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Full Circles, Overlapping Lives: A New Vision of Identity and Connection in Our

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We live with strangers, not only in the streets and in the workplace, but in our very own homes. There are great differences between us -- even when we belong to the same family, race, class, or sex. In Full Circles, Overlapping Lives, Mary Catherine Bateson challenges us to rethink our lives at every stage of the life cycle, to question expected roles and relationships an We live with strangers, not only in the streets and in the workplace, but in our very own homes. There are great differences between us -- even when we belong to the same family, race, class, or sex. In Full Circles, Overlapping Lives, Mary Catherine Bateson challenges us to rethink our lives at every stage of the life cycle, to question expected roles and relationships and to discover new possibilities.Bateson eloquently weaves together the words of a diverse group of remarkable women whom she taught at Spelman College. Their stories tell of individual discovery and creative improvisation, and show how even the home can be a training ground for dealing with differences and learning to communicate across generations. She juxtaposes their lives with life histories from around the world -- from !Kung tribeswomen to share-croppers and recent immigrants -- to show the commonality between experiences which may, at first, seem very different, and to demonstrate how evolving definitions of identity, commitment, and fulfillment can allow for new and greater understanding.


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We live with strangers, not only in the streets and in the workplace, but in our very own homes. There are great differences between us -- even when we belong to the same family, race, class, or sex. In Full Circles, Overlapping Lives, Mary Catherine Bateson challenges us to rethink our lives at every stage of the life cycle, to question expected roles and relationships an We live with strangers, not only in the streets and in the workplace, but in our very own homes. There are great differences between us -- even when we belong to the same family, race, class, or sex. In Full Circles, Overlapping Lives, Mary Catherine Bateson challenges us to rethink our lives at every stage of the life cycle, to question expected roles and relationships and to discover new possibilities.Bateson eloquently weaves together the words of a diverse group of remarkable women whom she taught at Spelman College. Their stories tell of individual discovery and creative improvisation, and show how even the home can be a training ground for dealing with differences and learning to communicate across generations. She juxtaposes their lives with life histories from around the world -- from !Kung tribeswomen to share-croppers and recent immigrants -- to show the commonality between experiences which may, at first, seem very different, and to demonstrate how evolving definitions of identity, commitment, and fulfillment can allow for new and greater understanding.

30 review for Full Circles, Overlapping Lives: A New Vision of Identity and Connection in Our

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    p 135-136Yet changes in beliefs and assumptions are nothing new. In spite of all the imagery of rocks and foundations, of unchanging and unquestioning faith, there have always been some commitments that involved constant change and learning. In fact, all the best relationships have a degree of mystery, demanding growth and change, learning moving between strangers. The best friendships, the most resilient marriages, student and teacher, mentor and mentee. They float. The most striking example is p 135-136Yet changes in beliefs and assumptions are nothing new. In spite of all the imagery of rocks and foundations, of unchanging and unquestioning faith, there have always been some commitments that involved constant change and learning. In fact, all the best relationships have a degree of mystery, demanding growth and change, learning moving between strangers. The best friendships, the most resilient marriages, student and teacher, mentor and mentee. They float. The most striking example is the commitment of parents to a child—different from day to day and year to year, bridging shifting values and worlds of experience. We love our children, we criticize and discipline them, we keep trying to maintain mutual understanding, and we are less and less able to predict who they will become or to make decisions for them. One of the characteristics of parent-child relationships is how much we can learn from our children, if we will. We keep on growing because we live with strangers.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence Linnen

    In Full Circles, Overlapping Lives, best-selling author and cultural anthropologist Mary Catherine Bateson looks with an inspired eye at how our very concepts of personal identity and shared fulfillment are changing. Living longer than ever before, alongside increasingly diverse neighbors, we are obliged to rethink our lives at every stage of the life cycle, to question expected roles and relationships, and to discover new possibilities. This is a book rich with the telling observations and subt In Full Circles, Overlapping Lives, best-selling author and cultural anthropologist Mary Catherine Bateson looks with an inspired eye at how our very concepts of personal identity and shared fulfillment are changing. Living longer than ever before, alongside increasingly diverse neighbors, we are obliged to rethink our lives at every stage of the life cycle, to question expected roles and relationships, and to discover new possibilities. This is a book rich with the telling observations and subtle wisdom that Bateson has made her trademarks.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paulatics

    This is a must-read for introspective women. It made a profound impact on me when I read it. Author is Margaret Mead's daughter. This is a must-read for introspective women. It made a profound impact on me when I read it. Author is Margaret Mead's daughter.

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  30. 4 out of 5

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