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Tales of the Jazz Age (Annotated, with Audiobook Access) (Fiction Classics)

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Have you seen „The Great Gatsby”? Why don’t you enter F. Scott’s Fitzgerald's world again? You're in for a treat! Presenting “Tales of the Jazz Age” - collection of F. Scott Fitzgerald's short stories. This tremendous book comes with the following great features: • Complete original text of “Tales of the Jazz Age”; • Free audiobook access; • BONUS - F. Scott Fitzgerald's Infl Have you seen „The Great Gatsby”? Why don’t you enter F. Scott’s Fitzgerald's world again? You're in for a treat! Presenting “Tales of the Jazz Age” - collection of F. Scott Fitzgerald's short stories. This tremendous book comes with the following great features: • Complete original text of “Tales of the Jazz Age”; • Free audiobook access; • BONUS - F. Scott Fitzgerald's Influence - Film and TV adaptations; • BONUS - Most Famous Quotes from F. Scott Fitzgerald! Go on a journey back in time! Simply press the "Buy" button!


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Have you seen „The Great Gatsby”? Why don’t you enter F. Scott’s Fitzgerald's world again? You're in for a treat! Presenting “Tales of the Jazz Age” - collection of F. Scott Fitzgerald's short stories. This tremendous book comes with the following great features: • Complete original text of “Tales of the Jazz Age”; • Free audiobook access; • BONUS - F. Scott Fitzgerald's Infl Have you seen „The Great Gatsby”? Why don’t you enter F. Scott’s Fitzgerald's world again? You're in for a treat! Presenting “Tales of the Jazz Age” - collection of F. Scott Fitzgerald's short stories. This tremendous book comes with the following great features: • Complete original text of “Tales of the Jazz Age”; • Free audiobook access; • BONUS - F. Scott Fitzgerald's Influence - Film and TV adaptations; • BONUS - Most Famous Quotes from F. Scott Fitzgerald! Go on a journey back in time! Simply press the "Buy" button!

30 review for Tales of the Jazz Age (Annotated, with Audiobook Access) (Fiction Classics)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    Tales of the Jazz Age is a collection of 11 short stories published in 1922, although most had been published earlier in national magazines. Fitzgerald published 4 novels, that was his preferred way of writing. But he wrote short stories to make money, and being in constant financial trouble, it was the fastest way for him to make cash. This collection was good, it contains probably his most famous short story, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, as well as a few other very good ones. A couple Tales of the Jazz Age is a collection of 11 short stories published in 1922, although most had been published earlier in national magazines. Fitzgerald published 4 novels, that was his preferred way of writing. But he wrote short stories to make money, and being in constant financial trouble, it was the fastest way for him to make cash. This collection was good, it contains probably his most famous short story, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, as well as a few other very good ones. A couple I thought were nonsensical and not up to Fitzgerald's best. It's certainly worth the time and it is aptly named because if you ask almost anyone to name one writer associated with the Jazz Age or the Roaring 20's, 9 out of 10 will say F. Scott Fitzgerald. He defined that generation for writers, or more accurately, it defined him.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Despite reading so much about him and his wife Zelda, I cannot help but reveal my mad crush on Fitzgerald. This short story collection of 15 different stories offered a little bit of everything that I adore about the author. Men who crave women they can't have, WWI veterans readjusting to life after the battlefield, rich versus poor, big city thrills, rural intrigue, and a little bit of comedy and mystery to boot! Some of my fave sentences All life was weather, a waiting through the hot where e Despite reading so much about him and his wife Zelda, I cannot help but reveal my mad crush on Fitzgerald. This short story collection of 15 different stories offered a little bit of everything that I adore about the author. Men who crave women they can't have, WWI veterans readjusting to life after the battlefield, rich versus poor, big city thrills, rural intrigue, and a little bit of comedy and mystery to boot! Some of my fave sentences All life was weather, a waiting through the hot where events had no significance for the cool that was soft and caressing like a woman's hand on a tired forehead. It's an air of worry and poverty and sleepless nights Love is fragile- she was thinking- but perhaps the pieces are saved, the things that hovered on lips, that might have been said. The new love, the new tenderness learned, are treasured up for the next lover. Everybody's youth is a dream, a form of chemical madness. Goodreads review published 03/08/19

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    I've been intending to read Fitzgerald for some time and I'm very glad to have begun with this collection of stories. There is such a show of versatility and skill here. Not all stories are equally successful but all are interesting and some are truly wonderful, Among those I particularly enjoyed were "The Camel's Back", "May Day"", "O Russett Witch" and "The Lees of Happiness". Themes central to Fitzgerald's life and other works are scattered through these tales: the disparity of wealth and pov I've been intending to read Fitzgerald for some time and I'm very glad to have begun with this collection of stories. There is such a show of versatility and skill here. Not all stories are equally successful but all are interesting and some are truly wonderful, Among those I particularly enjoyed were "The Camel's Back", "May Day"", "O Russett Witch" and "The Lees of Happiness". Themes central to Fitzgerald's life and other works are scattered through these tales: the disparity of wealth and poverty, good and evil, bad things happening to good people, zany characters and activities, true love and love gone very bad. I highly recommend this story collection and am sure I will read these again. Thank you Tajma for leading me here.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    Considering I didn't like The Great Gatsby, I'm amazed at how I'm loving the other works of F. Scott Fitzgerald so far! I read This Side Of Paradise and was enthralled, and this book of short stories was equal parts enchanting and intelligent. I read it on my Kindle, and I ended up highlighting a lot of sentences and passages because they were so beautifully written. The book includes "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," which is nowhere near as complex a story as the movie version. I did enjo Considering I didn't like The Great Gatsby, I'm amazed at how I'm loving the other works of F. Scott Fitzgerald so far! I read This Side Of Paradise and was enthralled, and this book of short stories was equal parts enchanting and intelligent. I read it on my Kindle, and I ended up highlighting a lot of sentences and passages because they were so beautifully written. The book includes "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," which is nowhere near as complex a story as the movie version. I did enjoy it a lot, but had to separate it from the movie, as the two are so different. My favorite story was "The Diamond As Big As The Ritz." I was captivated from the very beginning. At first, it's like a fairy tale. I kept thinking, "Where's the catch? Is this all a dream?" Then when the catch happened, it was like an adventure movie. PLEASE, at least read this story! The only story I didn't enjoy was "Tarquin of Cheapside." I just plain didn't get it. It was a little bizarre. Maybe I'll go back and read it again, but that was the only story that I didn't enjoy at all. I definitely recommend this one! If you're tired of reading long novels and want a wonderful collection of short stories, go for this book!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Faye

    The Jelly Bean - 2/5 stars The Camel's Back - 2/5 stars May Day - 4/5 stars Porcelain and Pink - 2/5 stars The Diamond as Big as the Ritz - 4/5 stars The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - 5/5 stars FAVOURITE Tarquin of Cheapside - 3/5 stars O Russet Witch - 5/5 stars FAVOURITE The Lees of Happiness - 4/5 stars Mr Icky - 2/5 stars Jemina, the Mountain Girl - 3/5 stars The Jelly Bean - 2/5 stars The Camel's Back - 2/5 stars May Day - 4/5 stars Porcelain and Pink - 2/5 stars The Diamond as Big as the Ritz - 4/5 stars The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - 5/5 stars FAVOURITE Tarquin of Cheapside - 3/5 stars O Russet Witch - 5/5 stars FAVOURITE The Lees of Happiness - 4/5 stars Mr Icky - 2/5 stars Jemina, the Mountain Girl - 3/5 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonny Parshall

    This collection of short stories, short plays, and novelettes is so varied in style and execution forming an opinion of the whole is damn near impossible. So I shall break it down tale-by-tale. The Jelly Bean ☆☆ I felt this story caricatured American Southerners rather disgracefully. The Camel's Back ☆☆☆☆ Wild, clever humor from a talented humorist. May Day ☆☆☆☆ I love the characters featured in this story's vignettes. Their interactions truly captured the age from a broad spectrum of classes and bac This collection of short stories, short plays, and novelettes is so varied in style and execution forming an opinion of the whole is damn near impossible. So I shall break it down tale-by-tale. The Jelly Bean ☆☆ I felt this story caricatured American Southerners rather disgracefully. The Camel's Back ☆☆☆☆ Wild, clever humor from a talented humorist. May Day ☆☆☆☆ I love the characters featured in this story's vignettes. Their interactions truly captured the age from a broad spectrum of classes and backgrounds. It was funny at times, and rather depressing at other moments. Porcelain and Pink ☆☆☆ Very humorous, but nothing truly amazing about this one-act play. The Diamond as Big as the Ritz ☆☆☆☆☆ This is a brilliant act of terrestrial fantasy set in Montana. While adapted to several radio and teleplays during the 1940s and 1950s, it has yet to adapt to the silver screen. Instead of constant Gatsby remakes, perhaps Hollywood should give this "gem" another look. Exciting! The Curious Case of Benjamin Button ☆☆☆☆☆(+☆!!!) For fans of the movie, it might seem fairly foreign. Though names and several plot points remain, this story is by far a more humorous version of the tale of the man who is born elderly and ages in reverse, inspired by and in the vein of Mark Twain. It was sacrilege the film removed these elements and approached the story more dramatically. Tarquin of Cheapside ☆ I have no idea what was happening in this short, cryptic passage. Had LSD been in existence in the 1920s??? Oh Russet Witch! ☆☆☆ Another example of a Fitzgerald staple--the regrets of youth realized in old age/middle age. It could be quite evident the character Caroline/Alicia Dare was based on Fitzgerald's wife, Zelda. I haven't read into the subject, but many of his young female characters seem to adapt this young and carefree flapper/dancer/socialite archetype who often spoil the dreams of ambitious young men. The Lees of Happiness ☆☆☆ Don't let the title fool you, this too is a bit of a downer filled with regret and remorse. Mr Icky ☆☆ Another strange one-act play combining the folly of old age and Fitzgerald's bizarre sense of humor. Jemina, the Mountain Girl ☆ Strange, absurd, in the vein of Tarquin of Cheapside and Mr Icky. Overall ☆☆☆☆ While most of the stories were either too strange, so-so, or downright depressing, the few truly great stories (and majority of the volume's volume) made this book a worthwhile read. Fitzgerald could be hilarious, whimsical, and captivating when he wasn't trying to be too weird. It was a different era, altogether, and a strange one to boot. I guess you should've simply "been there." As a side note, Fitzgerald makes so many references to women's feet one can't but wonder if he harbored an infatuation. Again, something I haven't read into, but of which am suspicious.

  7. 5 out of 5

    leynes

    This edition of Tales of the Jazz Age features only four short stories from the original volume, the other four short stories are taken from Flappers and Philosophers, thus dating the publication from 1920 to 1922. Originally, I wanted to unhaul this book because A) I am not the biggest fan of short stories and B) quite frankly, I am not the biggest fan of Fitzgerald himself. There. I said it. It's not just the fact that I have massive problems with his "casual" racism and sexism (whatever casua This edition of Tales of the Jazz Age features only four short stories from the original volume, the other four short stories are taken from Flappers and Philosophers, thus dating the publication from 1920 to 1922. Originally, I wanted to unhaul this book because A) I am not the biggest fan of short stories and B) quite frankly, I am not the biggest fan of Fitzgerald himself. There. I said it. It's not just the fact that I have massive problems with his "casual" racism and sexism (whatever casual is supposed to mean in this context... ugh!), no, after reading two of his novels it felt like Scottie was focusing so much on first world problems and characters whining about being rich that I simply couldn't take it anymore. I was pleasantly surprised to discover that these short stories were all quite nuanced, historically insightful and brilliantly written. There are many allusions to Oscar Wilde (my bae) in Scottie's work, but never have I felt the connection stronger than in this collection. These short stories could've have been written by Oscar himself – the "l'art pour l'art"-vibe was strong in every single one of them, and we even saw some imitations of the dandy. Overall, I have to admit that I am very impressed with this collection and its exploration of gender roles and unhappy marriages (I didn't agree with a lot of what Scottie was trying to sell me, especially in regards to female beauty, and how it wanes with age, but I appreciated the insight nonetheless). I think that Tales of the Jazz Age is a fantastic collection to get familiar with Scottie and the common themes in his later works. My absolute favorite story in this collection is May Day btw, you should totally read it! That ending still has me shook!

  8. 5 out of 5

    DJ

    My favourite short story collection of Fitzgerald’s so far, I feel this is where he was really starting to experiment/branch out and come into his own. Contains 11 short stories, grouped into three parts. The stories were as follows: My Last Flappers: The Jelly-Bean - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Camel’s Back - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ May Day - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Porcelain and Pink - 3 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Fantasies: The Diamond as Big as the Ritz - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Ta My favourite short story collection of Fitzgerald’s so far, I feel this is where he was really starting to experiment/branch out and come into his own. Contains 11 short stories, grouped into three parts. The stories were as follows: My Last Flappers: The Jelly-Bean - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Camel’s Back - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ May Day - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Porcelain and Pink - 3 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Fantasies: The Diamond as Big as the Ritz - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Tarquin of Cheapside - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ O Russet Witch! - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Unclassified Masterpieces: The Lees of Happiness - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Mr Icky - 3 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Jemima, the Mountain Girl - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth (Alaska)

    Abandoned. The first 3 stories were very entertaining and I'm so sorry this collection didn't continue in the same vein. However, the next section was called "Fantasy". I guess I didn't understand what that meant. The first story was "A Diamond as Big as the Ritz". Some of my friends liked it. Not my thing in any way shape or form and whatever humor was supposed to be there fell flat flat flat. There were more stories to come and I just didn't want to face them. Abandoned. The first 3 stories were very entertaining and I'm so sorry this collection didn't continue in the same vein. However, the next section was called "Fantasy". I guess I didn't understand what that meant. The first story was "A Diamond as Big as the Ritz". Some of my friends liked it. Not my thing in any way shape or form and whatever humor was supposed to be there fell flat flat flat. There were more stories to come and I just didn't want to face them.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I can conclude, having finished this collection of short stories, that with the exception of The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald is just not really for me. This collection was saved, in my opinion, by The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, Porcelain and Pink, and Jemina the Mountain Girl. Barring some moments of subtle but shocking endings, I found the rest of the stories dull, and the characters empty, and the prose ineffective.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nell Beaudry

    This collection has eight stories: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Head and Shoulders, The Four Fists, The Cut-Glass Bowl, May Day, O Russet Witch, Bernice Bobs Her Hair, and The Lees of Happiness. A handful are incredible: Head and Shoulders, Bernice Bobs Her Hair, and The Lees of Happiness were far and away my favourites. Benjamin Button was great, The Four Fists was fun but forgettable, and The Cut-Glass Bowl was just alright. But May Day, and O Russet Witch, while being not only the lon This collection has eight stories: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Head and Shoulders, The Four Fists, The Cut-Glass Bowl, May Day, O Russet Witch, Bernice Bobs Her Hair, and The Lees of Happiness. A handful are incredible: Head and Shoulders, Bernice Bobs Her Hair, and The Lees of Happiness were far and away my favourites. Benjamin Button was great, The Four Fists was fun but forgettable, and The Cut-Glass Bowl was just alright. But May Day, and O Russet Witch, while being not only the longest, were also not terribly enjoyable reads. They were lyrical and well-written, with engaging prose, but some stories were significantly more poignant than others, while Bernice Bobs Her Hair was mostly hysterical.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gitte - Bookworm's Closet

    One of the best short story collections I've ever read! Many of the stories felt like 5-starred reads, but some were just s0-so (hence the 4 stars). A must read for any one who enjoys excellent writing and touching stories. Somehow these stories felt more powerful than some of his novels. I was reminded what a brilliant writer Fitzgerald was. One of the best short story collections I've ever read! Many of the stories felt like 5-starred reads, but some were just s0-so (hence the 4 stars). A must read for any one who enjoys excellent writing and touching stories. Somehow these stories felt more powerful than some of his novels. I was reminded what a brilliant writer Fitzgerald was.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Sciuto

    Many years ago, I was talking to a gentleman who, like myself, took great pleasure in reading amazing authors. I mentioned that, in my opinion, F. Scott Fitzgerald never fully reached the total potential he was capable of achieving. To me, despite the brilliance of "Gatsby," I always found something lacking in his works, a tragic flaw, a missing something that would have made so many more of his works comparable to Gatsby. Maybe, he should have practiced more self control, a little less partying Many years ago, I was talking to a gentleman who, like myself, took great pleasure in reading amazing authors. I mentioned that, in my opinion, F. Scott Fitzgerald never fully reached the total potential he was capable of achieving. To me, despite the brilliance of "Gatsby," I always found something lacking in his works, a tragic flaw, a missing something that would have made so many more of his works comparable to Gatsby. Maybe, he should have practiced more self control, a little less partying and a greater dedication to his work. The gentleman looked up at me and replied, "Most writers are lucky if they are able to write one great paragraph during their lifetimes. Fitzgerald wrote two great books, 'Gatsby and Tender is the Night.' Maybe more writers, should do a little more partying and not take themselves so serious." "The Jazz Age" was given to me as a gift quite a few years ago. I remember looking through it, but never reading the entire book. In a sense, I now wish I never picked it up again and read the entire book. It is a collection of autobiographical pieces that is poorly put together, like a disorganized diary, and it left me feeling empty and sorry for Mr Fitzgerald. It taught me nothing about "The Jazz Age" that I didn't already know and it sadly re-enforced my notion of Fitzgerald as a tragic figure. Yet, like always there was a touch of genius in the collection, that reminded me of "The Great Gatsby and Tender is the Night." In closing, this amazingly gifted artist writes, "It was not Monte Carlo I was looking at. It was back into the mind of the young man with cardboard soles who had walked the streets of New York. I was him again-for an instant I had the good fortune to share his dreams, I who had no more dreams of my own."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    The remarkable story "THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON" is even better then the movie which was made based on this story. This story was inspired by a remark of Mark Twain's to the effect that it was a pity that the best part of life came at the beginning and the worst part at the end. By trying the experiment upon only one man in a perfectly normal world I have scarcely given his idea a fair trial. Several weeks after completing it, I discovered an almost identical plot in Samuel Butler's "No The remarkable story "THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON" is even better then the movie which was made based on this story. This story was inspired by a remark of Mark Twain's to the effect that it was a pity that the best part of life came at the beginning and the worst part at the end. By trying the experiment upon only one man in a perfectly normal world I have scarcely given his idea a fair trial. Several weeks after completing it, I discovered an almost identical plot in Samuel Butler's "Note-books." The story was published in "Collier's" last summer and provoked this startling letter from an anonymous admirer in Cincinnati: "Sir— I have read the story Benjamin Button in Colliers and I wish to say that as a short story writer you would make a good lunatic I have seen many peices of cheese in my life but of all the peices of cheese I have ever seen you are the biggest peice. I hate to waste a piece of stationary on you but I will." Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

  15. 4 out of 5

    BrokenTune

    Over the last 10 minutes I must have switched between 3 and 4 stars about 20 times - but I did really like most of the short stories. Fitzgerald has a way of creating the not always endearing but nevertheless interesting characters in his short stories that are sadly missing in his novels (The Great Gatsby excepted).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    If you like Fitzgerald at all, or even the idea of him, you should read his short stories as they are really the backbone of his career. This particular electronic volume is available at no cost from Project Gutenberg. I imagine there are many other choices also. That being said, most of these works will not stun you. Some don't even make sense, many are decent and a few are fine. I did think many of them were mostly told on the surface, without a lot of introspection or development of the charac If you like Fitzgerald at all, or even the idea of him, you should read his short stories as they are really the backbone of his career. This particular electronic volume is available at no cost from Project Gutenberg. I imagine there are many other choices also. That being said, most of these works will not stun you. Some don't even make sense, many are decent and a few are fine. I did think many of them were mostly told on the surface, without a lot of introspection or development of the character. I don't think that is necessarily because of the short story format in and of itself, but it could be related to how they were published in magazines. And perhaps even a function of the Jazz Age itself. The stories were largely unhappy. Alcohol and ill-fated loves are common. I was surprised at a Diamond as Big as Ritz as it could not have been further from what the title suggests. I had not realized he wrote fantasies, of which three appear here, including The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. I had not seen the movie, judging it depressing and not caring for the lead actor. The story was just plain mean. O Russet Witch was interesting and I liked The Lees of Happiness, for which I imagined a much happier ending, but alas, despair is a much stronger tool in Fitzgerald's kit. Regardless, I think this a valuable read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Illiterate

    Two overlapping themes recur: (i) wasted privilege, youth, lives; (ii) all that glitters is symbolic & brittle.

  18. 4 out of 5

    H. Zipfel

    I'm still on the Fitzgerald kick, having purchased his complete works and finding a fair share of gems. TALES OF THE JAZZ AGE (1922) contains one story I adored - "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz," some surprisingly funny tales like "The Camel's Back," and "Pink and Porcelain," and some fumbling others, all of which I dissect below. “The Jelly Bean” 1920 ★★★☆☆ This mildly humorous and wistful little jaunt was cowritten by Zelda Fitzgerald, though in the opening, Francis merely notes that “his wife” I'm still on the Fitzgerald kick, having purchased his complete works and finding a fair share of gems. TALES OF THE JAZZ AGE (1922) contains one story I adored - "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz," some surprisingly funny tales like "The Camel's Back," and "Pink and Porcelain," and some fumbling others, all of which I dissect below. “The Jelly Bean” 1920 ★★★☆☆ This mildly humorous and wistful little jaunt was cowritten by Zelda Fitzgerald, though in the opening, Francis merely notes that “his wife” helped with some parts. Unfortunately, it’s clear which parts were written by Zelda. The protagonist’s name is Jelly, a more playful and whimsical name than one I’ve ever seen from Francis’s characters. Here’s a description-of the Jelly Bean himself, sounding very unFitzgeraldian: “He grew lazily during jelly bean season, which is every season, down in the land of the jelly-beans—” Another: “He was a jelly-bean… I write that again because it has a pleasant sound—rather like the beginning of a fairy story—” Again, clearly not Francis. The use of dashes and intuitive prose is so very Zelda. Anyway, back to poor Jelly Bean, also known as Jim in more rationally narrated parts (written by Francis)… Jim is just a good ol’ boy who falls in love with a crap shooting, whiskey drinking, high-falutin’ southern belle. There are memorable moments—such as the scene in which the girl in question scrapes gum off her shoe by dancing in a pool of gasoline. It doesn’t end well for the girl or for Jelly Bean. And, I don’t think short stories should be cowritten. “The Camel’s Back” 1920 ★★★☆☆ Young Perry, rebuffed by his fiance, embarks on a drunken adventure to a costume party, dressed a camel. The camel bows reverently in greeting others, seriously admits his need to drink enough to sustain him in the desert, and eventually clumsily dances the cotillion with his ex fiance. At the end of the party, the camel wins an award, but is anatomically incapable of accepting the box of cigars as his prize. This has the light humor of “Porcelain and Pink” (featured later in this volume). It’s a silly, and dare I say cute short story by Fitzgerald. Images of the camel dancing the cotillion will stay with me for a while. “May Day” 1920 ★★★☆☆ This story weaves separated “true” stories that happened around May Day, 1920 in New York City. In this tale we hear about the goings-on of radicalized anticommunist soldiers, idealistic, out-of-touch socialists, alcoholic bums and pompous socialites. It ends tragically, Fitzgerald attempting to weave their lives together through a series of gruesome, though not entirely memorable, deaths. “Porcelain and Pink” 1920 ★★★☆☆ Half narration, half play–this story is light, sweet, and silly. Two sisters, twins one can assume, argue over using the bath. A snobbish, intellectual boyfriend appears at the window, mistakes the identity of one for the other. The girl in the bathtub carries on, making light of the situation and making a fool of the boyfriend. “The Diamond as Big as the Ritz” 1922 ★★★★★ This starts as a fantasy regarding a man who lives on a mountain made of diamond, and it ends like a Bruce Springsteen song. If you’re not sure what I mean, read on. The beginning is a Gatsbyesque dream of gaudiness and glamour. Beneath the spectacle of the man’s diamond mansion lies seedy moral corruption. The richest man on earth remains that way through a series of murders and kidnappings. Children brought up in this fairytale of spoilt to the point of zero empathy and common sense. When well-to-do midwestern John shows up, things turn sour. By the end of the story, John is telling his beloved murderess fiance, heiress of the diamond mountain, to “turn up her coat collar” as they head out into the cold world, completely penniless. “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” 1922 ★★☆☆☆ Having already seen the movie inspired by this tale, my expectations were low going into this one. However the film, despite its shortcomings, exceeded the short story’s enjoyability. This story is merely a tale of aging in reverse, with tedious descriptions of gray hair, puberty, and the like. In the table of contents, Fitzgerald provided an anonymous letter written in response to “Benjamin Button.” This letter may be worth more merit than the story itself: “Sir– I have read the story Benjamin Button in Colliers and I wish to say that as short story writer, you would make a good lunatic. I have seen many pieces of cheese in my life but of all the pieces of cheese I have seen you are the biggest. I hate to waste a piece of stationary on you, but I will.” “Tarquin of Cheapside” 1917 ★★★★☆ Set in the Elizabethan era, this is a uniquely written narrative about a man running from two assailants on Cheapside Street in London. The fleeing man, “Soft Shoes,” escapes the wrath of “Flowing Boots” by moving with the clouds when they cast over the moon. Pikeman stand at the ready in the streets, hoping to catch an unknown “Satan.” In Part II, Wessel Caxter, an indolent man who spends all his time reading, shelters the fleeing man on the promise that Soft Shoes will write something entertaining for him to read. It is not until the end of this brief plot that we read the opening of the tale, which Soft Shoes titled “The Rape of Lucrece.” It can be assumed, then, that the man writing the poem (Soft Shoes) is Tarquin, the Roman soldier at the forefront of Shakespeare’s poem, and that Fitzgerald’s short story is meant to exist with the universe of that tale. So, we have a story within a story; Fitzgerald’s creativity is on full display here. It’s clear that Fitzgerald is flexing his Wordsmithian muscles here, concentrating on how deliciously he could deliver unusual words for usual things, such as “Soft Shoes,” “Flowing Boots,” and later when he describes the clouds over the moon as “the hand’s… pale caress.” Fitzgerald claims to have written this at only 19, and I fully take his word for it. This is more puzzle than story, more clever than significant. “O Russet Witch” 1921 ★☆☆☆☆ Merlin Grainger spends his life in a bookshop while pining after an unruly, carefree, boisterous flapper-type woman: Caroline. One day, Caroline strolls into the bookshop in which he works, and starts throwing books, tearing down the place. He loves it–her chaos a symbol of her unrestrained nature and her ambivalence to the world’s expectations. Caroline is elusive, so he marries Olive instead – a calm and loyal woman of his own status. They enjoy a quiet life together, but as he grows through various stages in his life, he continues to wish he had access to the riotous party girl who radiated mayhem and drama. Merlin dies at 65, feeling he wasted his life. This was written in 1921 and explains much about Fitzgerald’s view of aging, dating, and his philosophy on how one ought to live life. In one passage, he describes turning 35 as “a gradual withdrawal from life… ending up at last in a solitary, desolate point… we sit waiting for death.” It is no surprise, given this mindset, that Fitzgerald died in his 40s. He viewed life as meant to be lived by the young, and as chaos and fun preferable to routine and security. This short story also explains his marriage to Zelda. Zelda and Francis were known for the pandemonium they enjoyed together in the 1920s, but the drunken, frivolous, hilarious parties they enjoyed in their youth turned violent and sour as they aged. Need I remind the reader of Francis and Zelda’s untimely death? Looking back on this text at the publication of the volume, TALES OF THE JAZZ AGE, published in 1922, Fitzgerald admits that the short story is problematic. Yet, he chose to leave it as is, saying, “However the years may have dealt with Merlin Grainger, I myself was thinking always in the present.” I interpret this to mean that Fitzgerald was only thinking of his life when he wrote this short little tale, and his fascination with the tumult and drama of the upper class. However short-sighted the plot may be, Fitzgerald’s writing does not disappoint. Fitzgerald writes the fascination and radiance of romance in a fresh way in each of his stories. Take this example from “O Russet Witch”: “‘Are you going?’ He knew she was. His question was simply a lingering wile to detain her and extract for another moment that dazzling essence of light he drew from her presence, to continue his enormous satisfaction in her features, which were like kisses and, he thought, like the features of a girl he had known back in 1910.” “The Lees of Happiness” 1920 ★☆☆☆☆ This one did not contain a hint of Fitzgerald’s usual romping pomp and splendor. This is a quiet story about a woman named Roxanne. Roxanne gives up a promising dancing career to settle down with a man named Jeff. They are both very much young and in love, but after only a few years of marriage, Jeff is diagnosed with a terminal illness and becomes comatose. Roxanne continues to care for him until his death less than ten years later. Similar to a famous Christmas story I dislike, IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE, the wife does not remarry after her husband’s death, but remains devoted entirely to him. She becomes saintlike. Again, similar to the wife in that Christmas tale, she takes on the reputation of a spinster. Her only happiness is in memories of her husband. Funny that she never thinks back to her days as a dancer, or of her own family. I’d rather just forget this story altogether. “Mr. Icky” 1920 ★☆☆☆☆ This is a short one-act play written in a somewhat absurdist, flippant style. This seems like Fitzgerald’s attempt at dark humor. I would call it inspired by Samuel Beckett if Beckett had not contributed to the theater of the absurd 30 years after this was written. An old man, Mr. Icky, is mistreated and forgotten by his children, and then he dies. Depressing and strange – I didn’t get this one at all. “Jemina, the Mountain Girl” 1917 ★★☆☆☆ Jemina Tantrum, a “mountain girl,” is from a family of whiskey brewers. Upon finding gold on Tantrum land, a feud with the neighbors, the Doldrums, ignites. Meanwhile, a man from a nearby city arrives in attempt to buy the land. Jemina falls in love with him. The Doldrums launch a full-scale attack on the Tantrums, including brick-throwing and arson. Jemina and the man from the city die in one another’s arms. This extremely brief piece of humor was enjoyable for its clever names and touches of satire. Better than “Mr. Icky” but not as good as “Jelly-Bean.”

  19. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Apart from the famous short about ole' Benny there is nothing here to write home about. The acclaim for F. Scott Fitzgerald is overrated, the skill of the pen does not exist. Two books, two failures and no amount of telling me what I am misssing will convince me to read anymore of this third-rate writer. Awful, just awful. Two stars for the story of Ben. Yes my kind bookshop gave me a refund. File under c for Murakami... (That's c for crap). Apart from the famous short about ole' Benny there is nothing here to write home about. The acclaim for F. Scott Fitzgerald is overrated, the skill of the pen does not exist. Two books, two failures and no amount of telling me what I am misssing will convince me to read anymore of this third-rate writer. Awful, just awful. Two stars for the story of Ben. Yes my kind bookshop gave me a refund. File under c for Murakami... (That's c for crap).

  20. 4 out of 5

    tortoise dreams

    Fitzgerald's second collection of short stories, published shortly after his second novel The Beautiful and Damned. Book Review: Tales of the Jazz Age includes a few of the best stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940) and several that achieve nothing more than being briefly entertaining ("Porcelain and Pink") and beautifully written. By this time magazines would publish anything he wrote, so Fitzgerald was scraping the barrel (he needed the money) digging up old sketches from college, absurdis Fitzgerald's second collection of short stories, published shortly after his second novel The Beautiful and Damned. Book Review: Tales of the Jazz Age includes a few of the best stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940) and several that achieve nothing more than being briefly entertaining ("Porcelain and Pink") and beautifully written. By this time magazines would publish anything he wrote, so Fitzgerald was scraping the barrel (he needed the money) digging up old sketches from college, absurdist ramblings, imaginary plays, six-page enigmas, anything else he could find -- and all were published. His daughter, Frances "Scottie" Fitzgerald. observed that not all of them were worth keeping as "they are 'pieces' rather than stories proper." Some are more clever than brilliant ("Tarquin of Cheapside"), but the oddities are fun and demonstrate his range -- few would guess that all of these were written by our Chronicler of the Roaring Twenties a century ago. He was interested in experimenting, breaking the mold, and could be absurdly silly as some sort of proto-Beckett. But amidst the others are high points of Fitzgerald's short story career. "May Day" is a serious (he calls it "unpleasant") and nuanced take on social and political issues of the day. In "A Diamond as Big as the Ritz" (my favorite) Fitzgerald demonstrates that the rich really are quite different than the rest of us, willing to calmly countenance slavery, fratricide, and serial killing to preserve their wealth. "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," a fanciful tour de force, is both more sentimental and more effective than I expected. (It's also a distantly related 2008 film with Brad Pitt.) These three works belong in any selection of his stories. Fitzgerald's secret weapon is his unique empathy, an ability to get inside the minds and emotions of any of his characters, and take us along with him. [3½★]

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

    This is rather a mixed bunch of Fitzgerald's early short stories. I preferred the tragi-comic ones where he combines the crazy whirl of the Jazz Age with the poignant sense of lost youth and innocence - for example, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button or the brilliantly understated The Lees of Happiness . Some of the other sketches and stories are less satisfying, especially those where the satire seems quite heavy handed. Interesting as an introduction to the themes and ideas that Fitzgerald This is rather a mixed bunch of Fitzgerald's early short stories. I preferred the tragi-comic ones where he combines the crazy whirl of the Jazz Age with the poignant sense of lost youth and innocence - for example, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button or the brilliantly understated The Lees of Happiness . Some of the other sketches and stories are less satisfying, especially those where the satire seems quite heavy handed. Interesting as an introduction to the themes and ideas that Fitzgerald developed further in his novels, and I particularly liked the presentation of my Alma Classics edition, which has photographs, extensive notes and a delightful cover.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    I’ve read three of Fitzgerald’s novels, THIS SIDE OF PARADISE (1920), THE GREAT GATSBY (1925), and TENDER IS THE NIGHT (1933), but I had not read this collection of eleven stories (1922) and happened to read it only because a friend recommended one of the stories, “ The Diamond As Big As the Ritz” , telling me that it bore an eerie resemblance to Donald Trump’s obsession with wealth and power. It does that, and it’s strange to think that this story was written nearly 100 years ago. That’s what g I’ve read three of Fitzgerald’s novels, THIS SIDE OF PARADISE (1920), THE GREAT GATSBY (1925), and TENDER IS THE NIGHT (1933), but I had not read this collection of eleven stories (1922) and happened to read it only because a friend recommended one of the stories, “ The Diamond As Big As the Ritz” , telling me that it bore an eerie resemblance to Donald Trump’s obsession with wealth and power. It does that, and it’s strange to think that this story was written nearly 100 years ago. That’s what got me interested in the rest of the stories, where I think Fitzgerald is often at his best as a writer. Fitzgerald wrote nearly 200 short stories, most of them commercial magazine pieces and forgettable. But the author put together this collection, stories he obviously thought were good. They’re grouped in three categories, “My Last Flappers,” “Fantasies,” and a probably ironically titled, “Unclassified Masterpieces.” A powerful novella in the first section, “May Day,” combines the disillusionment of post World War I veterans with the extravagant trappings of a business community, celebrating the war’s victory. A grim collision of soldiers, college boys, drunkeness, and a mob leads to a suicide and exposes the dark reality behind the surface glitter of the 20’s. Variations on this theme of deceptive initial appearances appear in many of the other stories as well. “Jelly Bean,” also in the first section portrays a small town idler who flirts with a wealthy girl and begins to take the flirting seriously until she carelessly drops him. The second section “Fantasies”, aptly named, contains two of Fitzgerald’s most famous stories, “The Diamond As Big As the Ritz,” and “ The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” made into a 2008 movie. “Benjamin Button” could be viewed as a satire, one that shows an individual growing, not older but younger. The pursuit of youth as a dream of happiness is a common American aspiration, but in Benjamin’s case, there is no stopping the process and he finally reverts to a mindless infantile state. In “O Russet Witch” Fitzgerald reverses the process, following a young couple from their youth to their late 60’s. They do not age well, the young man settling into a conventional and unsatisfying marriage, while the young girl, once beautiful and charmingly impulsive at 19, has become a selfish old crone. I’d have to agree with Fitzgerald that “The Lees of Happiness” found in “Unclassified Masterpieces” is truly a masterpiece. It has wonderful visual and cinematic qualities and I’m surprised it hasn’t been adapted into a movie. It deals with a young couple who apparently have everything – wealth, intelligence, good looks – and it is all tragically lost through a debilitating disease that strikes suddenly How the wife deals with this abrupt change is at the heart of the story, but what gives the story complexity and depth is a subtle comparison with a second couple whose circumstances are e different, but come to face similar psychological difficulties. A wide range of experiences in these stories give the reader a real appreciation of Fitzgerald. He transports one back to the “roaring twenties”, the “jazz age” with all of its unique characteristics d and at the same time depicts individuals who are recognizable in any time period

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elisha

    Overall Rating: 4.5 stars. Breakdown of Individual Ratings: 5 stars: 'The Lees of Happiness', 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button', and 'Head and Shoulders' 4.5 stars: 'The Cut-Glass Bowl' 4 stars: 'May Day', 'O Russet Witch', and 'Bernice Bobs Her Hair' 3 stars: 'The Four Fists' This is a fabulous selection of stories. If I'm going to be a Fitzgerald purist (which, admittedly, I am), I take issue with the fact that the Penguin Hardback Classics edition I read, though gorgeous, does not contain t Overall Rating: 4.5 stars. Breakdown of Individual Ratings: 5 stars: 'The Lees of Happiness', 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button', and 'Head and Shoulders' 4.5 stars: 'The Cut-Glass Bowl' 4 stars: 'May Day', 'O Russet Witch', and 'Bernice Bobs Her Hair' 3 stars: 'The Four Fists' This is a fabulous selection of stories. If I'm going to be a Fitzgerald purist (which, admittedly, I am), I take issue with the fact that the Penguin Hardback Classics edition I read, though gorgeous, does not contain the full contents of the original short story collection entitled Tales of the Jazz Age which Fitzgerald published in 1922. Only four 'highlights' from that collection ('Benjamin Button', 'The Lees of Happiness', 'May Day', and 'O Russet Witch') feature in here; the other four were originally published in Flappers and Philosophers (1920). Whilst I would highly recommend this edition as an introduction to Fitzgerald's short story writing because the selection is absolutely stellar (although I will never understand HOW 'The Diamond as Big as the Ritz' was omitted), I think it should be clarified that this is not reflective of any publication that Fitzgerald himself ever made. If you wish to read the original Tales of the Jazz Age, complete with the author's charming notes on each individual story, I recommend the cheap-and-cheerful Collins Classics edition entitled The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Tales of the Jazz Age. It may not be as pretty as this edition, but it has 'The Diamond as Big as the Ritz' and 'Porcelain and Pink' in it, so that really doesn't matter. I shall now get down from off of my soap box and talk about what I DID like about this deceptive but wonderful collection of short stories. This is a fine selection of some of the greatest highlights of Fitzgerald's early career, and it makes for a wonderful introduction to this author. I question some of the inclusions - 'The Four Fists' is decidedly meh amongst the other stories, and I don't believe that 'O Russet Witch' should have been chosen ahead of other notable Tales of the Jazz Age - but thematically and in terms of length these choices are sound. There's magical realism and (light) fantasy, there's flappers and philosophers, there's young love and premature death, there's dreams and reality, there's parties and riots... These eight stories cover a wide range of topics and remain utterly identifiable even when read back-to-back. They're all so beautifully written and achingly romantic too. Fitzgerald disliked much of his short story writing, but I'm very much endeared by it. The selection of what is arguably the best of the best in this edition will surely lead many others to feel the same. Of the eight stories in here, I'd read exactly half before - the four from the original Tales of the Jazz Age. 'The Lees of Happiness' became one of my all-time favourite short stories when I read it for the first time and remains so having read it again. It's so beautiful and poetic and it's incredibly sad, yet it maintains a hopeful quality throughout which, in a way, makes it all the more painful. If I were to recommend any one Fitzgerald story for anyone to read, however, it would be 'The Curious Case of Benjamin Button'. That story is just an utter joy. So clever and thoughtful, yet also so funny and enjoyable. It was even better second time around than it was the first, and that is testament to just how utterly wonderful it is. My opinion on 'O Russet Witch' also improved second time around, although I still wouldn't call it a favourite. And 'May Day'... I really want to love 'May Day', and both times that I've read it I've been absolutely captivated by its beginning, but I just find it far longer than necessary. It loses it momentum about halfway, which is a shame because there's some real quality in there. All of these stories are very good stories though, and I got just as much - if not more - out of them the second time as I did the first. Of the stories that were new to me, 'Head and Shoulders' was BY FAR my favourite. It's just so clever? And the twist at the end is so unexpected? It made me laugh aloud but also made me want to squeal with joy. It's such an endearing, lovely story and I'm glad to have read it at last. 'The Cut-Glass Bowl' was also a highlight. Although I found it a little slow getting started, I loved the almost magical realism/fantasy elements of it which suggested that the bowl was cursed. Again, the ending completely got to me, making me gasp aloud a little bit and read it over again. 'Bernice Bobs Her Hair' - one of Fitzgerald's most famous stories - I thought was charming. I particularly liked the ending (again!) and I thought that it offered an interesting comment on the flapper image of the day and how it fitted with the expected role of women. In comparison with the rest of these, 'The Four Fists' was very disappointing. It's been a little while since I read it now and I'm struggling to recall much of what happened in it. I didn't dislike it - not by any means - but it was by far the weakest of the collection for me. Overall, though, I was impressed by these new-to-me stories, and I'll be sure to read the rest of Flappers and Philosophers one day to see how it compares. All things considered, reading this book was a wonderful experience. Despite my rather pretentious complainants at the beginning of this review, I do think that this edition is worthwhile because it showcases Fitzgerald at his story writing best. Admittedly, a lot of these stories are slow on the build-up and that sometimes detracts from their quality, but no one is claiming that this man is the greatest short story writer of all time. He's primarily known for his novels for a reason. However, I believe that his stories are definitely still worth reading, and seven of these eight definitely come recommended by me. Plus, the Penguin Hardback Classics edition of this book is absolutely stunning. When you look at it that way, is there really any reason not to read it?

  24. 5 out of 5

    JDK1962

    While I have loved Fitzgerald's novels (at least, back when I read them), I can't say I actually enjoyed this collection of stories. While Fitzgerald was obviously an engaging writer, the stories here feel like him coasting along. There are completely trivial pieces that he wrote as an undergraduate (and are of the quality you'd expect from an undergrad), pieces that he wrote for the money (literally, he admits in the forward that one was written so he could buy, IIRC, a watch), and experimental While I have loved Fitzgerald's novels (at least, back when I read them), I can't say I actually enjoyed this collection of stories. While Fitzgerald was obviously an engaging writer, the stories here feel like him coasting along. There are completely trivial pieces that he wrote as an undergraduate (and are of the quality you'd expect from an undergrad), pieces that he wrote for the money (literally, he admits in the forward that one was written so he could buy, IIRC, a watch), and experimental pieces that, in my opinion, don't work (Tarquin of Cheapside, for example). The collection feels like it was pulled together from whatever he had lying about, to cash in on the reputation that his novels had built. I don't think I'd classify anything here as even remotely essential Fitzgerald.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    It's been over a decade since I've read anything by F. Scott Fitzgerald and I had forgotten how much I enjoy him. Not every story in this collection is brilliant, in fact, the table of contents is fairly self-deprecating with a brief write-up by Fitzgerald about the story and where it was initially published. But when the stories are good, I don't want them to end. He can set a scene and dialogue beautifully and makes you feel like part of the story, only to hit you with something wonderfully ab It's been over a decade since I've read anything by F. Scott Fitzgerald and I had forgotten how much I enjoy him. Not every story in this collection is brilliant, in fact, the table of contents is fairly self-deprecating with a brief write-up by Fitzgerald about the story and where it was initially published. But when the stories are good, I don't want them to end. He can set a scene and dialogue beautifully and makes you feel like part of the story, only to hit you with something wonderfully absurd to stir up your enchantment. I don't know why I waited so long to revisit F. Scott Fitzgerald, but I won't wait another decade to do it again.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Hinman

    Jazz Age Stories is like a sampler platter of F. Scott Fitzgerald for the uninitiated. The Ice Palace, May Day, and The Offshore Pirate are all classic Fitzgerald stories and, along with the completely bizarre Mr. Icky play, the highlights of this collection. The others range from good but slight (Benediction, Dayrimple Goes Wrong) to the just plain awful - The Cut Glass Bowl being the most overblown, melodramatic Fitzgerald I've ever read, and Jemina, the Mountain Girl left me anything but mirt Jazz Age Stories is like a sampler platter of F. Scott Fitzgerald for the uninitiated. The Ice Palace, May Day, and The Offshore Pirate are all classic Fitzgerald stories and, along with the completely bizarre Mr. Icky play, the highlights of this collection. The others range from good but slight (Benediction, Dayrimple Goes Wrong) to the just plain awful - The Cut Glass Bowl being the most overblown, melodramatic Fitzgerald I've ever read, and Jemina, the Mountain Girl left me anything but mirthful. Still, it's nice to see Princeton F. Scott finding his voice and playing around with convention (I can picture him clapping his own back at the thought of how "edgy" stories like Tarquin of Cheapside and Dayrimple would be. - "Shakespeare as a rapist! That'll shake the academy!"). All the familiar motifs and characters are here: the scorned playboys, the hussy debs, the new money, and the old. Living out their lives as idle comedies or inescapable tragedies, and sometimes both, the protagonists of Fitzgerald's fiction seem to know all too well that they've only a moment to shine, grasping for anchor as the twenties whir past them in bright flashes of color, seductive glimpses of leg, and the frantic ecstasy of jazz.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Stahl

    Finding The Great Gatsby somewhat underwhelming, I didn't really have many expectations either way with this book, an earlier anthology of short stories written by Fitzgerald during his earlier life. Overall, they range from plain weird (Yemina, the Mountain Girl), through to okay but far from satisfying (Tarquin of Cheapside) to quite profoundly excellent (as with two of my favorites: Benjamin Button and The Lees of Happiness). Contrary to the sometimes depressing superficiality of his most fam Finding The Great Gatsby somewhat underwhelming, I didn't really have many expectations either way with this book, an earlier anthology of short stories written by Fitzgerald during his earlier life. Overall, they range from plain weird (Yemina, the Mountain Girl), through to okay but far from satisfying (Tarquin of Cheapside) to quite profoundly excellent (as with two of my favorites: Benjamin Button and The Lees of Happiness). Contrary to the sometimes depressing superficiality of his most famous novel, Fitzgerald displays here a vastly imaginative and erudite talent in storytelling. The two stories I mentioned liking before - along with The Diamond as Big as the Ritz and May Day, which I found strangely reminiscent of Ulysses - make this book a pleasure worth reading, with only the occasional weaker moment coming by but hardly outstaying its welcome anyway.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Downloads of "Tales of the Jazz Age" are FREE on iTunes, and so far I think this is a great collection. I really enjoyed this side of Fitzgerald, which is a little more light-hearted than his full-length novel output.:) The books is divided into two sections: his great jazz age work and his bizarre fantasy tales. While I didn't dislike his fantasy tales (Diamond As Big As Ritz, Benjamin Button)I found them too jarring set against his more timely Twenties stories, the dynamics being so different t Downloads of "Tales of the Jazz Age" are FREE on iTunes, and so far I think this is a great collection. I really enjoyed this side of Fitzgerald, which is a little more light-hearted than his full-length novel output.:) The books is divided into two sections: his great jazz age work and his bizarre fantasy tales. While I didn't dislike his fantasy tales (Diamond As Big As Ritz, Benjamin Button)I found them too jarring set against his more timely Twenties stories, the dynamics being so different they almost seemed at odds with each other. But all in all, this is a great introduction to the strange world of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Recommended listening: Chambermaid Swing, The Mojo Radio Gang & Charleston Butterfly by Parov Stelar.

  29. 4 out of 5

    E.C. McCarthy

    Fitzgerald observes the world from a sweet spot no other writer can find. He's close enough to maintain warmth, honesty, and intimacy with his characters, but just far enough away that he renders their imperfections, and the ugliness of the world they live in, without disdain. He's the long-ago friend who gently preserves the memory of everything good about the past without turning his cheek to the present. The final short story in the collection, The Lees of Happiness, is particularly poignant. Fitzgerald observes the world from a sweet spot no other writer can find. He's close enough to maintain warmth, honesty, and intimacy with his characters, but just far enough away that he renders their imperfections, and the ugliness of the world they live in, without disdain. He's the long-ago friend who gently preserves the memory of everything good about the past without turning his cheek to the present. The final short story in the collection, The Lees of Happiness, is particularly poignant. "She was in his room constantly, bearing medicine, straightening a pillow, talking to him almost as one talks to a nearly human dog, without hope of response or appreciation, but with the dim persuasion of habit, a prayer when faith has gone."

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I really enjoyed this collection and liked seeing Fitzgerald's range as a writer. "Love is fragile, but perhaps the pieces are saved, the things that hovered on lips, that might have been said. The new love words, the tendernesses learned, are treasured up for the next lover." "I smell sweet, I was made for love." "everybody's youth is a dream, a form of chemical madness" I really enjoyed this collection and liked seeing Fitzgerald's range as a writer. "Love is fragile, but perhaps the pieces are saved, the things that hovered on lips, that might have been said. The new love words, the tendernesses learned, are treasured up for the next lover." "I smell sweet, I was made for love." "everybody's youth is a dream, a form of chemical madness"

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