men. Wonderful drawings and stories fill these pages with valuable insight into the creators that one wishes were a little less formula of answers and maybe even having these creators in the same room to discuss their work. Still as an introduction to this style, it's quite incredible and it definitely warrants more exploration.

  24. 5 out of 5

    M

    .

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alexandre

    The history of gay manga and how it has evolved, alongside Japanese culture, is what I found most interesting about this book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Actually strangely enlightening.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elisa

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Casey

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charles Chao

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zyne

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