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Fifty years after President Lyndon B. Johnson called for a War on Poverty and enlisted Sargent Shriver to oversee it, the most important social issue of our day is once again the dire economic straits of millions of Americans. 1 in 3 Americans today live in poverty or teeter on the brink. 70 million are women and the children who depend on them. The fragile economic status Fifty years after President Lyndon B. Johnson called for a War on Poverty and enlisted Sargent Shriver to oversee it, the most important social issue of our day is once again the dire economic straits of millions of Americans. 1 in 3 Americans today live in poverty or teeter on the brink. 70 million are women and the children who depend on them. The fragile economic status of millions of American women is the shameful secret of the modern era—yet these women are also our greatest hope for change, and our nation’s greatest undervalued asset.The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back from the Brink asks—and answers—big questions. Why are millions of women financially vulnerable when others have made such great progress? Why are millions of women struggling to make ends meet even though they are hard at work? What is it about our nation—government, business, family, and even women themselves—that drives women to the financial brink? And what is at stake?To answer these questions, we examined in detail three major cultural and ecoomic changes over the past 50 years: Women work more outside the home, but still earn less than men. Women lead more families on their own. Women today need higher education to enter the middle class. To forge a path forward that recognizes this reality, The Shriver Report brought together a power packed roster of big thinkers and talented contributors, including Hillary Clinton, Anne-Marie Slaughter and Lebron James, and challenged them to collaborate with us to develop fresh thinking around practical solutions. This report’s unique combination of academic research, personal reflections, authentic photojournalism, groundbreaking poll results, front line workers, and box office celebrities, is all focused on a single issue of national importance: women and the economy. In The Shriver Report, Davos meets Main Street. ABOUT THE AUTHORS Maria Shriver is a mother of four, a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning journalist and producer, a six-time New York Times best-selling author, and an NBC News Special Anchor covering the shifting roles, emerging power and evolving needs of women in modern life. Since 2009, Shriver has produced a groundbreaking series of Shriver reports that chronicle and explore seismic shifts in the American culture and society affecting women today. Shriver was California’s first lady from 2003 to 2010 and, during that time, she spearheaded what became the nation’s premier forum for women, The Women’s Conference.The Center for American Progress is an independent nonpartisan educational institute dedicated to improving the lives of Americans through progressive ideas and action. CAP develops new, progressive policy ideas, challenges the media to cover the issues that truly matter, and shapes the national debate. Founded in 2003 by John Podesta to provide long-term leadership and support to the progressive movement, CAP is headed by Neera Tanden and based in Washington, DC. ABOUT THE SHRIVER REPORT The Shriver Report is a multi-platform project of A Woman's Nation, the nonprofit organization led by Maria Shriver that raises awareness, ignites conversation, and inspires impact around the defining issues and fundamental changes facing modern women.


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Fifty years after President Lyndon B. Johnson called for a War on Poverty and enlisted Sargent Shriver to oversee it, the most important social issue of our day is once again the dire economic straits of millions of Americans. 1 in 3 Americans today live in poverty or teeter on the brink. 70 million are women and the children who depend on them. The fragile economic status Fifty years after President Lyndon B. Johnson called for a War on Poverty and enlisted Sargent Shriver to oversee it, the most important social issue of our day is once again the dire economic straits of millions of Americans. 1 in 3 Americans today live in poverty or teeter on the brink. 70 million are women and the children who depend on them. The fragile economic status of millions of American women is the shameful secret of the modern era—yet these women are also our greatest hope for change, and our nation’s greatest undervalued asset.The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back from the Brink asks—and answers—big questions. Why are millions of women financially vulnerable when others have made such great progress? Why are millions of women struggling to make ends meet even though they are hard at work? What is it about our nation—government, business, family, and even women themselves—that drives women to the financial brink? And what is at stake?To answer these questions, we examined in detail three major cultural and ecoomic changes over the past 50 years: Women work more outside the home, but still earn less than men. Women lead more families on their own. Women today need higher education to enter the middle class. To forge a path forward that recognizes this reality, The Shriver Report brought together a power packed roster of big thinkers and talented contributors, including Hillary Clinton, Anne-Marie Slaughter and Lebron James, and challenged them to collaborate with us to develop fresh thinking around practical solutions. This report’s unique combination of academic research, personal reflections, authentic photojournalism, groundbreaking poll results, front line workers, and box office celebrities, is all focused on a single issue of national importance: women and the economy. In The Shriver Report, Davos meets Main Street. ABOUT THE AUTHORS Maria Shriver is a mother of four, a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning journalist and producer, a six-time New York Times best-selling author, and an NBC News Special Anchor covering the shifting roles, emerging power and evolving needs of women in modern life. Since 2009, Shriver has produced a groundbreaking series of Shriver reports that chronicle and explore seismic shifts in the American culture and society affecting women today. Shriver was California’s first lady from 2003 to 2010 and, during that time, she spearheaded what became the nation’s premier forum for women, The Women’s Conference.The Center for American Progress is an independent nonpartisan educational institute dedicated to improving the lives of Americans through progressive ideas and action. CAP develops new, progressive policy ideas, challenges the media to cover the issues that truly matter, and shapes the national debate. Founded in 2003 by John Podesta to provide long-term leadership and support to the progressive movement, CAP is headed by Neera Tanden and based in Washington, DC. ABOUT THE SHRIVER REPORT The Shriver Report is a multi-platform project of A Woman's Nation, the nonprofit organization led by Maria Shriver that raises awareness, ignites conversation, and inspires impact around the defining issues and fundamental changes facing modern women.

30 review for The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back from the Brink

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    I received a copy of this book for free from the Library Thing Early Reviewers program. While I've spent years regularly visiting many feminist websites, I found this book refreshing in the way that it presented clear solutions to the problems it identified. A lot of the time so much energy gets devoted to raging about problems that it seems like no movement forward is ever made. At the same time, it's a bit rage inducing that so many of these solutions proposed would cost so little, and yet it' I received a copy of this book for free from the Library Thing Early Reviewers program. While I've spent years regularly visiting many feminist websites, I found this book refreshing in the way that it presented clear solutions to the problems it identified. A lot of the time so much energy gets devoted to raging about problems that it seems like no movement forward is ever made. At the same time, it's a bit rage inducing that so many of these solutions proposed would cost so little, and yet it's obvious that they'll never be implemented in this current political and economic climate. The Report is really diplomatic in this sense - while it does note that there's extreme partisanship and a damaging affinity for capitalism above all else in this country, it hardly spends any time at all discussing how these two factors are hurting women. The Report provides data (about women, the work women do, and the families women have), identifies what our country needs to improve the lives of women and their families, and then presents specific fixes. The authors don't shame our policy makers or our employers, they don't point fingers or assign blame, they just say, "Here's where we stand, and here's our way out." The Report does a great job discussing how women of color specifically are faring, something that often gets lost when discussing women as a whole. It also does a great job of demonstrating how women and their families who live in poverty, or one crisis away from poverty, aren't there because of laziness or wanting a "hand out." In the same vein as I noted above, they don't even explicitly make this point too much - they just let the numbers do the talking. One would be hard pressed to read this book and think, "These people are really failing themselves," rather than, "Wow, we are really failing these people." I was reminded of the book Half the Sky, which had a global look at women's issues - both Half the Sky and this Report found that the key to a country's economic prosperity is investing in women. The more education and financial security a nation's women have, the more a country thrives. It's a message that America is ignoring right now at its own peril as it emphasizes profits at all costs, even when those costs are people.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bri

    While the information and statistics are very useful and actually up-to-date, the fact that many of the pieces are written by those who hold privilege and power was disappointing. While it mentions the hard-working, persevering, and dedicated women who are striving to make the best of everything, the brief synopsis of them comes off disingenuous. Perhaps I expected more heart to be put into the book, or rather my own bias is just getting in the way, either way, this overview of women in the US c While the information and statistics are very useful and actually up-to-date, the fact that many of the pieces are written by those who hold privilege and power was disappointing. While it mentions the hard-working, persevering, and dedicated women who are striving to make the best of everything, the brief synopsis of them comes off disingenuous. Perhaps I expected more heart to be put into the book, or rather my own bias is just getting in the way, either way, this overview of women in the US comes from the viewpoint of those who aren't struggling or who have never struggled. I think an inclusion of more of these womens' stories told by them in their own words and perhaps even a list of available resources to women by state could have made this book leaps and bounds better. I do value it's significance and the work it took to bring such a book together though.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Perhaps not meant to be read cover to cover, as many essays repeat the same stats (driving home the point, admittedly, but maybe for this reader too repetitive). It was fun to hear from "celebrities" and Shriver clearly leveraged her connections very well to ensure diverse and compelling voices (come for the Beyonce, stay for the Erenreich). An important piece of work regardless that's accessible, shareable, and critical. Did a good job discussing the unique challenges of diverse women, and also Perhaps not meant to be read cover to cover, as many essays repeat the same stats (driving home the point, admittedly, but maybe for this reader too repetitive). It was fun to hear from "celebrities" and Shriver clearly leveraged her connections very well to ensure diverse and compelling voices (come for the Beyonce, stay for the Erenreich). An important piece of work regardless that's accessible, shareable, and critical. Did a good job discussing the unique challenges of diverse women, and also balancing academics with those who have more skill at writing for a mainstream audience.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Saskia (Smitie)

    I received this book as part of the early reviewers on Library Thing. As a 'non-American' I learned quite a lot from this report, especially concerning social security policies (and the lack thereof). The articles were clear and easy to understand, but since a large part of the book consists of short essays, some facts and words repeated themselves too much. Therefore I recommend reading a few essays at a time. Nevertheless, the report gives a good insight in a sad truth. While we see ourselves I received this book as part of the early reviewers on Library Thing. As a 'non-American' I learned quite a lot from this report, especially concerning social security policies (and the lack thereof). The articles were clear and easy to understand, but since a large part of the book consists of short essays, some facts and words repeated themselves too much. Therefore I recommend reading a few essays at a time. Nevertheless, the report gives a good insight in a sad truth. While we see ourselves as the rich west, poverty is a serious problem. I was especially shocked about the lack of social security in the US, policies I normally take for granted. For example, paid sick leave, a sufficient minimum wage or pregnancy leave are not standard in the US, which can be vital safety nets in the downwards spiral of poverty. The report gives good ideas how the government, businesses and women themselves can act to break this trend. I would have liked to see a bit more about how these policies can be changed in a economic way. Just throwing money at it, hoping it will gain more secondary benefits by increase in spending by the women it helps, does not work. In the end, I give this report 4 stars. It is an interesting book which makes you think. The report does not throw difficult words at you and tries to show its message via a broad perspective of writers. From Hillary Clinton to experts to a single mom living in poverty, each of them get a chance to contribute. However due to the essays repeating themselves, the book does lose its message a bit. And some of the graphs are a bit confusing because they do not have axis titles. I will implement the first step to power a woman's nation and share this book via bookcrossing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    A must read! It's even free for your Kindle at amazon! Amazing report - very accessible and with public, private, and individual recommendations. Filled with eye-opening and frightening stats, personal stories, essays by experts from many fields, and action plans to "push back from the brink." Please at least read the Executive Summary if not the entire report. www.shriverreport.org A must read! It's even free for your Kindle at amazon! Amazing report - very accessible and with public, private, and individual recommendations. Filled with eye-opening and frightening stats, personal stories, essays by experts from many fields, and action plans to "push back from the brink." Please at least read the Executive Summary if not the entire report. www.shriverreport.org

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Copeland

    This is an important issue for our present and future But, i can't say that i enjoyed this book as much as I'd hoped. Repetition may be good to get ideas to stick, but I would have liked to have seen some more varied and nuanced i felt that I just kept seeing the same nu,beta and the same analysis. This is an important issue for our present and future But, i can't say that i enjoyed this book as much as I'd hoped. Repetition may be good to get ideas to stick, but I would have liked to have seen some more varied and nuanced i felt that I just kept seeing the same nu,beta and the same analysis.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I did not read this all the way through. I felt there were very strong and valid points in this report but after a while it became very repetitive and became more of a chore to read. I also found it disappointing that the women writing about struggling women were women of privilege. I wanted to hear from the women that live the life on the brink of poverty and let them have a voice.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    Interesting analysis of data to support the thesis that policy in the US is still modeled after families with one breadwinner and one stay-at-home parent. Great essays by LeBron James, Jennifer Garner, Jada Pinkett Smith and Hillary Rodham Clinton, and others.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Vijeta

    Great insight about women living on the brink. Goes into why so many of the people in poverty are women, how they get there, and ways they can get help. Also goes into ways in which we need to change our thinking of poverty and assistance programs that benefit women on the brink.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    A repetitive compilation of interesting information regarding women and the workforce. Takes too long to read cover to cover. I recommend you read another book and during a chapter break read an essay or two from this report.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This is a great read that really talks about the reality of women living on the brink of economic disaster. Anyone who thinks these women live this way by choice need to read this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Sobering. Kind of a slog to read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hayley Brown

    4.5.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bernadette Dvorscak

  17. 5 out of 5

    Toni Siedel-Dutton

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Carey

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen C

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nidia Erceg

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elvinet S Wilson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Goldsby

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paula

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mikele Luckfelt-meether

  27. 5 out of 5

    Renee Bouchard

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gail Haller

  29. 5 out of 5

    Faye Lewis

  30. 5 out of 5

    Diana

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