web site hit counter The Priest with Dirty Clothes: A Timeless Story of God's Love and Forgiveness - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Priest with Dirty Clothes: A Timeless Story of God's Love and Forgiveness

Availability: Ready to download

Based on the story of Joshua the high priest, a priest desperately searches for a way to cleanse his dirty clothes and is sent to the Prince. The Prince offers the perfect gift - his own clothes. A dual story relates a grandfather telling two children about how Jesus cleans and covers their heart.


Compare

Based on the story of Joshua the high priest, a priest desperately searches for a way to cleanse his dirty clothes and is sent to the Prince. The Prince offers the perfect gift - his own clothes. A dual story relates a grandfather telling two children about how Jesus cleans and covers their heart.

30 review for The Priest with Dirty Clothes: A Timeless Story of God's Love and Forgiveness

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Pindak

    A delightful children’s book reflecting the beauty of the gospel in a way that children can understand and bring sweet conversations about the Great Prince who saved us. 💛

  2. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    It is always a joy to come across a book that helps to explain the gospel in a way that children can grasp. This is especially nice when the telling of the story brings to light important and often-neglected aspects of the good news. The Prince with Dirty Clothes is one such book. This little book by R.C. Sproul presents the picture of Christ’s imputed righteousness for the believer. Paralleling the scene in Zechariah 3, Sproul tells the story of a priest whose clothes were too filthy for him It is always a joy to come across a book that helps to explain the gospel in a way that children can grasp. This is especially nice when the telling of the story brings to light important and often-neglected aspects of the good news. The Prince with Dirty Clothes is one such book. This little book by R.C. Sproul presents the picture of Christ’s imputed righteousness for the believer. Paralleling the scene in Zechariah 3, Sproul tells the story of a priest whose clothes were too filthy for him to stand in the presence of the king. The prince, the son of the king, gives the priest his perfect clothes in exchange for the priest’s ruined ones. In this picture, children and grown-ups are reminded of how Jesus not only took the punishment for the sin of Gods’ children, but how he also granted to believers his perfect righteousness by his grace through faith alone. My family enjoyed the book. The story is short and sweet, which allowed my seven-year-old to be able to read the book herself. She grasped the concept very well, and we had a helpful discussion about the story. Also, while I am not one to have an opinion about art, my wife tells me that she is fond of the illustrations in this work. At the end of the book, Sproul includes a set of helpful questions for discussion. Parents and teachers will be able to not only read this story to their little ones, but also use the story as a helpful teaching tool. So, with the approval of my wife and my daughter, I am happy to recommend The Priest with Dirty Clothes to parents, Sunday School teachers, Children’s Church workers, and any who want to share the gospel with young ones. I Would recommend that this story be told alongside The Prince’s Poison Cup in order to give a more full-orbed presentation of the gospel. Putting these two books together will help to display the imputation of Christ’s perfect righteousness (The Priest with Dirty Clothes as well as his penal substitutionary atonement The Prince’s Poison cup).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy

    Among the hundreds of books I have reviewed over the years this is the second time that I reviewed a children’s book (the first was God's Servant Job: A Poem with a Promise). I am reviewing this book because I really enjoyed The Priest with Dirty Clothes by Christian theologian R.C. Sproul. My three little girls who are all pre-school age also enjoyed this book very much and the book has led to deeper conversations about spiritual matters. Sproul bases this story loosely on Zechariah 3:1-5 of Jos Among the hundreds of books I have reviewed over the years this is the second time that I reviewed a children’s book (the first was God's Servant Job: A Poem with a Promise). I am reviewing this book because I really enjoyed The Priest with Dirty Clothes by Christian theologian R.C. Sproul. My three little girls who are all pre-school age also enjoyed this book very much and the book has led to deeper conversations about spiritual matters. Sproul bases this story loosely on Zechariah 3:1-5 of Joshua the High Priest and his unrighteous soiled garments before God’s presence in which Satan stands accusing Him. In Sproul’s story the priest instead is a man name Jonathan who appears before a great king to preach. Of course the story is an allegory of God (the king), Satan (the character Malus whose name seems to be a play on word on “malice”) and Jesus Christ (the Prince). Instead of taking place in heaven in this story the setting is in a kingdom sometime during the middle ages (or at least it was an age of kings, priests and bishops). The story was beautifully written and also beautifully illustrated. The illustrated Justin Gerard did a good job and I love the paintings, the details and expressions of the characters. They capture so much in such limited space. My daughters would ask me about the expressions of the character and it capture the mood of the characters as told in the story very well. The book is quite beautiful, appearing as a nice hardcover with quality glossy pages. The analogies to the Christian faith is wonderful. I also appreciated how in the end of the book there’s a section for parents in which Sproul provides questions and Biblical passages for deeper discussions with one’s kids to help facilitate a deeper understanding of God’s truth. Its beautiful to see how a work of fiction for young children can be so Christ-centered, edifying and evangelistic! I give this a five out of five which of course means I recommend the book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nickida Stephens

    As a parent I think it’s very important to teach your children how to treat people well. I really loved this book because it retold a well know bible story in a way for kids to understand and learn from it. The story is about the priest who had to do a sermon in front of the king. On his way to the castle he fell in a puddle of mud and got dirty. He felt horrible about his clothes and tried to clean him self up. When he couldn’t get clean he still went to the castle to preach his sermon. When he As a parent I think it’s very important to teach your children how to treat people well. I really loved this book because it retold a well know bible story in a way for kids to understand and learn from it. The story is about the priest who had to do a sermon in front of the king. On his way to the castle he fell in a puddle of mud and got dirty. He felt horrible about his clothes and tried to clean him self up. When he couldn’t get clean he still went to the castle to preach his sermon. When he stood in front of the people someone stood up and said something about his clothes. The king asked him about it and he told him how he fell so the king told him to come back when his clothes was clean. He was on a quest to get clean. In this story you learn about how the priest clothes was not just dirty but so was his heart and he needed to get it cleaned. This story broke it down so easily so my kids understand that God sent his son to clean their heart and soul so they can be clean. I liked teaching them that they should treat all people kindly and to help others when they need assistance. In this book they didn’t make any of the story complicated and God was referred to as the Kind and Jesus was the kind and caring Prince. He gave his clothes to the priest as a way of making him clean again. The book wasn’t long and drawn out and in the back it had a guide for parents use to ask questions and teach your children even more. It’s a book I plan to revisit several times when my children are older and they are more aware of the lessons in this book. I also liked all the illustrations from the book. They were creative and told the story of the words on that page. They were just right for children of all ages.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    I loved this book. This was a simple level of teaching the truth of Christ's righteousness imputed to us. I read it to my 2 1/2 year old and he listened intently the few nights I read it. But I had the opportunity to read this to my friends daughter who is about 6, and the discussion questions in the back were fantastic! It really fostered great back and forth questions and answers. Truly every book of RC Sproul I've read thus far have not disappointed. I am grateful to have such biblically sound I loved this book. This was a simple level of teaching the truth of Christ's righteousness imputed to us. I read it to my 2 1/2 year old and he listened intently the few nights I read it. But I had the opportunity to read this to my friends daughter who is about 6, and the discussion questions in the back were fantastic! It really fostered great back and forth questions and answers. Truly every book of RC Sproul I've read thus far have not disappointed. I am grateful to have such biblically sound and rich children's literature.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    It takes a great theologian to write a children's book. Sproul bases this story on Zechariah 3:1-5 and brings it to a child's level to illustrate how Christ covers us in His righteousness. The questions at the end are a helpful guide for parents to continue the discussion with older children. What a beautiful way to introduce children to the deep truths of God. It takes a great theologian to write a children's book. Sproul bases this story on Zechariah 3:1-5 and brings it to a child's level to illustrate how Christ covers us in His righteousness. The questions at the end are a helpful guide for parents to continue the discussion with older children. What a beautiful way to introduce children to the deep truths of God.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

    Beautiful illustrations, with a well told story, but unfortunately very reformed in theology. Which is excellent, since it's written by and for Protestants, but sad because we have to get rid of it. I had to skip over a few paragraphs when reading it to my brothers. It's supposedly told by a Scottish grandfather, so if you can do accents it would make an amazing read-aloud. Beautiful illustrations, with a well told story, but unfortunately very reformed in theology. Which is excellent, since it's written by and for Protestants, but sad because we have to get rid of it. I had to skip over a few paragraphs when reading it to my brothers. It's supposedly told by a Scottish grandfather, so if you can do accents it would make an amazing read-aloud.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tom Brainerd

    This may be the best children's book I have ever read. From time to time I'll gather the kids at church or at our home around me and read it. I have not been able to read it once without tears welling up in my eyes. This may be the best children's book I have ever read. From time to time I'll gather the kids at church or at our home around me and read it. I have not been able to read it once without tears welling up in my eyes.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristie

    One of my favorite children's books of all time! I cried when I read it the first time, and still get teary when I think about it's message of imputation and how beautifully this story is told for children. One of my favorite children's books of all time! I cried when I read it the first time, and still get teary when I think about it's message of imputation and how beautifully this story is told for children.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I previewed this book to read to my children. My only complaint is that I didn't like that the priest got dirty by accident through no fault of his own. I don't think children will realize that is not true in relation to sin. I previewed this book to read to my children. My only complaint is that I didn't like that the priest got dirty by accident through no fault of his own. I don't think children will realize that is not true in relation to sin.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Obviously, the story misses out on a lot of aspects of God's love and forgiveness, and the change that was made when Jesus took our sins, but the allegory is well done for what it is. I appreciate the picture of exchanged clothes, for our exchanged records. Obviously, the story misses out on a lot of aspects of God's love and forgiveness, and the change that was made when Jesus took our sins, but the allegory is well done for what it is. I appreciate the picture of exchanged clothes, for our exchanged records.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Billy Schiel

    This book has blessed my children immensely!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emily Cook

    Nice illustration of wearing Christ's righteousness for kids! Nice illustration of wearing Christ's righteousness for kids!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Danette

    I love this so much.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    One of Sproul's better children's books. One of Sproul's better children's books.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    My review here: http://lunchboxsw.wordpress.com/2011/... My review here: http://lunchboxsw.wordpress.com/2011/...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Great story to teach about God's great love for us, and the imputed righteousness of Christ. The children loved the story too! Great story to teach about God's great love for us, and the imputed righteousness of Christ. The children loved the story too!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Becky Pliego

    Love it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jiju Mathew

    Great children’s book from one of fav teachers. Biblical. Solid. Imaginative. Captivating for the mind and the heart. Each pages are ratcheted up to captivate our own place, where we are and what this “Prince” can do for us all. The author allows the kids and the adults alike to help us not only give meaning and worth to our lives but to love it. I think if you ever want someone to love the Truth, tell them a Story and RC did just that!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shaina Herrmann

    Read once with the kids during morning time. Listened again this week to a free dramatic audio recording by R.C. Sproul. I don't usually review children's books on here, but I felt it was worth saying that this is now one of my favorite children's books. Very well written and I'm sure we'll be repeating it again and again over the years! Read once with the kids during morning time. Listened again this week to a free dramatic audio recording by R.C. Sproul. I don't usually review children's books on here, but I felt it was worth saying that this is now one of my favorite children's books. Very well written and I'm sure we'll be repeating it again and again over the years!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Richard Minor

    I am going to advertise this book rather than review it by telling a story. I read this with my daughter who is 5. I said, “Why can we stand before God?” Her answer was, “Because Jesus gave us His clothes.” The doctrine of imputation taught in this wonderful story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paige McClure

    Love this book. Great read aloud.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mason McCray

    A wonderful story about the gift of grace and Christ righteousness. Can’t wait until my child is born to read this to him or her

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    My first time going through a childrens book by R.C Sproul. I must say i am not disappointed. the story had so much biblical truth. This would make a good play for kids.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hope Lebedev

    Good story, but I think I went on a little too long for a childrens book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This was a great book as we are beginning to have deeper conversations with our child about the Gospel. It gave great bridges to the Gospel with a story and illustrations that were captivating for a child.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I read this to three boys ages 9-13, probably a little older than the target age. They followed it and enacted with it well, though I don't think they were crazy about it. What I most appreciated was that it got them thinking. I told them up front that it was an allegory so they would stop me and tell the meaning behind the story. They seemed pleased that they had figured it out and I was pleased that they were thinking and that they could catch the parallels. However, I was puzzled by a couple I read this to three boys ages 9-13, probably a little older than the target age. They followed it and enacted with it well, though I don't think they were crazy about it. What I most appreciated was that it got them thinking. I told them up front that it was an allegory so they would stop me and tell the meaning behind the story. They seemed pleased that they had figured it out and I was pleased that they were thinking and that they could catch the parallels. However, I was puzzled by a couple of things. I'm not sure why the main character was a priest before he received his new robe. I was also troubled that he is portrayed as getting dirty accidentally and is immediately saddened by his dirtiness. You are made to sympathize with him and to feel like he deserves to have clean clothes because after all it wasn't his fault that he got dirty. I know that no allegory can be perfect in every detail, but this seems like a crucial part of the gospel story that cannot afford to be misrepresented. I still think it is a good book, but I would consider explaining the parts that aren't true to life.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Hartley

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leanna

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Glowacz

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.