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Where is the handbook for widows? Mary Kenyon lamented as she planned a funeral for the beloved husband whose triumph over cancer she chronicled in "Chemo-Therapist: How Cancer Cured a Marriage." During the ensuing weeks, as she attempted to make sense of his untimely death, she filled two journals, blogged, and read the inspirational writings of others who had gone down t Where is the handbook for widows? Mary Kenyon lamented as she planned a funeral for the beloved husband whose triumph over cancer she chronicled in "Chemo-Therapist: How Cancer Cured a Marriage." During the ensuing weeks, as she attempted to make sense of his untimely death, she filled two journals, blogged, and read the inspirational writings of others who had gone down the road of grief before her, authors like C.S. Lewis and Madeleine L 'Engle. She eventually found herself studying grief and bereavement in her quest to unearth answers to alleviating the pain associated with profound loss. In the process, she discovered a strength and emotional reserve she didn't know she had, along with an evolving faith that helped her face the impending loss of an eight-year-old grandson. "In the midst of the darkness of loss, I found light. Admittedly, in those first weeks, it might have been but a single small spark I sensed deep inside of me, but that spark guided me in the twisted, dark journey of grief. As I stumbled over the roots of hopelessness and despair, that light grew to illuminate my path, a path I sometimes felt very alone on. At some point in the journey I'd turned around, and there was God. That is grace."


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Where is the handbook for widows? Mary Kenyon lamented as she planned a funeral for the beloved husband whose triumph over cancer she chronicled in "Chemo-Therapist: How Cancer Cured a Marriage." During the ensuing weeks, as she attempted to make sense of his untimely death, she filled two journals, blogged, and read the inspirational writings of others who had gone down t Where is the handbook for widows? Mary Kenyon lamented as she planned a funeral for the beloved husband whose triumph over cancer she chronicled in "Chemo-Therapist: How Cancer Cured a Marriage." During the ensuing weeks, as she attempted to make sense of his untimely death, she filled two journals, blogged, and read the inspirational writings of others who had gone down the road of grief before her, authors like C.S. Lewis and Madeleine L 'Engle. She eventually found herself studying grief and bereavement in her quest to unearth answers to alleviating the pain associated with profound loss. In the process, she discovered a strength and emotional reserve she didn't know she had, along with an evolving faith that helped her face the impending loss of an eight-year-old grandson. "In the midst of the darkness of loss, I found light. Admittedly, in those first weeks, it might have been but a single small spark I sensed deep inside of me, but that spark guided me in the twisted, dark journey of grief. As I stumbled over the roots of hopelessness and despair, that light grew to illuminate my path, a path I sometimes felt very alone on. At some point in the journey I'd turned around, and there was God. That is grace."

58 review for Refined by Fire: A Journey of Grief and Grace

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hanson

    I cannot imagine what it would be like to lose a mother, a beloved spouse of over thirty years, and a precious grandson, all within less than three years and after all three had been diagnosed and treated for various forms of cancer. None of us could imagine this happening in our family, nor would we wish an experience like this on anyone. Mary Potter Kenyon is a remarkable writer; she honestly takes us through her journey of loss, sharing her deepest aches and her daily struggles while grieving I cannot imagine what it would be like to lose a mother, a beloved spouse of over thirty years, and a precious grandson, all within less than three years and after all three had been diagnosed and treated for various forms of cancer. None of us could imagine this happening in our family, nor would we wish an experience like this on anyone. Mary Potter Kenyon is a remarkable writer; she honestly takes us through her journey of loss, sharing her deepest aches and her daily struggles while grieving the deaths of dear family members. Ms. Kenyon does not abandon her readers in this valley of grief, however. Ms. Kenyon moves through feelings of anguish and sorrow, envy and bitterness, to accept and rely upon the peace, grace, and mercies of God. With God's help, she is able to carve out a new life for herself and her family. It is not a life that she would have chosen, but a new life of hope, humor, and joy. I am so grateful to Mary Potter Kenyon for generously sharing her story. Brava!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Let me begin by saying this book deserves much more than 5 stars. I knew that if I began reading it, I wouldn't be able to stop until the last page, so I waited a day and a half before starting it. This book is beautiful in every way- just gorgeous. Mary is a very talented writer who is so transparent with the feelings she experienced in the days leading up to the loss of her husband and grandson, and the period directly after. This book is tender and raw. I didn't get halfway through before tea Let me begin by saying this book deserves much more than 5 stars. I knew that if I began reading it, I wouldn't be able to stop until the last page, so I waited a day and a half before starting it. This book is beautiful in every way- just gorgeous. Mary is a very talented writer who is so transparent with the feelings she experienced in the days leading up to the loss of her husband and grandson, and the period directly after. This book is tender and raw. I didn't get halfway through before tears were streaming down my face. In reading this book, I think you will learn many things. Among them the true meaning of love and grace...and that life after great loss is possible. Thank you, Mary, for being so honest and willing to share your story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kim Harms

    Mary Potter Kenyon has a way with story. She is about as “real” a writer as I’ve ever read. Transparent and unashamed to let the reader into the hard stuff in her life. Thankfully I can’t relate to her losses, but if/when I find myself grieving, I will probably pick this book back up and let Mary’s words soothe my soul. God has allowed significant hurt in her life. He has also gifted her with the ability to string words together on paper in such a way that you feel like she is right there in the Mary Potter Kenyon has a way with story. She is about as “real” a writer as I’ve ever read. Transparent and unashamed to let the reader into the hard stuff in her life. Thankfully I can’t relate to her losses, but if/when I find myself grieving, I will probably pick this book back up and let Mary’s words soothe my soul. God has allowed significant hurt in her life. He has also gifted her with the ability to string words together on paper in such a way that you feel like she is right there in the room with you. She took the hurt and the gift and turned it into an amazing book. I highly recommend it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joy Kidney

    What an honest and raw pilgrimage through losses of three of the author's closest family members. When Mary Kenyon's husband died, she wondered where she could find a handbook for widows? In essence, she has written a powerful one. She also suffered the loss of her mother--and of a young grandson--within a few short years. How does a woman endure, survive, and even thrive in spite of the grief and confusion. Mary poignantly shares her hesitant but purposeful steps, eventually leading to God and What an honest and raw pilgrimage through losses of three of the author's closest family members. When Mary Kenyon's husband died, she wondered where she could find a handbook for widows? In essence, she has written a powerful one. She also suffered the loss of her mother--and of a young grandson--within a few short years. How does a woman endure, survive, and even thrive in spite of the grief and confusion. Mary poignantly shares her hesitant but purposeful steps, eventually leading to God and to redemptive purpose. Anyone dealing with deep grief would find a heart connection in this moving account.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Therese Tappouni

    “Refined by Fire” by Mary Potter Kenyon has as its subtitle “A Journey of Grief and Grace.” That’s exactly what this book is, but it takes a totally human track through the process. The author shares her raw emotions at the loss of her beloved husband and then her grandchild. She is not modeling a Pollyanna attitude, even though her journey takes her to a strong faith in God and prayer. She shares her very dark moments and then we join her as a burst of clarity and light arrives. For anyone who g “Refined by Fire” by Mary Potter Kenyon has as its subtitle “A Journey of Grief and Grace.” That’s exactly what this book is, but it takes a totally human track through the process. The author shares her raw emotions at the loss of her beloved husband and then her grandchild. She is not modeling a Pollyanna attitude, even though her journey takes her to a strong faith in God and prayer. She shares her very dark moments and then we join her as a burst of clarity and light arrives. For anyone who grieves, the roller-coaster of the process will be real and honest and shows us we are not alone. This is a woman of strength and power and we trust her sharing of the Truth of her life. Therese Tappouni, author of "The Gifts of Grief: Finding Light in the Darkness of Loss"

  6. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    Refined By Fire: A Journey of Grief and Grace is author Mary Potter Kenyon's memoir of sorts about the tremendous loss she endured during a very short period of time: of her mother, husband, and young grandson. The book description reads: "Where is the handbook for widows?" Mary Kenyon lamented as she planned a funeral for the beloved husband whose triumph over cancer she chronicled in Chemo-Therapist: How Cancer Cured a Marriage. During the ensuing weeks, as she attempted to make sense of his un Refined By Fire: A Journey of Grief and Grace is author Mary Potter Kenyon's memoir of sorts about the tremendous loss she endured during a very short period of time: of her mother, husband, and young grandson. The book description reads: "Where is the handbook for widows?" Mary Kenyon lamented as she planned a funeral for the beloved husband whose triumph over cancer she chronicled in Chemo-Therapist: How Cancer Cured a Marriage. During the ensuing weeks, as she attempted to make sense of his untimely death, she filled two journals, blogged, and read the inspirational writings of others who had gone down the road of grief before her--authors like C.S. Lewis and Madeleine L'Engle. She eventually found herself studying grief and bereavement in her quest to unearth answers to alleviating the pain associated with profound loss. In the process, she discovered a strength and emotional reserve she didn't know she had, along with an evolving faith that helped her face the impending loss of an eight-year-old grandson. "In the midst of the darkness of loss, I found light. Admittedly, in those first weeks, it might have been but a single small spark I sensed deep inside of me, but that spark guided me in the twisted, dark journey of grief. As I stumbled over the roots of hopelessness and despair, that light grew to illuminate my path, a path I sometimes felt very alone on. At some point in the journey I'd turned around, and there was God. That is grace." This book was markedly sadder to read than her previous book, Chemo-Therapist: How Cancer Cured a Marriage. Chemo-Therapist focused on how her husband's cancer healed and improved their marriage relationship, whereas Refined By Fire focused on the grief process Mary went through throughout her tremendous losses. However, although parts made me weep (especially her young grandson's cancer and death), it was a wonderful book. I read it in less than 24 hours because I just couldn't put it down. Mary intersperses journal entries that she wrote at different points and stages of grief throughout the book, and I found those lovely and was happy she decided to include these private writings, because I feel they could be so helpful to someone who's recently suffered a loss - to see that their feelings are normal, and to get an idea of what to expect throughout the process of grief. She also includes excellent resources for those dealing with a loss. This is a must-read book for anyone going through a difficult loss, or anyone who enjoys reading memoirs. I received a copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lane Willson

    I hate the word “closure”. Especially as it relates to coping with life’s more difficult circumstances. The death of a loved one, a violent assault, the carnage of war, a potentially lethal disease, and many other experiences, leave one’s life forever changed. The idea that such an event is something that one can get over and leave behind is ludicrous. Perspective, a much better term to my mind, is what I found in Refined by Fire: A Journey of Grief and Grace by Mary Potter Kenyon. She tells her I hate the word “closure”. Especially as it relates to coping with life’s more difficult circumstances. The death of a loved one, a violent assault, the carnage of war, a potentially lethal disease, and many other experiences, leave one’s life forever changed. The idea that such an event is something that one can get over and leave behind is ludicrous. Perspective, a much better term to my mind, is what I found in Refined by Fire: A Journey of Grief and Grace by Mary Potter Kenyon. She tells her story of losing her husband, followed very quickly by a grandson. The most powerful element of Refined by Fire was the way it communicated how lost Mrs. Potter Kenyon felt. One of her most important and familiar ebenezers, her husband, was no longer standing and could offer no help in finding her bearings. While still lost in grief’s wilderness, to then lose a grandson unimaginable. Postings from Mrs. Potter Kenyon’s blog are sprinkled through her journey and offer poignant emphasis to her attempts to comprehend the her loss. My metallurgy is not what it once was, but I don't recall a single analogy, description, or theme related to the art of metallurgy in Refined by Fire. Not one! Actually, that’s not true. My metallurgy remains as sharp as ever, and what it has always been - nonexistent. In fairness to Mrs. Potter Kenyon, I’m always in the process of reading several books, and bouncing between them as a way to combat my ADD and dyslexia. Details are sometimes lost in this process. Ultimately, no analogies are needed. Mrs. Potter Kenyon’s description of the firestorm created by the her loss is so real and easily understood. Likewise, her refinement, the understanding, faith, and perspective gained by her loss, are clear markers of the love that remains. Death is no match.

  8. 4 out of 5

    W. Whalin

    Mary Potter Kenyon has been through incredible loss in a short period of time--her mother, a grandchild and her husband, David. Throughout this book, Mary shares her personal journals and the journey. How did she not only survive but flourished in the midst of grief? It's clear that she clung to Jesus and the Bible throughout the book. Her journey provides a road map for readers who walk through their own grief and loss. The writing is moving and personal. The final paragraph of the final chapter Mary Potter Kenyon has been through incredible loss in a short period of time--her mother, a grandchild and her husband, David. Throughout this book, Mary shares her personal journals and the journey. How did she not only survive but flourished in the midst of grief? It's clear that she clung to Jesus and the Bible throughout the book. Her journey provides a road map for readers who walk through their own grief and loss. The writing is moving and personal. The final paragraph of the final chapter summarizes Mary's experience and I believe captures the essence of REFINED BY FIRE. "In the midst of the darkness of loss, I found light. Admittedly, in those first weeks, it might have been but a single small spark, I sensed deep inside of me, but that spark guided me in the twisted, dark journey of grief. As I stumbled over the roots of hopelessness and despair, that light grew to illuminate my path, a path I sometimes felt very alone on. At some point in the journey I'd turned around, and there was God. That is grace." I highly recommend this book. Whether you are going through loss yourself or you need a solid gift for a friend or you are a pastor or counselor, you will find reading this book a healing experience.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    They say if a book makes you cry it's a good book. Mary Potter Kenyon's memoir chronicling her journey through grief made me cry in a good way. Mary does what good authors do--writes with honesty and makes herself vulnerable. The subtitle of her book really tells the story--A Journey of Grief and Grace. In the span of three years Mary's mother, husband of 30+ years, and an eight-year-old grandson died. She doesn't soft pedal how dark and difficult those days were and how navigating the first wee They say if a book makes you cry it's a good book. Mary Potter Kenyon's memoir chronicling her journey through grief made me cry in a good way. Mary does what good authors do--writes with honesty and makes herself vulnerable. The subtitle of her book really tells the story--A Journey of Grief and Grace. In the span of three years Mary's mother, husband of 30+ years, and an eight-year-old grandson died. She doesn't soft pedal how dark and difficult those days were and how navigating the first weeks and months drew on a strength she did not know she possessed. Choosing to be grateful for what she'd had with each of her departed loved ones and finding reasons to continue living did not erase, but did ease her grief. Grief changed her into a more empathetic, grace-filled person and for her willingness to share her story, this reader is grateful.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    Mary Potter Kenyon allows her readers a look into the first year of her life after losing her precious husband, David, coupled with losing her grandson just a short time later. Her writing is real and raw, but more importantly it is filled with glimpses of the grace that has touched her life and transformed her since the time of her husband's death. I can attest to the reality of her writing, as I lost my husband less than a month after Mary's loss. I hope you will all take time to read her book Mary Potter Kenyon allows her readers a look into the first year of her life after losing her precious husband, David, coupled with losing her grandson just a short time later. Her writing is real and raw, but more importantly it is filled with glimpses of the grace that has touched her life and transformed her since the time of her husband's death. I can attest to the reality of her writing, as I lost my husband less than a month after Mary's loss. I hope you will all take time to read her book. I think it will help you to understand loss if you have not experienced it, and it may comfort you if you are in the midst of your own loss.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kayo

    Nice reading. Really enjoyed this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jimmie Aaron Kepler

    I bought and read the Kindle Edition of Refined by Fire: A Journey of Grief and Grace by Mary Potter Kenyon. Having my mother pass away in December 2014, my father dies in June 2017, and cancer takes my wife of 43.5 years in April 2018, I have experienced grief and still am. The author has walked the grief highway and shares not only her experience and insights buts help the reader be aware what they may encounter on the journey. One area I could relate to was my concern for how my children were I bought and read the Kindle Edition of Refined by Fire: A Journey of Grief and Grace by Mary Potter Kenyon. Having my mother pass away in December 2014, my father dies in June 2017, and cancer takes my wife of 43.5 years in April 2018, I have experienced grief and still am. The author has walked the grief highway and shares not only her experience and insights buts help the reader be aware what they may encounter on the journey. One area I could relate to was my concern for how my children were handling grief and I felt need to take their feeling into consideration when I made choices I knew would impact my family. Starting new traditions for Thanksgiving and Christmas were a struggle for me. I had my middle child, then 38, graduate from seminary earning a master’s degree just three weeks after my wife’s death. One of my wife’s goals had been to live to see him walk across the stage. Five weeks before the graduation while she was in hospice she said she wouldn’t make it and my heart broke realizing death was imminent. I drove across country in May 2020 to attend a writer’s conference. During the drive I started talking, forgetting my wife was deceased. I drove past a Cracker Barrel Resturant between Birmingham and Huntsville Alabama I said we had stopped there to eat on several previous trips to see her sister that lives in eastern Tennessee. I had to pull over and cry for about fifteen minutes. Mary sharing similar events in her book had me realizing my experience was normal for me and needed Kleenex to get through the book which I found hard to read - not because of the writing, but because of the memories reading caused me to relive. I recommend the book. Read in August 2020.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Lewis

    Motivated by her own loss, the author, Mary Potter Kenyon inspires the reader to work through the grieving process with hope and faith. God has said our lives would not be easy, and losing a loved one brings the pain forward to a level we can not comprehend. Kenyon elegantly describes her journey, and how the God's grace helped her through the most difficult time in her life. Motivated by her own loss, the author, Mary Potter Kenyon inspires the reader to work through the grieving process with hope and faith. God has said our lives would not be easy, and losing a loved one brings the pain forward to a level we can not comprehend. Kenyon elegantly describes her journey, and how the God's grace helped her through the most difficult time in her life.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carla Marie

    A most beautiful book! A must-read for anyone who is moving through the grieving process! Written with such heart and wisdom!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mona

    I flew through the pages, barely stopping to eat, use the bathroom or even breathe. I didn't want to stop to do the necessary things in life until I finished. But I almost felt guilty reading Refined by Fire. Why guilty? Mary’s private thoughts, pains, anger and glimpses of happiness were written in such a way I felt like I was spying on her. Was I an intruder in her home? Was I the proverbial fly on the wall, seeing and hearing all the conversations, both those spoken aloud and those in her he I flew through the pages, barely stopping to eat, use the bathroom or even breathe. I didn't want to stop to do the necessary things in life until I finished. But I almost felt guilty reading Refined by Fire. Why guilty? Mary’s private thoughts, pains, anger and glimpses of happiness were written in such a way I felt like I was spying on her. Was I an intruder in her home? Was I the proverbial fly on the wall, seeing and hearing all the conversations, both those spoken aloud and those in her head? Mary’s book shared her path of grief after she lost her mother, her beloved husband and her grandson within a few short years. She writes clearly about the process of joining the world of the living, slowly and painfully until she gets cut off at the knees for the second and then a third time. I felt her heart shatter and the physical pain that comes from such a loss. Yes, this book has very sad things to say. It is about death, grief and loss, but more importantly it is about hope. I was allowed to follow along as Mary went through her stages of extreme sadness until she came to the conclusion she was strong enough to go on with life. She illustrated how she came to that place. I felt myself rooting for her, as much as if I was at a high school football state championship game. I enjoyed the quotes she included from books she read that helped her as she walked the path alone. The sources were listed so I could go and read them for myself. She also included her own journal entries as she waded through the muddy waters of her emotions. Both gave me insight. I think this book would be helpful for anyone who grieves the loss of a loved one. Most everyone experiences a loss during a lifetime: a parent, a spouse, a child, a grandchild or a close friend. Mary's journey speaks to all paths of grief. I recommend picking up a copy, reading it for yourself, whether you are in the grieving process or not. It is a story of one woman’s resiliency in dealing with the messiness of life. Share it with a loved one who could use a hand up during a difficult time. I know I plan to share this book as a gift to my friends and relatives when they experience a loss.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jolene

    In Refined by Fire, Mary Kenyon tells a heartbreaking story of loss. In the span of a few years, Kenyon lost her mother Irma and then her husband David. Just as she discovered writing as a way to regain her emotional footing, her young grandson Jacob died of cancer. The author’s story is compelling because of her transparent. She lays her journey of grief before the reader, refusing to hide her emotional pain, her tears, her anger, her loneliness, and her doubts. We see grief take its toll on he In Refined by Fire, Mary Kenyon tells a heartbreaking story of loss. In the span of a few years, Kenyon lost her mother Irma and then her husband David. Just as she discovered writing as a way to regain her emotional footing, her young grandson Jacob died of cancer. The author’s story is compelling because of her transparent. She lays her journey of grief before the reader, refusing to hide her emotional pain, her tears, her anger, her loneliness, and her doubts. We see grief take its toll on her relationships and especially on her youngest daughter, Abigail, who was just 8 when her father died. Though overwhelmed by grief and shedding tears every morning for years, Kenyon somehow writes her way through her grief. Throughout the book, excerpts from her blog and daily journals are featured. Each entry is a word picture, a snapshot of grief frozen in time. Between those entries, the reader sees grief melt and morph and reform as Kenyon questions God and hears him answer in sweet and unexpected ways. Though devastated by her losses, she begins to see God at work in her life. Her heart is still broken at the end of the book, but thanks to her determination to cling to God, she is also stronger and more capable than before. Kenyon’s Refined by Fire is essentially “grief handbook” for those dealing with loss, something Kenyon wished for as she grieved. It is also a useful tool and resource for pastors, grief support group leaders, hospice workers, funeral home directors, and anyone working with people dealing with grief.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jerri Iehl

    When I agreed to write a review of Mary Potter Kenyon’s book “Refined by Fire A Journey of Grief and Grace,” I really wasn’t aware of what the book was about. I really was trying to attempt to do the honorable thing and help a fellow writer out by promoting her book. But when I received it, I was shocked at the contents. You see, I have been traveling the path of grief since the 3rd of March when my mother passed away. Today, November 6, 2014, is my mother’s birthday, the day that Mary is presen When I agreed to write a review of Mary Potter Kenyon’s book “Refined by Fire A Journey of Grief and Grace,” I really wasn’t aware of what the book was about. I really was trying to attempt to do the honorable thing and help a fellow writer out by promoting her book. But when I received it, I was shocked at the contents. You see, I have been traveling the path of grief since the 3rd of March when my mother passed away. Today, November 6, 2014, is my mother’s birthday, the day that Mary is presenting her book at the Cedar Falls Public Library. After the shock wore off, I finally picked up the book and began reading the pages that Mary had written. The eloquence with which she was able to tell the story of her personal tragedies and how she got through each day was so helpful and encouraging. It gave me faith that I, too, could make it through on my recovery with my loss, not only of my mom, but also my granddaughter that I had lost a few years ago, but still grieve to this day. The strength that Mary conveyed throughout the book, especially in the story of her grandson, touched me greatly. Her book is a definite best seller in my estimation and one that should be read by anyone that is going through the grieving process.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gail Kittleson

    This is no ordinary book about grief. Mary invites you right into her heart, and you end up pulling up a chair and sorting through your own losses. Her story kept me up late, and I'm a dedicated morning person. So many phrases touched me . . ."I felt stupid with grief…a hope for the future." Her honest, heartfelt journey through the fresh sorrow of her husband David's death and the loss of her precious grandson is a road no one desires to travel. But travel it we most likely will. If you've ever This is no ordinary book about grief. Mary invites you right into her heart, and you end up pulling up a chair and sorting through your own losses. Her story kept me up late, and I'm a dedicated morning person. So many phrases touched me . . ."I felt stupid with grief…a hope for the future." Her honest, heartfelt journey through the fresh sorrow of her husband David's death and the loss of her precious grandson is a road no one desires to travel. But travel it we most likely will. If you've ever feared death, lost a loved one, or desired to understand the grieving process, Mary Potter Kenyon has a treasure for you.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angie Shere

    Started to read this last night and couldn't stop until I was done. This isn't a saccharine overly sweet Christian book. I don't like those and won't read them. This one is for real. Real pain and anguish as the writer shares her grief. A woman who loses her mother, her husband, and her grandson within just a few years and has to go on with life even though she doesn't think she can. But she shows us how she survives, adapts, and then becomes a new person. Started to read this last night and couldn't stop until I was done. This isn't a saccharine overly sweet Christian book. I don't like those and won't read them. This one is for real. Real pain and anguish as the writer shares her grief. A woman who loses her mother, her husband, and her grandson within just a few years and has to go on with life even though she doesn't think she can. But she shows us how she survives, adapts, and then becomes a new person.

  20. 4 out of 5

    CompassBookRatings

    To see full review with rated content analysis, please visit http://www.compassbookratings.com/rev... To see full review with rated content analysis, please visit http://www.compassbookratings.com/rev...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Patti West

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary Jedlicka Humston

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Flessner

  25. 5 out of 5

    Winthrop Public

  26. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  27. 5 out of 5

    Martha

  28. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Pillars

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Schafer

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jacki Lottes Webber

  31. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Kenyon

  32. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  33. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  34. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  35. 5 out of 5

    Adylure

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  37. 5 out of 5

    Kaite

  38. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sternby

  40. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  41. 4 out of 5

    Sue

  42. 5 out of 5

    Katie Harder-schauer

  43. 4 out of 5

    Skylar

  44. 5 out of 5

    Trina Pontrelli

  45. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

  46. 5 out of 5

    Carol Mikula

  47. 5 out of 5

    Amy Hunt

  48. 5 out of 5

    Annette

  49. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Laxson

  50. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

  51. 4 out of 5

    Janine Kane

  52. 4 out of 5

    Traci Hearty

  53. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  54. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  55. 4 out of 5

    Maria-amalia Escobar

  56. 4 out of 5

    Antoinette

  57. 5 out of 5

    Beth

  58. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Peterson

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