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A LONG-OUT-OF-PRINT CLASIC BY A MASTER OF UNDERGROUND COMICS In the late 1980s, the idiosyncratic Chester Brown (author of the muchlauded Paying for It and Louis Riel) began writing the cult classic comic book series Yummy Fur. Within its pages, he serialized the groundbreaking Ed the Happy Clown, revealing a macabre universe of parallel dimensions. Thanks to i A LONG-OUT-OF-PRINT CLASIC BY A MASTER OF UNDERGROUND COMICS In the late 1980s, the idiosyncratic Chester Brown (author of the muchlauded Paying for It and Louis Riel) began writing the cult classic comic book series Yummy Fur. Within its pages, he serialized the groundbreaking Ed the Happy Clown, revealing a macabre universe of parallel dimensions. Thanks to its wholly original yet disturbing story lines, Ed set the stage for Brown to become a world-renowned cartoonist. Ed the Happy Clown is a hallucinatory tale that functions simultaneously as a dark roller-coaster ride of criminal activity and a scathing condemnation of religious and political charlatanism. As the world around him devolves into madness, the eponymous Ed escapes variously from a jealous boyfriend, sewer monsters, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and a janitor with a Jesus complex. Brown leaves us wondering, with every twist of the plot, just how Ed will get out of this scrape. The intimate, tangled world of Ed the Happy Clown is definitively presented here, repackaged with a new foreword by the author and an extensive notes section, and is, like every Brown book, astonishingly perceptive about the zeitgeist of its time.


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A LONG-OUT-OF-PRINT CLASIC BY A MASTER OF UNDERGROUND COMICS In the late 1980s, the idiosyncratic Chester Brown (author of the muchlauded Paying for It and Louis Riel) began writing the cult classic comic book series Yummy Fur. Within its pages, he serialized the groundbreaking Ed the Happy Clown, revealing a macabre universe of parallel dimensions. Thanks to i A LONG-OUT-OF-PRINT CLASIC BY A MASTER OF UNDERGROUND COMICS In the late 1980s, the idiosyncratic Chester Brown (author of the muchlauded Paying for It and Louis Riel) began writing the cult classic comic book series Yummy Fur. Within its pages, he serialized the groundbreaking Ed the Happy Clown, revealing a macabre universe of parallel dimensions. Thanks to its wholly original yet disturbing story lines, Ed set the stage for Brown to become a world-renowned cartoonist. Ed the Happy Clown is a hallucinatory tale that functions simultaneously as a dark roller-coaster ride of criminal activity and a scathing condemnation of religious and political charlatanism. As the world around him devolves into madness, the eponymous Ed escapes variously from a jealous boyfriend, sewer monsters, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and a janitor with a Jesus complex. Brown leaves us wondering, with every twist of the plot, just how Ed will get out of this scrape. The intimate, tangled world of Ed the Happy Clown is definitively presented here, repackaged with a new foreword by the author and an extensive notes section, and is, like every Brown book, astonishingly perceptive about the zeitgeist of its time.

30 review for Ed the Happy Clown - A Serialized Reprinting of Chester Brown's First Graphic Novel (Issue 1 of 9)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Ed is a happy clown because he’s heading to the hospital to entertain sick kids... That’s how one of the zaniest comic books you’ll ever read begins. From there, Ed the unfortunate clown gets beaten up by anarchists, sent to prison where a man who can’t stop pooping might drown Ed in poop, and pursued by pygmies. Oh and his penis becomes Ronald Reagan. If you’ve read Chester Brown before you’ll know he’s best known for memoir type comic books like “I’ve Never Liked You”, “The Playboy” and last y Ed is a happy clown because he’s heading to the hospital to entertain sick kids... That’s how one of the zaniest comic books you’ll ever read begins. From there, Ed the unfortunate clown gets beaten up by anarchists, sent to prison where a man who can’t stop pooping might drown Ed in poop, and pursued by pygmies. Oh and his penis becomes Ronald Reagan. If you’ve read Chester Brown before you’ll know he’s best known for memoir type comic books like “I’ve Never Liked You”, “The Playboy” and last year’s excellent “Paying For It”, or the award-winning biography “Louis Riel”. “Ed the Happy Clown” is Brown’s first book and a long out-of-print masterpiece of bizarre and improvised plotting. Brown includes an extensive notes section at the back which is almost as good as reading the book itself. It provides background details to how the book was conceived and written/drawn along with biographical details of the author and the reaction to his work as it was released in his bi-monthly comic “Yummy Fur”. Brown admits that because he didn’t have anything to say in his early twenties he just threw together random storylines, whatever was on his mind, straight onto the page. It definitely reads that way but after a certain point the various story threads begin intersecting and make a strange kind of sense. The murderous religious janitor connects to the vampire Josie who leads to the pygmies who leads to Ronald Reagan penis who leads to the man who can’t stop pooping who leads to Dimension X. This book is a must-read just for that summary - you’ll never read a book like this. And it’s really funny too. Granted, you need a dark sense of humour to find this stuff hilarious but if insane doctors beating patients with bats, homophobic TV scientists shooting midgets and housewife bounty hunters shooting pygmies is your bag, you’ll get a lot out of this. There’s also Dimension X and where it is... I can’t give it away, it’s too funny. I’ve waited a long time to see this book back in print and reading it now, it still holds up 25+ years down the line. This may be Brown’s first attempt at comics but it shows a young talent - immature yes, but the talent is undeniable. And it’s a fantastic read. Funny, clever, hugely imaginative and creative, “Ed the Happy Clown” is a must-read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Vacca

    Sure, the drawing is crude, the plotting nonsensical, the humor juvenile and the characters have as many dimensions as the page they're printed on, but this shit's just too punk rock not to be fun! Ed the Happy Clown (which has very little clowning at all - poor woe-besotted Ed loses his make-up and orange hair only a few page in) is Brown's graphic debut, and is packed with sex, vampires, penises with Ronald Reagan's head, homophobic scientists, portals to other dimensions located in some unluc Sure, the drawing is crude, the plotting nonsensical, the humor juvenile and the characters have as many dimensions as the page they're printed on, but this shit's just too punk rock not to be fun! Ed the Happy Clown (which has very little clowning at all - poor woe-besotted Ed loses his make-up and orange hair only a few page in) is Brown's graphic debut, and is packed with sex, vampires, penises with Ronald Reagan's head, homophobic scientists, portals to other dimensions located in some unlucky son of a bitch's asshole, violent cops, pygmies, divine miracles, demons, ghosts, unethical surgeons and more penises. This comic is comparable to Alex Cox's Repo Man, in that, like that particular movie, this comic bounds with youthfulness, attitude and bad taste. Brown's expansive notes at book's back make for an interesting issue-by-issue commentary, as the author riffs on subjects like how he got into the comic-making biz, and how unhappy he was with most of this comic, and also about his post-break-up suicidal thoughts. This was my first lick of Chester Brown and I'll be sure to have another taste soon.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    One of my favorite comics. It starts as a series of short improvisational stories, but Chester Brown eventually brings all of these elements together and creates a fascinating narrative. The extensive notes that Brown makes on the text give a lot of interesting context to the stories. I especially like his criticism of certain parts that he now finds immature or offensive. I had forgotten just how well the story is developed. He does a great job of tying all the silly beginnings together in a way One of my favorite comics. It starts as a series of short improvisational stories, but Chester Brown eventually brings all of these elements together and creates a fascinating narrative. The extensive notes that Brown makes on the text give a lot of interesting context to the stories. I especially like his criticism of certain parts that he now finds immature or offensive. I had forgotten just how well the story is developed. He does a great job of tying all the silly beginnings together in a way that (almost) seems like it was all planned from the very start.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Ed the Happy Clown reaches into the depths of depravity like no other comic I can really think of...and this is in a world where Prison Pit and The Squirrel Machine both comfortably exist. There were many times during the book when I looked up from what I was reading to talk to my girlfriend and then turned back to the page I was on, only to realize that I was, for example, in the middle of a scene where Ronald Reagan had become the vomiting head of someone else's penis, or a dead man's asshole Ed the Happy Clown reaches into the depths of depravity like no other comic I can really think of...and this is in a world where Prison Pit and The Squirrel Machine both comfortably exist. There were many times during the book when I looked up from what I was reading to talk to my girlfriend and then turned back to the page I was on, only to realize that I was, for example, in the middle of a scene where Ronald Reagan had become the vomiting head of someone else's penis, or a dead man's asshole was the shit-filled entrance to another dimension. And like, it took breaking my concentration to realize this was even happening, that this wasn't totally normal. Ed the Happy Clown is the reason that the phrase "what the actual fuck" was invented. It couldn't be described without these words. What makes Ed stand out from a lot of other exploitation/horror comics is that on top of being insane, it is also very very sad. Painfully, tragically so. It starts bad and gets worse so quickly, so completely, that the despair of it is almost numbing. On the one hand, it's yet another comic that makes me wish I could reincarnate backward so that I could have been a burgeoning comic book artist myself in the early 1980's. On the other hand, Chester Brown is apparently a libertarian, so at the end of the day it's just another weird comic drawn by a dumbass white guy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    Ed the Happy Clown is a satire of contemporary western culture that encapsulates far more than just the Regan era in in which it was written. Like a true piece of cultural satire, it uses absurdity to its full extent by reflecting back our collectively irrational thoughts and actions—our insanity. From vampires to alternate universes to talking penises, Brown blends literary genres with guttural imagery to create a tale that is as soulful and entertaining as it is nauseating. The reader, with ea Ed the Happy Clown is a satire of contemporary western culture that encapsulates far more than just the Regan era in in which it was written. Like a true piece of cultural satire, it uses absurdity to its full extent by reflecting back our collectively irrational thoughts and actions—our insanity. From vampires to alternate universes to talking penises, Brown blends literary genres with guttural imagery to create a tale that is as soulful and entertaining as it is nauseating. The reader, with each twist and turn and absurdist leap, gradually finds a haunting criteque of human nature, focusing in large part on males' obsessive fear of their own penises. If I could recommend just one graphic/comic piece of fiction to anyone, it would be this one. Unfortunately, the collection of all the issues is currently out-of-print. Though you can buy each individual issue at Drawn and Quarterly, which is worth any additional cost. As would buying a out-of-print copy of the 1989 Yummy Fur collection with a foreword by Harvey Pekar. I should put the usual disclaimer that I have seen other reviewers add: Ed the Happy Clown is not for everyone. It’s disturbing at times (unless you’ve already honed your macabre sense of humor). But so what? It will disturb you. Because oddly enough, it all makes sense. Dude, I say go for it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shazia

    Despite my feelings on Chester Brown after reading Paying for It, I can't deny the fact that I really do like his artwork and his comics. Ed the Happy Clown was kind of all over the place but oddly enough it worked. The bits with the Ronald Reagan character was kind of boring/not my favorite part of the story but I still enjoyed the graphic novel as a whole. Again, I really enjoy the notes that Brown includes after his comics, which explain certain panels/pages and helps me understand not only h Despite my feelings on Chester Brown after reading Paying for It, I can't deny the fact that I really do like his artwork and his comics. Ed the Happy Clown was kind of all over the place but oddly enough it worked. The bits with the Ronald Reagan character was kind of boring/not my favorite part of the story but I still enjoyed the graphic novel as a whole. Again, I really enjoy the notes that Brown includes after his comics, which explain certain panels/pages and helps me understand not only his artwork, but him as an individual and a creator. I'm still looking forward to reading more of his work, and I think Mary Wept Over the Feet of Jesus is my next read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mikayla

    I don't know what to say about this book other than it's weird, slightly disturbing (in a good interesting way and doesn't take long to read. It's better than other graphic novels I've tried to pick up as I actually managed to stay interested and only took and hour to read. I don't know what to say about this book other than it's weird, slightly disturbing (in a good interesting way and doesn't take long to read. It's better than other graphic novels I've tried to pick up as I actually managed to stay interested and only took and hour to read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Raisu

    Well. That was weird.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joey Shapiro

    I read this years ago and it is truly one of my faves!!! Dark and surreal and very very very incredibly funny.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Along with Alan Moore's 80's work (Swamp Thing, Miracle Man and Watchmen) Brown's "ED The Happy Clown" in its collected form is/was and probably always be a great source of creative energy for me. The best way I can sum Ed up is that a book that may very well have been and still is ahead of its time. Pure creative genius. Along with Alan Moore's 80's work (Swamp Thing, Miracle Man and Watchmen) Brown's "ED The Happy Clown" in its collected form is/was and probably always be a great source of creative energy for me. The best way I can sum Ed up is that a book that may very well have been and still is ahead of its time. Pure creative genius.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jonnie

    I'd like to describe this book like a person who goes to a cafe and orders a cappuccino with three sugars, and instead they get a long black without cream. Different tastes for different people, I suppose. Because it's not horrible, it's incredibly well written and illustrated, it's just too weird for my tastes. Guess I missed the Yummy Fur cult classic train. I'd like to describe this book like a person who goes to a cafe and orders a cappuccino with three sugars, and instead they get a long black without cream. Different tastes for different people, I suppose. Because it's not horrible, it's incredibly well written and illustrated, it's just too weird for my tastes. Guess I missed the Yummy Fur cult classic train.

  12. 4 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    What a mess in a cesspool of fools- this is a FILTHY book that shines in its squalor and loses no translation to the American dollar! It's rife with an unctuous splattering of topics that offend "the masses" which ooze with quality in the tragedy and/or comedy that he imparts with such incendiary artillery. I've previously found Chess Moreno over-zealous AND tiresome- the type who is frustrating in his compulsion to "stir the pot" of society's rot and silly whatnot but it seems that he fresher fla What a mess in a cesspool of fools- this is a FILTHY book that shines in its squalor and loses no translation to the American dollar! It's rife with an unctuous splattering of topics that offend "the masses" which ooze with quality in the tragedy and/or comedy that he imparts with such incendiary artillery. I've previously found Chess Moreno over-zealous AND tiresome- the type who is frustrating in his compulsion to "stir the pot" of society's rot and silly whatnot but it seems that he fresher flair when he wore Michael Bolton hair. This is the kind of collection that NEEDS a good introduction* to give readers faith in the risk-taking and provocative writer who -as the best are wont to do- had faith to present it in the manner they chose despite fears of misinterpretation. -_I NEED TO SAVE THIS AND COME BACK LATER - THIS DESERVES THE TIME IT TAKES FOR A COMPLETE REVIEW_- *In two short pages Steve Solomos gives NOTHING away and stands firmly as the best introduction that I can recall without doing some clicking in my lists but is probably the BEST example of the angle he took for his intended purpose. He delves into the various classifications attributed by others to the material within then deftly expounds upon them in contrast to widely known works to arrive at his own summation which firmly accomplishes what the best achieve- it makes you excited about the book and stimulates an interest to read it in a profound "scholarly" manner due to the artistic/literary ethos he successfully injects! On the inside cover of my copy: "Hola Morwenacita! Here's a little Psychotic Canadianism to remind you of the little people. Yours Truly, Chiquita Bonita Juanita Bonita Mama Guava

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jesús

    An unfortunate clown finds himself the victim of a number of unlikely events. Chester Brown has disowned much of his later run on the character, so this volume is the result of Brown’s strong editorial hand. Not having read Yummy Fur when it was serialized in zine form, I can’t say if that’s for the better. But what’s here is disappointingly cut short, leaving only to our imaginations what might be next for this odd cast. The real selling point are the notes that Chester Brown added for this edit An unfortunate clown finds himself the victim of a number of unlikely events. Chester Brown has disowned much of his later run on the character, so this volume is the result of Brown’s strong editorial hand. Not having read Yummy Fur when it was serialized in zine form, I can’t say if that’s for the better. But what’s here is disappointingly cut short, leaving only to our imaginations what might be next for this odd cast. The real selling point are the notes that Chester Brown added for this edition. In his lengthy notes that follow each of the nine issues/chapters, he’s honest and candid about his process, techniques, and even his politics.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sooraya Evans

    This is weird for the sake of just being weird. Lets see. A guy who can’t stop pooping. Another guy whose hand just randomly fall off. A talking penis. Eww! A bunch of alien pygmies worshiping said penis. In the midst of it all, some vampires are hunting these pygmies. Nothing makes sense.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pierke

    What an acid trip. Totally blown away! Liked it a lot.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    It's been awhile since I last read Ed the Happy Clown, and the main reason I picked this one up again was because I was also reading Brian Evenson's new book, Ed Vs. Yummy Fur: Or, What Happens When a Serial Comic Becomes a Graphic Novel. So I re-read Ed while going through Evenson's analysis -- very good, by the way -- and I'm glad I did. Not only was it useful to re-familiarize myself with the narrative, but this is just a damn fun (and surreal and wacky) story. I love Chester Brown's work, an It's been awhile since I last read Ed the Happy Clown, and the main reason I picked this one up again was because I was also reading Brian Evenson's new book, Ed Vs. Yummy Fur: Or, What Happens When a Serial Comic Becomes a Graphic Novel. So I re-read Ed while going through Evenson's analysis -- very good, by the way -- and I'm glad I did. Not only was it useful to re-familiarize myself with the narrative, but this is just a damn fun (and surreal and wacky) story. I love Chester Brown's work, and reading this again has got me wanting to re-read his other works...perhaps go on a Chester Brown binge. I also want to go through all of the issues of Yummy Fur and Underwater, as well...especially the former, where I can see the Ed comics that were never collected in any "definitive" edition. Plus, you can never have too many pairings of Ronald Reagan with penises. Update 4/29/16- rereading, yet again, and this time for our interview with Chester Brown on The Comics Alternative: http://comicsalternative.com/comics-a....

  17. 4 out of 5

    MariNaomi

    This went against a lot of my rules for liking a graphic novel--the storyline was developed on the fly, the art is inconsistent, and the writing was self-conscious. Basically, he was learning how to be a cartoonist as he did these, and it seems like his editor was very hands-off. Yet once I got into it, I was mesmerized by his dark humor and the surreal world he created. The cartoonist in me really appreciated the notes at the end, which was pretty much a memoir about his process and all that wa This went against a lot of my rules for liking a graphic novel--the storyline was developed on the fly, the art is inconsistent, and the writing was self-conscious. Basically, he was learning how to be a cartoonist as he did these, and it seems like his editor was very hands-off. Yet once I got into it, I was mesmerized by his dark humor and the surreal world he created. The cartoonist in me really appreciated the notes at the end, which was pretty much a memoir about his process and all that was going on in his life while he was writing this book. As a standalone book, it's got a lot of flaws but was a decent read. However, as a study on how a young man became a master at comics, this book was fantastic.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nickolas

    A guy at work lent this book to me and “wow” was the text message I sent him later that night. I had been reading some pretty heavy stuff lately and this was such a needed relief. It’s best not to know anything about this going into it but it is a delightfully easy read that progresses and then progresses some more from silly, to horrible, to really horrible to uncontrolled laughter. It’s a book by a Canadian in the 1980’s who’s taking such a brilliantly immature and ridiculously ‘out there’ dum A guy at work lent this book to me and “wow” was the text message I sent him later that night. I had been reading some pretty heavy stuff lately and this was such a needed relief. It’s best not to know anything about this going into it but it is a delightfully easy read that progresses and then progresses some more from silly, to horrible, to really horrible to uncontrolled laughter. It’s a book by a Canadian in the 1980’s who’s taking such a brilliantly immature and ridiculously ‘out there’ dump on America that you have to step back and give him a round of applause for imagination. I thoroughly enjoyed this trash.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Finally got around to reading ED a full two decades after my first encounter with the work of Chester Brown. The early publication date and cute title led me to believe that this collection would be rather innocuous, but it turns out that ED is in fact a revolting surrealistic land mine. Brown's ability to shock and repulse with his careful images turns out to be his greatest strength in this book, to my further surprise. His ability to navigate surrealism, on the other hand, is a bit clunky, an Finally got around to reading ED a full two decades after my first encounter with the work of Chester Brown. The early publication date and cute title led me to believe that this collection would be rather innocuous, but it turns out that ED is in fact a revolting surrealistic land mine. Brown's ability to shock and repulse with his careful images turns out to be his greatest strength in this book, to my further surprise. His ability to navigate surrealism, on the other hand, is a bit clunky, and Brown seems much more at home with the traditional structure found in his subsequent books. Grateful to the author for the experiment, but happy that it was only one stage in his development.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    I'm realizing that, for the most part, I need to ignore positive reviews of indie comics - I almost consistently find them uninspired. I find more to praise in the well received mainstream ... somewhat similar to my feeling that "video art" is almost invariably more pretentious and hollow than great cinema. In many ways, there's nothing really independent about it (or video art); they hew to a very narrow set of themes and stylistic markers. I give this 2 stars instead of 1 because I'm an easy t I'm realizing that, for the most part, I need to ignore positive reviews of indie comics - I almost consistently find them uninspired. I find more to praise in the well received mainstream ... somewhat similar to my feeling that "video art" is almost invariably more pretentious and hollow than great cinema. In many ways, there's nothing really independent about it (or video art); they hew to a very narrow set of themes and stylistic markers. I give this 2 stars instead of 1 because I'm an easy target for lowbrow humor and it did make me laugh a few times ... though far too few.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Xandra

    Not a complete disaster, but still crap. Amusingly, it does a good job at summarizing itself. I enjoyed some of its absurdity - never going as far as deeming it smart - and I have to appreciate this guy's imagination. However, given my ability to stupidly laugh at basically anything even remotely resembling a joke, the fact that I reluctantly smiled a few times while reading this isn't exactly complimentary. Or maybe, distinct possibility, I'm just too stupid to "get it". Not a complete disaster, but still crap. Amusingly, it does a good job at summarizing itself. I enjoyed some of its absurdity - never going as far as deeming it smart - and I have to appreciate this guy's imagination. However, given my ability to stupidly laugh at basically anything even remotely resembling a joke, the fact that I reluctantly smiled a few times while reading this isn't exactly complimentary. Or maybe, distinct possibility, I'm just too stupid to "get it".

  22. 5 out of 5

    mwpm mwpm

    I liked aspects of the book immensely, but other aspects I had no interest in whatsoever... which made for an imbalanced read. The author admits that he drew from the Surrealists method of spontaneous (or automatic) writing, a method intended to draw from the unconscious mind; he also admits to the varied, often meandering, results of such a method. But if you're interested in reading a graphic novel in which Ronald Reagan's head is mysteriously grafted onto the end of a penis, this is the graph I liked aspects of the book immensely, but other aspects I had no interest in whatsoever... which made for an imbalanced read. The author admits that he drew from the Surrealists method of spontaneous (or automatic) writing, a method intended to draw from the unconscious mind; he also admits to the varied, often meandering, results of such a method. But if you're interested in reading a graphic novel in which Ronald Reagan's head is mysteriously grafted onto the end of a penis, this is the graphic novel for you!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Holly Lindquist

    Disturbing, unique, and hilarious comic. Only book I know that asks: What if your bum was a doorway to an alternate dimension? This is an important question, and kudos to Mr. Brown for tackling it. The story also contains a vampire, a fellow who is not a werewolf, religious wackery, roving tribes of cannibalistic sewer pygmies, and a very presidential talking phallus. Oh, by the way, about Ed.. he ain't too happy. Poor little clown.. Disturbing, unique, and hilarious comic. Only book I know that asks: What if your bum was a doorway to an alternate dimension? This is an important question, and kudos to Mr. Brown for tackling it. The story also contains a vampire, a fellow who is not a werewolf, religious wackery, roving tribes of cannibalistic sewer pygmies, and a very presidential talking phallus. Oh, by the way, about Ed.. he ain't too happy. Poor little clown..

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adan

    I'm a pretty big fan of Chester Brown's autobiographical stuff (especially Paying For It), but this was a totally different thing. At first it felt like a bunch of disjointed and unconnected strips, but then it became apparent that everything was in fact connected, and everything was in fact totally fucking weird. And I totally feel for the Man Who Couldn't Stop. I'm a pretty big fan of Chester Brown's autobiographical stuff (especially Paying For It), but this was a totally different thing. At first it felt like a bunch of disjointed and unconnected strips, but then it became apparent that everything was in fact connected, and everything was in fact totally fucking weird. And I totally feel for the Man Who Couldn't Stop.

  25. 5 out of 5

    A.

    DRAWN AND QUARTERLY WHEN ARE YOU PUTTING THIS BACK IN PRINT???? LOOK AT ME YR MAKING ME YELL ON THE ONLINE.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I learned that you shouldn't stick your head into a black hole. I learned that you shouldn't stick your head into a black hole.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael Seidlinger

    There's a lot of sick and fun humor here. It works better as little comic strips than as a whole story, especially with the extremely abrupt and anticlimactic ending. There's a lot of sick and fun humor here. It works better as little comic strips than as a whole story, especially with the extremely abrupt and anticlimactic ending.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Surrealistic craziness. I was obsessed with this story as it came out in comic book form. With each panel you continue to wonder where in the wild hell the story might go next.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sean Manzano

    Finally...... I first heard of Ed the Happy Clown and Yummy Fur years ago in a magazine that covered different comics/comic imprints (after a quick Google search I think it was Hero Illustrated). From the brief and surreal description of Ed I knew I had to read it. However, as I was quite young getting my hands on a copy of Yummy Fur was nigh impossible. Years later I stopped by a local comic book store and while browsing I saw the name Chester Brown. I remember thinking "Woah, this is the Yummy Finally...... I first heard of Ed the Happy Clown and Yummy Fur years ago in a magazine that covered different comics/comic imprints (after a quick Google search I think it was Hero Illustrated). From the brief and surreal description of Ed I knew I had to read it. However, as I was quite young getting my hands on a copy of Yummy Fur was nigh impossible. Years later I stopped by a local comic book store and while browsing I saw the name Chester Brown. I remember thinking "Woah, this is the Yummy Fur guy!" I picked up I Never Liked You and Paying For It and thought they were great. Despite finally getting my hands on some Chester Brown stuff it would still be a few years until I read Ed. That all changed a few days ago. While doing some cleaning and reorganizing came across my copy of I Never Liked You. The proverbial light bulb went off and I checked to see if Ed was available digitally....and...well here we are. After almost 26 years I've finally managed to read Ed the Happy Clown and I have to say it is one of the most wonderfully surreal and totally over the top comics I've ever read. Gonna have to pick up a physical copy as this definitely deserves a spot on my bookshelf. 5 stars, 10/10.....perfect.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Inspired, creepy, inscrutable and ultimately fascinating in it's feverish stream of consciousness way. This book/graphic novel is a joy-ride into the mind and process of a gifted writer and graphic artist. I've arrived late to the graphic novel genre, and I appreciate that this was written 15 years ago, but Brown's commentary/end notes help give clarity to what the book might have meant to him when he wrote it and what it might mean to someone reading it so many years later. This early work by Br Inspired, creepy, inscrutable and ultimately fascinating in it's feverish stream of consciousness way. This book/graphic novel is a joy-ride into the mind and process of a gifted writer and graphic artist. I've arrived late to the graphic novel genre, and I appreciate that this was written 15 years ago, but Brown's commentary/end notes help give clarity to what the book might have meant to him when he wrote it and what it might mean to someone reading it so many years later. This early work by Brown makes many critics' top 10 and I can see why. The work is part confessional biography and part artistic experiment of the form and when the narrative stumbles in story progression it catches its step with sheer momentum and determination. The story is much like a get-away car, with the reader as hostage, which doesn't so much stop at the end of the ride, as much as it slows just long enough at an unexpected intersection that the captive is able to stumble hazily out the rear door and roll to safety.

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