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The new novel from the international bestselling author of the Wool trilogy. The old world is buried. A new one has been forged atop the shifting dunes. Here in this land of howling wind and infernal sand, four siblings find themselves scattered and lost. Palmer has never been the same since his father walked out twelve years ago. His elder sister, Vic, is trying to run away The new novel from the international bestselling author of the Wool trilogy. The old world is buried. A new one has been forged atop the shifting dunes. Here in this land of howling wind and infernal sand, four siblings find themselves scattered and lost. Palmer has never been the same since his father walked out twelve years ago. His elder sister, Vic, is trying to run away from the past; his younger brothers, Connor and Rob, are risking their lives to embrace it. His mother, left with nothing but anger, is just trying to forget. Palmer wants to prove his worth, not only to his family, but to himself. And in the barren, dune-covered landscape of his home, there is only one way to earn respect: sand-diving. Plunging deep below the desert floor in search of relics and scraps of the old world. He is about to embark on the most dangerous dive of his young life, aiming to become the first to discover the rumoured city below. Deep within the sand lies the key to bringing his family together – and tearing their world apart.


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The new novel from the international bestselling author of the Wool trilogy. The old world is buried. A new one has been forged atop the shifting dunes. Here in this land of howling wind and infernal sand, four siblings find themselves scattered and lost. Palmer has never been the same since his father walked out twelve years ago. His elder sister, Vic, is trying to run away The new novel from the international bestselling author of the Wool trilogy. The old world is buried. A new one has been forged atop the shifting dunes. Here in this land of howling wind and infernal sand, four siblings find themselves scattered and lost. Palmer has never been the same since his father walked out twelve years ago. His elder sister, Vic, is trying to run away from the past; his younger brothers, Connor and Rob, are risking their lives to embrace it. His mother, left with nothing but anger, is just trying to forget. Palmer wants to prove his worth, not only to his family, but to himself. And in the barren, dune-covered landscape of his home, there is only one way to earn respect: sand-diving. Plunging deep below the desert floor in search of relics and scraps of the old world. He is about to embark on the most dangerous dive of his young life, aiming to become the first to discover the rumoured city below. Deep within the sand lies the key to bringing his family together – and tearing their world apart.

30 review for Sand

  1. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    in this post-apocalyptic tale, sand is like water; maverick sand divers use their amazing sand suits to uncover buried pre-apocalypse tools and materials. otherwise life is pretty miserable, and sandy. there's an actual glossary of sand terms! happily the book is so much more than that admittedly original concept. all the different voices of a disparate family give this future society flavor and nuance. the characters themselves are warmly developed. the depressing atmosphere was nicely alleviate in this post-apocalyptic tale, sand is like water; maverick sand divers use their amazing sand suits to uncover buried pre-apocalypse tools and materials. otherwise life is pretty miserable, and sandy. there's an actual glossary of sand terms! happily the book is so much more than that admittedly original concept. all the different voices of a disparate family give this future society flavor and nuance. the characters themselves are warmly developed. the depressing atmosphere was nicely alleviated by characters who are always striving, always trying to move forward. there was one particularly impressive scene where a young woman channels all the pain and trauma and sadness and anger she's experienced in her life to give herself the strength needed to perform an impossible feat. that was an astonishing bit of writing, poetic and visceral and intense. moving. overall Sand is a well-written novel. no clichés in sight and many surprises throughout the narrative. perhaps the biggest surprise for me was how I was so successfully manipulated into supporting something I'm morally against. now I'm a dyed-in-the-wool progressive, against war and state-sponsored violence et cetera. so I did not expect to eventually come to a place where I was cheering on the wholesale slaughter of thousands of people and the destruction of a city. when I realized I was feeling such things, the bottom sorta dropped out from under me. but sometimes people are so crushed under the foot of their oppressors that they are driven to do things, and sometimes those things are savagely violent and vindictive. I wonder: did Howey realize that his novel functions as an argument in favor of terrorism and the utter annihilation of one's enemies? well, he certainly constructed a convincing argument. one thing truly aggravated me: the unnecessary identification of a minor character as black. even a description of him as being black as charcoal. now this would not bother me in the least if other characters were racially identified. but that was not the case. essentially, Howey's decision to identify only this character's race implies that the default is white. what the fuck. I AM SO FUCKING TIRED OF GENRE AUTHORS ASSUMING THAT THEIR POST-APOCALYPTIC WASTELANDS OR THEIR ZOMBIE-RIDDEN SUBURBIAS OR THEIR FOOFY LITTLE FAIRYLANDS ARE ALL WHITE, WHITE, WHITE SO ANYONE WHO IS NON-WHITE WILL DEFINITELY GET THEIR SKIN COLOR MENTIONED, BUT EVERYONE ELSE... WELL THE READER SHOULD JUST ASSUME THAT THEY ARE WHITE WHITE WHITE ALL FUCKING WHITE ALL THE FUCKING TIME. JUST FUCK OFF WITH THAT ALREADY AND JOIN THE MODERN WORLD! THIS IS NOT THE FUCKING 1950s! THE DEFAULT IS NOT WHITE, GENIUSES. still, all that said, a good book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    Am I really only the second person to rate this 1 star? Am I the asshole here? So be it. As a huge fan of Wool Omnibus (Silo, #1) and Hugh Howey, I was extremely disappointed with his latest effort. I found myself unable to get into the story, to connect with most of the characters, to visualize this sand-buried world. No matter how hard I tried, I couldn't feel any of it. Howey's writing is good -- as always. He is definitely skilled with the written word. But the plot left me trolling other review Am I really only the second person to rate this 1 star? Am I the asshole here? So be it. As a huge fan of Wool Omnibus (Silo, #1) and Hugh Howey, I was extremely disappointed with his latest effort. I found myself unable to get into the story, to connect with most of the characters, to visualize this sand-buried world. No matter how hard I tried, I couldn't feel any of it. Howey's writing is good -- as always. He is definitely skilled with the written word. But the plot left me trolling other reviews for answers, for some glimmer of hope that I wasn't the only one struggling through this book. I think the biggest reason is the lack of a mythology. In Wool, Howey built an incredibly imaginative world that was easy to visualize, dropping hints as to the big question of "Why?" throughout the narrative. The world of Sand, however, just was. Maybe he plans to answer some questions -- where did the sand come from? what do the people know about their history? -- in future books. But his inability to create a universe equally as riveting as the one in Wool was disheartening.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Kuhn

    Four and a half rusted and sand-blasted stars. Mr. Howey is a talent, I absolutely loved Wool and part of the challenge is the expectations it created. The setting for Wool and now Sand is brutal and post-apocalyptic. Something happened . . . we don’t know what, nuclear war, extreme climate change . . . something happened. And what’s left is sand, lots of grit, gravel, and sand. So much that there is an entire lexicon around it, which Howey reveals throughout the novel. But, somehow, people are Four and a half rusted and sand-blasted stars. Mr. Howey is a talent, I absolutely loved Wool and part of the challenge is the expectations it created. The setting for Wool and now Sand is brutal and post-apocalyptic. Something happened . . . we don’t know what, nuclear war, extreme climate change . . . something happened. And what’s left is sand, lots of grit, gravel, and sand. So much that there is an entire lexicon around it, which Howey reveals throughout the novel. But, somehow, people are surviving. Sand focuses on a family that persists. They are broken and shattered. They toil all day to keep the wells open. They scavenge the dunes for treasures from the past. And they sand dive . . . I’ll stop there, you’ll have to read the novel if you’re intrigued. Howey’s prose is wonderful. His characters are believable and interesting. He tells a great story, but also skillfully weaves in theme on a regular basis. For instant, “Conner wondered if dredging up the past was even a good idea. It was like being a sand diver in many ways. There were all these rusty hurts buried deep. . . “. I largely enjoyed the story, but it’s so gritty and dark, just like Wool. I would like to see Howey, with all his talents, take on a brighter, more hopeful story. Yes, conflict and struggle make rich literary ground, but so little hope leaves the ground a bit too dry, a bit too grimy in my view. Maybe I need to read Beacon 23, not sure if that explores a bright future or not. In addition, I did think the ending was a bit abrupt. Anyways, still a wonderful book. I could taste the grit in my mouth, feel the matte in my hair, and see the sift in the air. I’m a fan, and will keep picking up Howie’s future works. Strongly recommended, maybe just not if you need some positivity or if you’re the type that’s really annoyed by the beach . . .

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I wanted to like Sand more than I did. I was completely into the story and curious where Howey was taking his characters and readers. I started to wonder about the ending when I realized I was at 95% on my Kindle. To me it feels like he was getting close to his target word count and decided to just tie up the loose ends then and there. Hours after reading the last page, I still feel like there's supposed to be more. I get what he did, but it feels unfinished. I wanted to like Sand more than I did. I was completely into the story and curious where Howey was taking his characters and readers. I started to wonder about the ending when I realized I was at 95% on my Kindle. To me it feels like he was getting close to his target word count and decided to just tie up the loose ends then and there. Hours after reading the last page, I still feel like there's supposed to be more. I get what he did, but it feels unfinished.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eamon Ambrose

    Sand has a very different feel to Wool. It's a much grittier (sorry!) affair in many ways reversing the dynamic. We now have an open environment and a totally disorganised and essentially lawless society where characters fend for themselves, one dusty day at a time. It has a much more adult feel dealing with sexual themes and gory comeuppances and is littered with more swear words than you may be used to from this author but this fits perfectly with the world Howey has once again expertly built Sand has a very different feel to Wool. It's a much grittier (sorry!) affair in many ways reversing the dynamic. We now have an open environment and a totally disorganised and essentially lawless society where characters fend for themselves, one dusty day at a time. It has a much more adult feel dealing with sexual themes and gory comeuppances and is littered with more swear words than you may be used to from this author but this fits perfectly with the world Howey has once again expertly built and while it may not be as intricate and detailed a world as that of the Silos it certainly feels much more grounded in reality for some reason. Not too much is explained about the technology, giving it an almost steampunk feel, we just know it looks cool and it works but we don't really need to know how. The beauty of Sand however is in the writing. There is a true emotion throughout as we see a disengaged family struggle to reunite only to risk being torn apart again by the forces working against them. The characters are subtly introduced and expertly enhanced at key points, not only building on their personalities and history but also keeping the plot flowing steadily. The vivid, contrasting imagery can shift from beauty to ugliness in an instant and back again seamlessly and there are some moments of - and I do not say this lightly- sheer brilliance in Howey's prose and for all it's rough and tumble, Sand has some well-placed and genuinely tender moments which at times can cleverly disarm the reader temporarily, leaving them totally unprepared for the next fiendish plot twist. But fear not, this ain't no sandy Seventh Heaven. Sand is a highly-charged, action-filled, thrill-a-minute, ass-kicking, jawbreaking blockbuster and makes no apologies for it. The panic and claustrophobia of the dives is portrayed perfectly and the tension is retained every single time a character dives into the unforgiving sand even if just for a moment, knowing the slightest error of judgement means instant death. This savage world leaves no prisoners and Danger brashly loiters around every dune and street corner. It's a world where it's much easier to look away than help and sadly this is already starting to mirror today's society, but as our characters prove, the most exceptional of circumstances can yield the most unexpected response from some people. If there was ever any doubt about Hugh Howey's longevity as a writer, Sand is proof that there can be none. Consistency is hard enough for a writer to achieve, constant and sustained improvement is another thing entirely. Now I know it's only January, but I think I've already found my Book of 2014.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    So, this Hugh guy is pretty alright. I've made it no real secret that I adore the Silo Series - I felt it was one of the most creative, haunting and visceral stories I've ever read - a series that stays with you, like, inside you, deep inside. In your feeling (I only have one). With Sand, Howey has created ANOTHER world in the same ilk - haunting, emotional, gloomy. And, like the Silo books, Sand will stick with me for a while. Sand follows a down-on-their-luck family of sand divers in a future C So, this Hugh guy is pretty alright. I've made it no real secret that I adore the Silo Series - I felt it was one of the most creative, haunting and visceral stories I've ever read - a series that stays with you, like, inside you, deep inside. In your feeling (I only have one). With Sand, Howey has created ANOTHER world in the same ilk - haunting, emotional, gloomy. And, like the Silo books, Sand will stick with me for a while. Sand follows a down-on-their-luck family of sand divers in a future Colorado - a Colorado you quickly find is nothing like what you would expect from the state. Everything is covered in hundreds of feet of sand - the book is aptly named, as essentially everything surrounds the stuff. However, there is so much more, beyond even the sand as a metaphor. Palmer, Victoria, Rob and Conner formerly lived what would pass for the high life in this dystopian-esque world, as their father was the leader of a ruling group called The Lords. However, their father ran off, left the children and Rose, their mother, with next to nothing to their name but a whore house. This fractured their family, especially as Rose's debt piled up and she transitioned from running her whore house to working in it as well, which shamed the children. The children are all, or aspire to be, sand divers - people who wear special, electrified suits that allow them to maneuver through deep sand, moving it around their bodies or, if skilled enough, moving large areas of sand to their will. The sand diving and sand suits in themselves are an incredibly creative concept, and Hugh does a masterful job of introducing them slowly, letting you get accustomed to the idea a bit, then gradually introducing more and more these suits can do. Beyond the suits themselves, sand diving is very dependent on the diver themselves - their ability to move sand, to keep their cool while being crushed under mountains of pressure, to risk their lives. The children are all oddly skilled in this art, taking after their father who was known for it. Palmer and his friend Hap are hired by a questionable group of brigands to make a very risky and questionable dive to find the lost city of Danvar, buried under years of sand, hundreds of meters below the surface. Upon finding it, Palmer is betrayed, but gets the better end of the exchange as Hap is murdered by the brigands upon his resurfacing. Palmer, through some luck, is able to resurface a time later. When he wanders into the camp of the brigands, he overhears a sinister plot on their part to kill all of the residents of the sandy slums on the dunes. As the story moves past that, following each of the children in their own thoughts and channels, following their mother Rose for a time, the oppression of the people in the sandy Colorado strip is revealed more and more, and in a very Wool-esque unknowing oppression based manner. Without giving much more of the story away, needless to say they discover that things aren't what they seem. Vague, obviously, but this is a story I think almost anyone should read. On the writing side, I will say this is a more grown up book for Hugh, both in terms of content and prose. The language is much stronger than in the Silo series, and a lot of the subject matter is as well. However, this is all held up by Hugh's growth as a writer - prose was never his weakness, but he's gotten even better. He has a flowing way with words - he's not flowery, he's not overly wordy, he's not a thesaurus referencer; he just writes in a way that sucks you in, keeps the pages turning, gives you a visceral image of what he's talking about, without ever bogging things down with unnecessary items. He's a joy to read. I had high hopes for Sand, but was not sure what to expect. By the end, I was blasting through pages and texting friends how much I loved the novel. It truly is one of my favorites already, and I have very few things to say about it that are not positive.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Neil Hepworth

    About three months ago, my Science Fiction Lit. class and I had the opportunity to interview Hugh Howey. During the interview, naturally, we started talking about his upcoming projects and publications, and he offered some really good advice about his then, as of yet, unpublished novel Sand: don’t read it. It was, according to him, too dark, too vulgar, and too different from Wool Omnibus (Silo, #1). So, don’t waste your time - don't bother, don’t read it.. he said. Naturally, his telling a clas About three months ago, my Science Fiction Lit. class and I had the opportunity to interview Hugh Howey. During the interview, naturally, we started talking about his upcoming projects and publications, and he offered some really good advice about his then, as of yet, unpublished novel Sand: don’t read it. It was, according to him, too dark, too vulgar, and too different from Wool Omnibus (Silo, #1). So, don’t waste your time - don't bother, don’t read it.. he said. Naturally, his telling a class of high schoolers not to read his book made every person in the room move Sand to the top of his or her To Read list. I’m sorry Mr. Howey. You give fantastic advice on your website, and you gave fantastic advice and insight during our interview. But I have failed you. I read Sand. And I loved it. It’s been said before in other reviews, but it bears repeating that this is not Wool. Wool was amazing because it had good characters and an amazing twist-filled mystery plot. Sand is amazing because it has a good plot and amazing downtrodden, sympathetic, gut wrenching characters. Sand is a book filled with hopelessness and a sense of never being able to rise above because life doesn’t actually offer that opportunity. Howey writes several times in his book that the world of Sand is one on which the gods have turned their collective backs. He was right; Sand is that kind of world. Also, not to dump on Wool - it was well written - but Howey's writing in Sand is filled with page after page of beautifully scripted passages. The amount of growth between the writing of Wool and Sand is remarkable. Equally remarkable is the dialogue. For some reason, many authors have a very difficult time writing dialogue that sounds like it’s being spoken by a human being and not a monologuing cartoon character. Even authors who can write otherwise fantastic stories, plots, action scenes and such, trip, stumble and fall either into the pit of "My Character Speaks with an Exposition Stick Up His Ass," or "My Character Speaks Like He’s Fourteen." The characters in Sand, on the the other hand, are all rather quiet, reserved individuals who never let their dialogue get in the way, so when a character does speak, his/her dialogue is filled with weight and value. I loved it. It’s really hard to think of novels similar to Sand. Perhaps The Road for its extraordinarily bleak look at humanity, or perhaps The Running Man for it’s You Cannot Beat the World plot. Actually, a general comparison to Stephen King is rather appropriate: hopeless characters, gritty dialogue, a quiet plot punctuated with severe claustrophobia, moments of grotesque violence, and (my particular favorite) the Life as a Desert metaphor. These elements are all hallmarks that are found in great Stephen King novels. I guess now I’ll have to say they’re hallmarks found in a Hugh Howey novel. I hope every novel he writes in the future is as good as this one. If they are, it will do nothing but continue to cement his place as one of the best science fiction writers we have.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Another excellent book from Hugh Howey who has now joined my list of favourite authors. Like Wool this is a kind of post apocalyptic thriller with some great original ideas. The descriptions of sand diving were brilliant and kept the reader permanently on edge wondering if each individual would survive. The characters were drawn well and as for the ending - loved it! This book could be stand alone or the first of a series. Either way it was exceptionally good.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    A firm 2.5 if I was permitted. The last status update probably says it best. Started out great, finished OK, but staggered around a bit drunkenly in the middle. Also a few awkward, overly graphic scenes that felt out of place. I don't want to say "uncomfortable," since I wasn't offended at all, but they just seemed over-the-top compared to the overall tone of the rest of the book. In particular; the scenes depicting Dystopian Mom-prostitutes's after-sex, rustic contraceptive routines?... just pla A firm 2.5 if I was permitted. The last status update probably says it best. Started out great, finished OK, but staggered around a bit drunkenly in the middle. Also a few awkward, overly graphic scenes that felt out of place. I don't want to say "uncomfortable," since I wasn't offended at all, but they just seemed over-the-top compared to the overall tone of the rest of the book. In particular; the scenes depicting Dystopian Mom-prostitutes's after-sex, rustic contraceptive routines?... just plain awkward. The ending seemed a tad rushed compared to the pace of the earlier parts, too. As always, a very interesting and engaging premise... just not executed nearly as well as Wool, in my opinion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hudson

    **actual rating 3.5** ...... .there wouldn't BE world hunger if you people would live where the FOOD IS! YOU LIVE IN A DESERT!! UNDERSTAND THAT? YOU LIVE IN A FUCKING DESERT!! NOTHING GROWS HERE! NOTHING'S GONNA GROW HERE! Come here, you see this? This is sand. You know what it's gonna be 100 years from now? IT'S GONNA BE SAND!! YOU LIVE IN A FUCKING DESERT! We have deserts in America, we just don't live in them, assholes!" - Sam Kinison Unfortunately moving out of the desert isn't an option for t **actual rating 3.5** ...... .there wouldn't BE world hunger if you people would live where the FOOD IS! YOU LIVE IN A DESERT!! UNDERSTAND THAT? YOU LIVE IN A FUCKING DESERT!! NOTHING GROWS HERE! NOTHING'S GONNA GROW HERE! Come here, you see this? This is sand. You know what it's gonna be 100 years from now? IT'S GONNA BE SAND!! YOU LIVE IN A FUCKING DESERT! We have deserts in America, we just don't live in them, assholes!" - Sam Kinison Unfortunately moving out of the desert isn't an option for the denizens of Low Pub....or is it? Much like Silo, the Sand stories are a bleak, dystopian nightmare set sometime in the future only this time the world is one big desert. There was some really cool ideas in this book such as "sandscrapers" which are tall buildings buried under the sand and the vibrating dive suits that allow the wearer to submerge through the sand much like a scuba diver. Hugh Howey is a really great world-builder. I also liked the way the story was told through the viewpoints of the various members of one family. I was not thrilled with the ending however and that's the reason for the 3.5 rating instead of a 4. I thought the ending was somewhat abrupt and left a lot of questions unanswered. Maybe Howie is leaving room for Sand 2?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cheyenne Blue

    There’s a trend among some Indie authors to take their story and serialize it like a TV show. While I respect their right to do this, personally, I’m not a fan. I see the marketing reasons for this, and as a writer who wants to make money from my writing, it makes a lot of sense. But as a reader, I’m not enthused. Sure, I’ve read some serializations and enjoyed them greatly, but, given the choice, I would rather acquire a book, knowing that “The End” means exactly that. Part of my aversion is I d There’s a trend among some Indie authors to take their story and serialize it like a TV show. While I respect their right to do this, personally, I’m not a fan. I see the marketing reasons for this, and as a writer who wants to make money from my writing, it makes a lot of sense. But as a reader, I’m not enthused. Sure, I’ve read some serializations and enjoyed them greatly, but, given the choice, I would rather acquire a book, knowing that “The End” means exactly that. Part of my aversion is I don’t like having my reading mapped out for me in chunks. I’ve been known to get caught up in a story and read through the night until it’s finished. I want the option of doing that. My reading, my pace. So, when “Sand” Part 1 popped up in front of me, I hesitated. I knew of Howey, of course, from his phenomenal Indie success ,“Wool”. I’d heard it was well plotted, brilliantly executed, superbly written, and absolutely unputdownable. Sounded terrific. But as I didn’t want to read it piecemeal, and the omnibus edition was quite $$$$, I put it on my To Read list and forgot about it. But “Sand” came up on special. It sounded intriguing. And it was a stand-alone novel, available in 5 parts or as an omnibus edition. So, not wanting to read it in serialized parts, I bought the omnibus. And it is brilliant. A highly imaginative plot, set in the near future, in a lawless, dystopian world, where sand dunes cover Colorado and the population lives a perilous existence on the ever-shifting sands. Skilled divers are able to dive the sands, as we dive the Great Barrier Reef, diving for treasure and always searching for the mythical lost city of Danvar. I love everything about it: I love the characters, the story, the threads of the tale, the adventure, the description. I love picking my Colorado out of the mishmash of mangled names. It’s superb. It’s utterly engrossing all the way to the end. But it isn’t the end. Or is it? Sure, it says the end. There’s no TBC. There’s no mention of Sand II anyway. Howey’s website calls it a standalone novel. But it’s not. No thread is tied, not a single one. No character arc is completed, not a single one. It’s like the mid point of a long novel. I swear it IS the mid point of a novel. So, Mr Howey, I feel cheated. If this is the completed, standalone novel your website says it is, then it’s a crock, and I give it 2 stars for the utter lack of any conclusion. If it is in fact, Part 1 of 2 (or heaven help us, of 3), then I give it 5 stars. I’m pretty sure there will eventually be more; I think you’re too good a writer to leave a novel like this. So my problem is that “Sand” is not what it says on the tin. So while I love your Part 1 of 2, Mr Howey, I would not have bought this if I’d known it was unfinished. I’d have waited until there was a real THE END.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Executive Summary: While not as good as Wool I'd put it about on par with Shift and Dust. Audio book: Karen Chilton is a fine but mostly unexceptional reader. However I listened at 1.3x speed, which I don't normally do, so that may played into it slightly. She's clear and easy to understand, but didn't really add or detract from the story itself. Full Review In his first book book since finishing his Silo trilogy, Mr. Howey does a good job creating another interesting post-apocalyptic world. How Executive Summary: While not as good as Wool I'd put it about on par with Shift and Dust. Audio book: Karen Chilton is a fine but mostly unexceptional reader. However I listened at 1.3x speed, which I don't normally do, so that may played into it slightly. She's clear and easy to understand, but didn't really add or detract from the story itself. Full Review In his first book book since finishing his Silo trilogy, Mr. Howey does a good job creating another interesting post-apocalyptic world. However, I'd like to see him write a different type of story next as post-apocalyptic stories really aren't my thing. In this one the world is buried under sand and water is scarce. The daring and (maybe a bit crazy or stupid) use specialized equipment to dive deep under the sand and recover anything deemed valuable to be traded for money and supplies and just to get by. The story is once again split up into multiple parts. The early books seems to each focus on a single POV, while the later ones jump around between them. All of our POV characters are from the same family. The children ranging in age from 10 to late 20's I believe. The oldest, Vic (short for Victoria not Victor) is probably my favorite though all of her younger brothers are interesting in their own right. It's a dangerous world full of thieves, murders and revolutionaries. Like his Silo books, the central story is a bit of a mystery. What happened? Why is the world buried under Sand? And on a smaller scale, what happened to the father of kids who walked off into the desert one night 10 years ago and never returned? This was a short and enjoyable read. As it's post apocalyptic it's more on the dark side so I'm reluctant to call it "light", but it can certainly be called an easy read. There isn't a ton of depth here, but it moves along at a quick pace. I'd say if you enjoyed his previous books you'll likely enjoy this one as well. 3.5 Stars.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Cardin

    I am going to review this hard, because I can feel the sand in my shorts. Four stars because its Hugh and its good, and despite my grit filled thoughts, it was a fine read. First off I am going to stand by what I said at the 50% mark; Sand was written as a vehicle to put the reader into as many scenes of claustrophobic asphyxiation as possible. If you can come up for air long enough to realize you are being played, it's only mildly distracting. I think there were too many characters, too many poin I am going to review this hard, because I can feel the sand in my shorts. Four stars because its Hugh and its good, and despite my grit filled thoughts, it was a fine read. First off I am going to stand by what I said at the 50% mark; Sand was written as a vehicle to put the reader into as many scenes of claustrophobic asphyxiation as possible. If you can come up for air long enough to realize you are being played, it's only mildly distracting. I think there were too many characters, too many points of view that were fairly interchangeable and some of them were surprisingly flat for Hugh who has written zombies with more depth than Rose or Rob. I found myself geographically lost for much of the story. Despite all the location and direction cues given--and there are many--they jumbled up on me and I could not keep straight where the sand was blowing from, where the booms were coming from, or where Shantytown, Low-Pub, Springston, and Danvar where in relation to one another. This just kicked me out of the story almost every time he referenced a location I could not keep straight. It seemed like Conner and Rob had not seen Vic in years, turns out she's only minutes away by sand boat, or so it seemed to me. Where was all the food coming from? If water is such an sought after resource, why are suitcases of dirty undies worth so much money? Seems to me that divers would make a lot more cashola doing what Vic did at one point--diving for water. But really, where is all the food coming from? Not much can live without naturally occurring water sources and soil--I'll give you that deserts are full of life, but it's not much for the dense communities described in Sand to survive on. AND, if there is soil in the mountains, and mountains are AWAY from the booms of bombs, why are people sitting on top of a mile high pile of sand? I know, nag nag nag, Tom, you're being too picky! Hey, I gave it four stars---its a damn good read, but that doesn't mean I can't see where the sand is oozing through the cracks in the scenery. Hugh can deliver more. My suggestion to him is to slow down and take his time fleshing out the details of his next story. He writes very fast, and I feel that this time haste made waste.

  14. 4 out of 5

    D. Robert Pease

    I enjoyed SAND quite a bit, but wasn't quite as blown away as I was with WOOL. I never felt as invested in the characters, partly because Howey jumped around quite a bit. He stayed within the same family, but there never seemed to be enough time spent in one POV. I was also a bit surprised at the direction he took in the later sections. I was really interested in this whole diving for lost treasure thing, and he really built that up, but then kind of threw the concept under the bus later. I won' I enjoyed SAND quite a bit, but wasn't quite as blown away as I was with WOOL. I never felt as invested in the characters, partly because Howey jumped around quite a bit. He stayed within the same family, but there never seemed to be enough time spent in one POV. I was also a bit surprised at the direction he took in the later sections. I was really interested in this whole diving for lost treasure thing, and he really built that up, but then kind of threw the concept under the bus later. I won't go into more detail lest I spoil it for readers. Overall the ending was a bit flat for me as well, being an Omnibus edition, BUT, I realize this is an OMNIBUS of short stories, not novels. I'm excited to see what happens next, because he has built a very interesting world. I suspect that after he writes his next series (or two) and I look at it as a whole, I will be much more excited about it than I am now.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Allen

    Have you ever thought of what will define the world hundreds of years from now? What it might look or sound like? What life would be like? Personally, I have never given it much thought, until I read "Sand". "Sand", written by Hugh Howey, answers all of these questions in his science fiction thriller. Told through the perspective of a family that lives on the dune filled Earth, we are able to experience the daily turmoil that occupies their lives. The world is war torn and crippled. It lacks the Have you ever thought of what will define the world hundreds of years from now? What it might look or sound like? What life would be like? Personally, I have never given it much thought, until I read "Sand". "Sand", written by Hugh Howey, answers all of these questions in his science fiction thriller. Told through the perspective of a family that lives on the dune filled Earth, we are able to experience the daily turmoil that occupies their lives. The world is war torn and crippled. It lacks the efficiency that we have today, even though this book is set in the future. You can either have a job diving under the sand, which takes incredible physical and mental strength, or, you can be a “sissyfoot”, which requires you to fill up sand and dump it over a dune multiple times in order to receive food or water. The people living in this time period are stuck in this routine every day. Bombs and destruction become the norm in their society, and the sound of beating drums across the dunes acts as a constant reminder of another life. The only reason some people don’t leave their towns is because, those who followed the sound of the drums never return. By the end of the book, the theme becomes evident. There is more to our lives than constantly living in fear of the inevitable and, life is easier to bear together than it is alone. One idea that I found extremely intriguing is Hugh Howey’s idea of the future. Normally, when asked about the future, it is easy to picture flying cars and bright neon colors however, Hugh Howey took the future to the next level. His vision of the future in "Sand" is designed to be grotesque and barren. It evokes the essence of loneliness. Having never read one of Hugh Howey’s books before, I wanted to compare the writing from his "Silo" series (Wool, Shift, and Dust) to that of "Sand". I found a quote from the first book in the "Silo" series, "Wool". It reads, “We are born, we are shadows, we cast shadows of own, and then we are gone. All anyone can hope for is to be remembered two shadows deep.” I found a quote from "Sand" that says, “When the desert wraps its great arms around your chest and decides you won’t breathe anymore, that’s when you feel how small you are, just a grain of sand crushed among infinite grains of sand.” By comparing both of these quotes, it is evident that Hugh Howey uses symbols to convey a deeper meaning. This is something that I liked about his book. At times it was very beautifully written, and would make me stop and think about what messages he is trying to communicate to his readers. "Sand", is a creative book in and of itself. I could of never imagined a life such as this if it weren’t for the imaginative writing on the pages of this book. Although sometimes gory and tragic, "Sand" will transport you to another time, somewhere in the future.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Barnett

    Hugh Howey has heart. His talent is a given at this point--not to mention his imagination and work ethic, judging by the rate at which he puts out quality work--but it is his heart that truly elevates his writing and, I think, defines his style. He doesn't simply tell the story. He bleeds it. There are passages in Sand where--pardon the unintentional pun--the sentence structure erodes. Descriptions become fragmented, chaotic. Clipped and fragmented thoughts flow into paragraphs with hardly a peri Hugh Howey has heart. His talent is a given at this point--not to mention his imagination and work ethic, judging by the rate at which he puts out quality work--but it is his heart that truly elevates his writing and, I think, defines his style. He doesn't simply tell the story. He bleeds it. There are passages in Sand where--pardon the unintentional pun--the sentence structure erodes. Descriptions become fragmented, chaotic. Clipped and fragmented thoughts flow into paragraphs with hardly a period in them. The result is something that's messy and beautiful, unpredictable and yet never jarring. Howey handcuffs the reader to each moment. We breathe with the characters. And suffocate with them. But I'm getting ahead of myself. Sand follows an estranged family across--and sometimes, quite literally, deep into--a land that is very much the antithesis of the claustrophobic, totalitarian world of Wool. Pirate-esque figures sail vessels across expansive dunes that hide buried cities. Worn villagers chew on grit and dig endlessly to keep their homes from turning into graves. And divers--well, you'll see. I went into the story knowing next to nothing about it, and that experience is something I wouldn't want to take away from anyone. So, I won't say anything more, except this: Sand is the kind of book that stays with you, the kind of book that leaves you completely satisfied, and yet starving for more. I can't recommend it, or Howey, highly enough.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Colby

    Ok. It's pretty much blasphemy to say this, but I truly felt that Sand was even better than Wool. Every time I think Hugh Howey has hit his stride, he puts something out that elevates his writing even more. His character development is masterful, as always. His world-building is top notch, and he has written another Sci-Fi classic. I'm just blown away at how he makes me care so damn much about the people in his head. This was a more mature offering from Howey, but it wasn't gratuitous. The more Ok. It's pretty much blasphemy to say this, but I truly felt that Sand was even better than Wool. Every time I think Hugh Howey has hit his stride, he puts something out that elevates his writing even more. His character development is masterful, as always. His world-building is top notch, and he has written another Sci-Fi classic. I'm just blown away at how he makes me care so damn much about the people in his head. This was a more mature offering from Howey, but it wasn't gratuitous. The more (and by more I mean not much and not terribly graphic) adult language and themes added a depth to the story that wasn't really present in a lot of his previous work. Sand was far more gritty and real-feeling. Bravo, sir!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katie.g

    Two and a half gritty, sand-filled stars. A world covered in sand. Cities buried hundreds of metres below, in silent sandy graves. Fortunately for the people of this land there are plenty of things to salvage from its sandy depths. Sand divers risk their lives to "dive" down to these cities, making a living from the loot they find there. Unfortunately, that is about the only positive of living in such a desolate world. The land is harsh and unforgiving. The community battles daily against the ev Two and a half gritty, sand-filled stars. A world covered in sand. Cities buried hundreds of metres below, in silent sandy graves. Fortunately for the people of this land there are plenty of things to salvage from its sandy depths. Sand divers risk their lives to "dive" down to these cities, making a living from the loot they find there. Unfortunately, that is about the only positive of living in such a desolate world. The land is harsh and unforgiving. The community battles daily against the ever-advancing wave of sand which threatens to bury their small towns. The story focuses on one family who have been struggling to survive ever since their father took to no mans land years earlier, never to be seen again. This book had great potential with interesting and unique ideas. The technology used for diving under the sand was well thought out and was highly interesting. Unfortunately, the rest of the novel did not live up to my expectations. Having heard a lot of good things about this author, I was expecting to be blown away by his story-telling. Sadly, I felt a little let down. The first disappointment came after spending a fair bit of money on an ebook which I quickly realised was less than three hundred pages, despite it being five books in one. The second was that I didn't feel any connection to the characters and it was a bit of an effort to trek through the story. There were parts that caught my interest. The society is rather brutal and unforgiving at times, like the sand, and the author doesn't have any qualms abut killing anyone off. But inbetween these fast-paced sections the story plods along with barely any substance. Some people are offended by the frequent f-bombs that are dropped but that didn't bother me. What did bother me was the lack of world-building and motives behind the villains. After reading it I'm still not sure what they were hoping to achieve. The ending dropped off suddenly which left me feeling a little lost. I'm not sure if there's supposed to be a sequel or not but it was so open-ended that it didn't feel quite finished to me. This book has earned two and a half stars for its creative ideas, detail on the dives and the gritty reality of a society living under such pressures. I enjoyed it but at times it was a frustrating read, promising something great but then not delivering. If I do decide to read anything else by Hugh Howey, I will do so with trepidation.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    Update - I just read on Twitter that HH is working on a sequel. Finally!! Original review: I find myself torn on the rating I want to give this book. The problem I have is that I don't know if this is the first in a series of omnibuses like in the Wool/Silo series. If it's done, totally finished, then I would give it a three. If it's just the beginning, then it is a five. I just have so many questions at this point. Entirely too many for a complete story. As for the story itself, it was written by Update - I just read on Twitter that HH is working on a sequel. Finally!! Original review: I find myself torn on the rating I want to give this book. The problem I have is that I don't know if this is the first in a series of omnibuses like in the Wool/Silo series. If it's done, totally finished, then I would give it a three. If it's just the beginning, then it is a five. I just have so many questions at this point. Entirely too many for a complete story. As for the story itself, it was written by Hugh Howey so you just know you won't be able to put the book down. He's introduced the science of being able to dive in sand via an electric suit. Perhaps this is based on current science. Seems plausible. There are a few things that I don't understand...like where they get their food. Since they live in dunes, I don't know how they could produce anything or care for livestock. Also, I don't know how cities could be buried under hundreds and hundreds of feet of sand. Where did this incredible amount of sand come from? If it hadn't have been made certain that this story was on Earth, I would have thought it was Arakis (sorry Dune lovers, no worm in this story). See, too many questions. I have read a few of his other stories and I know he likes to leave those endings that don't really end the story. The ones where you imagine it for yourself. I have my fingers crossed that this isn't one of them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Clouds

    Picked it up at a car boot sale for £1!

  21. 4 out of 5

    April Sarah

    Video Review: https://youtu.be/72uJN_UDsgE Video Review: https://youtu.be/72uJN_UDsgE

  22. 5 out of 5

    Otherwyrld

    Sand is one of those high concept thought experiment stories so beloved in Science Fiction, a modern-day "what if?" story that dares to ask a very difficult question but then succeeds or fails on the answer it provides. In this respect, the book quite possibly fails because in the end the sum of its parts didn't add up to a whole. (view spoiler)[ I found it impossible to believe that any mining operation, no matter how large, could bury the whole of Colorado (and possibly more) under 1000 metres Sand is one of those high concept thought experiment stories so beloved in Science Fiction, a modern-day "what if?" story that dares to ask a very difficult question but then succeeds or fails on the answer it provides. In this respect, the book quite possibly fails because in the end the sum of its parts didn't add up to a whole. (view spoiler)[ I found it impossible to believe that any mining operation, no matter how large, could bury the whole of Colorado (and possibly more) under 1000 metres of waste sand. The motivations of the rulers of this operation is suspect - why would they destroy a free source of labour by detonating a nuclear bomb over the area? Finally, why would a single bomb delivered to those rulers succeed in shutting down the mining operation, and allow it to rain over Colorado for the first time in hundreds or thousands of years. (hide spoiler)] Where this story succeeds though is in the characterisation and world building evident in every page. I make no secret that for me these are two of the most important parts of a story and without them I would not enjoy the plot nearly as much. In both cases the author succeeds admirably - you get a real feel for how difficult the lives are for these people, and you can almost feel the sand rubbing it's implacable way under your skin. The family whose various stories form the bulk of the plot are very well written - if these stories seem to intersect in rather unbelievable ways at times does not make them any less interesting to read. You get a real sense that these people have suffered, something that is especially true of the female members of the family, who have had an incredibly raw deal. The male members, being younger, have had more time to adapt to their changing circumstances and have the flexibility of youth to cope with it, but even they are not exempt from this suffering. I mentioned in the spoiler above that there is an explanation for all the sand, but in a way it might have made a better story to have left this unexplained, though this would have left the book without it's climactic (or is that climatic?) finale. This would have left the well-written scenes of diving through sand to the buried skyscrapers of the old world far beneath them to pull up treasures - Samsonite cases full of clothes, coffee makers, plate glass and thousands of tons of metal, but without an ending it would have just petered out. This is a quest story, and every quest needs to have it's Mount Doom to make it worthwhile, and this book is no exception. One last thought I had was that this was in some respects an anti-government story, which at times left me feeling slightly uneasy (British people tend to have more faith in government than our American cousins). The independent and plucky sand people are being beaten down and oppressed by an unseeing and uncaring distant government whose selfishness and short-sightedness ruins the lives of small people far away. This may be a projection on my part though as we know nothing about these distant rulers, who may just as well be a asset-stripping major corporation as a federal government. Leaving this part ambiguous leaves people to assign their own villains here though. This is an intriguing and inventive world that the author has created and while I would like to read more stories set in this world, the book also stands on its own and complete. 4 stars

  23. 5 out of 5

    Liam || Books 'n Beards

    Ugh. I could not finish this. This book made me so sad, because I absolutely loved the Silo trilogy. Sand, however, was a chore to sit through - however much of it I did. The starting concept - the world is buried in sand and there's these sand divers who, you know, dive in the sand, is real neat - but this both isn't explored enough, and can't save the rest of it. Incredibly awkward, unlikable characters and dialogue, unbelievable dialogue moreover, and just... I don't even know, I'm just so disa Ugh. I could not finish this. This book made me so sad, because I absolutely loved the Silo trilogy. Sand, however, was a chore to sit through - however much of it I did. The starting concept - the world is buried in sand and there's these sand divers who, you know, dive in the sand, is real neat - but this both isn't explored enough, and can't save the rest of it. Incredibly awkward, unlikable characters and dialogue, unbelievable dialogue moreover, and just... I don't even know, I'm just so disappointed with it. It leaned fairly heavily on huge chunks of clunky, expository prose or dialogue, whereas the Silo novels, information was given to you fairly gracefully. Like, the little footnotes explaining what all the different bloody words for sand mean? "Sand that has collected on one's glasses" "Sand that has collected in one's shoe" "Wet sand", like really? We know what "mush" means, and even if it means something specific, the readers are probably intelligent enough to figure out that when referring to sand, mush means wet (MUSHY) sand. Oh, the mother owns/works in a brothel? Better have reams of sappy bullshit about how hard her life is. Better have the daughter flashing back to when she was nearly raped. Please. If I gave a shit about any of these characters, maybe that would have been emotionally effective in any way. So no, I do not recommend Sand. If the book couldn't grab my attention in a way that didn't annoy and exhasperate me by page 270 then I doubt the last 100 pages would change my mind.

  24. 4 out of 5

    WarpDrive

    I really wanted to like Sand more than I actually did, as I loved SO MUCH the "Silo" Series by this author (it simply was a masterpiece). With Sand, it initially looked to me like Howey managed to create another similarly haunting, gloomy and gripping world: after devouring the first 50 pages, I was totally into it, I was completely into the story and curious where Howey was going to take his characters. The storyline is well developed, the characters are nuanced and credible in their contradict I really wanted to like Sand more than I actually did, as I loved SO MUCH the "Silo" Series by this author (it simply was a masterpiece). With Sand, it initially looked to me like Howey managed to create another similarly haunting, gloomy and gripping world: after devouring the first 50 pages, I was totally into it, I was completely into the story and curious where Howey was going to take his characters. The storyline is well developed, the characters are nuanced and credible in their contradictions and complexity, and the harshness of life in this unforgiving environment is beautifully pictured. However, there are probably too many characters, the environment is not as credible and beautifully detailed like in the Silo Series, and the finale is not satisfactory - the book feels like there's supposed to be more, it feels unfinished and there are just too many unanswered questions and underdeveloped themes. A nice book, make no mistake, but I must regretfully say that it does not seem, to me, to have reached the heights of the Silo series. Maybe I had too high expectations from the start, and I might have given this book at least a full 4 stars, had not been for this initial bias of mine. 3.5 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Ward

    I finished Sand this morning and was surprised to find a tear. I've wanted to cry from reading a book before, and did at the end of listening to 11/22/63, but never have while reading someone else's fiction. Sand Omnibus did that. I'm not sure I could give a stronger recommendation. Sand is King of the Hill for 2014's reading crops, and while it's early, I expect it to be up there for a good while. Full review at Adventures in Scifi Publishing: http://www.adventuresinscifipublishin... I finished Sand this morning and was surprised to find a tear. I've wanted to cry from reading a book before, and did at the end of listening to 11/22/63, but never have while reading someone else's fiction. Sand Omnibus did that. I'm not sure I could give a stronger recommendation. Sand is King of the Hill for 2014's reading crops, and while it's early, I expect it to be up there for a good while. Full review at Adventures in Scifi Publishing: http://www.adventuresinscifipublishin...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Justin Brendel

    I tried my hardest not to compare this book to the Silo trilogy, but I ended up doing that anyways. Sand just lacked something for me. Maybe locations felt weak to me, and I couldn't attach myself to the settings. Silo trilogy had a vivid world painted that I felt. OK, enough comparing. I wanted the story to hold more on Palmer once he found Danvar. I wanted him to be trapped for longer, stewing on how to plot the escape. But then, a mysterious stranger appeared conveniently, which provided him a I tried my hardest not to compare this book to the Silo trilogy, but I ended up doing that anyways. Sand just lacked something for me. Maybe locations felt weak to me, and I couldn't attach myself to the settings. Silo trilogy had a vivid world painted that I felt. OK, enough comparing. I wanted the story to hold more on Palmer once he found Danvar. I wanted him to be trapped for longer, stewing on how to plot the escape. But then, a mysterious stranger appeared conveniently, which provided him a chance to escape. Felt like a cop-out to me. I loved the premise of a post-apocalyptic world where sand is king. Hugh Howey's writing did hook me in to the dirty, grittiness of this world. I can imagine your teeth wearing away from constantly ingesting sand. Overall, good, not great for me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Freda Malone

    Much like Wool, Hugh Howey gives us a different version of a human ant farm, only with no water and a ton of sand to keep you thirsty throughout the whole book. Sand cities named so closely to the old world of cities that sound like Denver, Colorado and Colorado Springs gave a whole new meaning for me since I happen to live in Denver. Sand divers with suits and technology to move sand, scavenge for goods for coin or trade, was an interesting way for some to survive. A deep gash in the earth know Much like Wool, Hugh Howey gives us a different version of a human ant farm, only with no water and a ton of sand to keep you thirsty throughout the whole book. Sand cities named so closely to the old world of cities that sound like Denver, Colorado and Colorado Springs gave a whole new meaning for me since I happen to live in Denver. Sand divers with suits and technology to move sand, scavenge for goods for coin or trade, was an interesting way for some to survive. A deep gash in the earth known as no man's land, where many have crossed and never returned, is the focal point and hardly is what it seems to be. There are thieves, bandits, and cannibals to watch for but for the wind and sand blowing all the time, it could be your luck or your curse. I really enjoyed the family in this story. The mother, Rose. The sons, Rob, Palmer and Connor and the daughter Vic, who pretty much go off on their own to survive and then brought together again later as they try to save each other. Hugh Howey is not for everyone but his stories are so unique from any other apocalyptic books I've read, it is hard to not pick one up. It also gives me a good respite from my regular murder mysteries and detective reads. I think I liked Wool a tad more though.

  28. 5 out of 5

    TraceyL

    A post-apocalyptic world where the earth has been covered with sand. I loved how Howey treated sand like water. There are sand divers who use special suits to travel downwards to the buried cities and scavenge for supplies. There's a sand wall which was built to protect the town from the incoming dunes. People who travel past the wall risk drowning in the desert. Howey has always been great at building unique worlds, then setting his stories within them. Great read. A post-apocalyptic world where the earth has been covered with sand. I loved how Howey treated sand like water. There are sand divers who use special suits to travel downwards to the buried cities and scavenge for supplies. There's a sand wall which was built to protect the town from the incoming dunes. People who travel past the wall risk drowning in the desert. Howey has always been great at building unique worlds, then setting his stories within them. Great read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Weaver-Smith

    I wanted to bury this book in a dune somewhere because it's just not worth the coin. I thought I would enjoy this like I did Wool, but it was about as easy to read as it is to run a mile on the beach. It was slow going, and I felt little motivation to complete it. Sand is about family, justifying the things we do for our families to earn a living and also to keep ourselves afloat in the midst of all life blows our way. It's about how we cope after an unexpected loss and always hoping there's some I wanted to bury this book in a dune somewhere because it's just not worth the coin. I thought I would enjoy this like I did Wool, but it was about as easy to read as it is to run a mile on the beach. It was slow going, and I felt little motivation to complete it. Sand is about family, justifying the things we do for our families to earn a living and also to keep ourselves afloat in the midst of all life blows our way. It's about how we cope after an unexpected loss and always hoping there's something better out there for us. Out of all the problematic worlds I've read about, Hugh Howey has managed to create the one I would most likely not be able to tolerate. I might survive the world of Sand, but my sanity would not. Sand isn't horrible because of a ferocious government, corrupted societal laws, or a declining ecosystem, though. I could not live in this world because of all the freaking sand everywhere. Always in my mouth, in my shoes, in my house, and forever sweeping and shoveling just for the wind to inevitably bring it back to me. No thanks. Howey let loose in Sand with a mass of explicit vocabulary and not much, but just enough graphic imagery of bodies horrifically mangled, leaving plenty of unwanted images in my mind. I don't mind a little language here and there or things of graphic nature when I'm anticipating it, but the way it leaped of the pages so unexpectedly left me in a state of shock. I never felt tied to the characters, and I had trouble easing into the flow of this whole world. On a more positive note, there were a few good things I noted: 1. It was not predictable. No shocking endings or anything crazy, but there was not much of a basis to predict anything from. This could have been from the lack of foundation we had, though. 2. I've never read anything like it. The first section of the omnibus seemed like it was going to be just like Wool, too, which would have upset me. His world was not based off of any dystopian formula I've seen before, so we can commend him for that. 3. His ideas were clever. And honestly, they weren't poorly constructed. Scuba diving through sand as one would through water made sense. I thought having the characters scavenge beneath their town for buried cities was probably the coolest thing about this book. 4. There are nuggets of universal wisdom scattered everywhere. "Witnessing the aftermath of the destruction made the danger...real. Fear required precedents." I love being able to dismantle a quote from the text and be able to apply it to life in general. I can't say I haven't learned anything from reading Sand, but my time spent reading it could have easily been better spent. I did not enjoy it, and for that I had to give it a 3/5. One thing I hope all who have read it or decide not to read it based on this review take away is we are all just grains of sand, helpless to where the wind takes us, drifting from one dune to the next. We are spit out, shaken from boots, and brushed off from shoulders, but we are the foundation of society.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sad Sunday (If I say it's bad, it's bad)

    What Hugh Howey wants for Christmas? A Silo where he can keep all his Sand and Wool. What is Sand about? Sand. What Hugh Howey has for breakfast? Apocalypse. OK, you hand enough of my sand up. Time to review books. I read this one in Lithuanian and the translation was quite poor. Many sentences were translate literally, keeping their English structure (and that reads funny). I even caught a grammar mistake! And I am not sure, but the whole book and sentences where somehow chopped - he thinks. He d What Hugh Howey wants for Christmas? A Silo where he can keep all his Sand and Wool. What is Sand about? Sand. What Hugh Howey has for breakfast? Apocalypse. OK, you hand enough of my sand up. Time to review books. I read this one in Lithuanian and the translation was quite poor. Many sentences were translate literally, keeping their English structure (and that reads funny). I even caught a grammar mistake! And I am not sure, but the whole book and sentences where somehow chopped - he thinks. He did that. He wondered. Because it must be. He went there. I read a few of Howey's books and he is a little bit more wordy in usual circumstances. I liked the overall idea a lot. Howey seems to have a passion for apocalypse&co. scenarios, so I am always curious to see what he will write next (even if his book order is confusing as hell, even now I am not 100% sure if I finished Wool or not. Or was it Shift? Omnibus?). In Sand he masterfully combines family drama, dramatic characters and cool environment. The "fill the blanks yourself" storytelling is a bit annoying but survivable. Overall impressions are... sandy

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