web site hit counter Healing Fiction - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Healing Fiction

Availability: Ready to download

This book is Hillman's main analysis of analysis. He asks the basic question, What does the soul want? With insight and humor he answers, It wants fictions that heal. This book is Hillman's main analysis of analysis. He asks the basic question, What does the soul want? With insight and humor he answers, It wants fictions that heal.


Compare

This book is Hillman's main analysis of analysis. He asks the basic question, What does the soul want? With insight and humor he answers, It wants fictions that heal. This book is Hillman's main analysis of analysis. He asks the basic question, What does the soul want? With insight and humor he answers, It wants fictions that heal.

30 review for Healing Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    culley

    Select reading notes: - were the story written in another way, by another hand, from another perspective, it would sound different and therefore be a different story. I am suggesting the poetic basis of therapy, of biography, of our very lives. - rhetoric means the art of persuasion. The rhetoric of an archetype is the way each God persuades us to believe in the myth and the plot. Gods are not set apart, to be revealed in revelation, or through epiphanies of image. They are the rhetoric itself. To Select reading notes: - were the story written in another way, by another hand, from another perspective, it would sound different and therefore be a different story. I am suggesting the poetic basis of therapy, of biography, of our very lives. - rhetoric means the art of persuasion. The rhetoric of an archetype is the way each God persuades us to believe in the myth and the plot. Gods are not set apart, to be revealed in revelation, or through epiphanies of image. They are the rhetoric itself. To find the gods we need only to look at the genre of our story. - psychotherapy encourages the musing, that activity which frees memories into images. As we muse over a memory, it becomes an image, shedding its literal historical facticity, slipping its causal chains, and opening into the stuff of which art is made. The art if healing is healing into art. - No all psychological complexes appearing as dream figures and symptoms are up to date, asking for a today kind of therapy. Parts of us live in old-fashioned stories, they might shrink from Rolfing and EMDR, they might even fall into a faint, have an attack of the vapors or find themselves forced “to weekend." - one needs to read each literal sentence of one’s life metaphorically, see each picture of the past as an image. - the little people come from the land of the dead. The images who walk in on our dreams are our ancestors. Image as ancestor. The images are claiming us. This is the moral moment in imagination. Realizing the claim of the image. The images place a great responsibility on us. - There are things in the psyche that are no more “mine” than animals in the forest or birds in the air. - there are Gods and diamons and heroes in our perceptions, feelings, ideas and actions and these fantasy persons determine how we see, feel, think and behave, all existence structured by imagination. archetypal psychology - images are the voices of the underworld, those of below, and the underworld is the preeminent place of the soul. Daimons inhabit the lower regions, shadow is the psychological term, and we are brought low, humiliated, shamed when these figures speak their wants. Not because they are dirty doings, because we have disavowed the gods. - our way is not to interpret the image but to talk with it. Ask not what it means, but what it wants. What does the soul want? This method of inquiry is like writing a fiction. This dialog demands that one take part in writing one’s own story. Self-authorship - each of us has a place of lease resistance, an organic Achilles’ heal that determines the main lines of our psychic life. - the realization of somatic inferiority by the individual becomes a permanent impelling force for the development of his psyche - Adler - the inferior organ speaks an “organ jargon” that tells us about ourselves once we learn its language. (focusing) The afflicted organ gains one’s constant attention, furnishing inexhaustible material. Because we concentrate on them, these inferior spots are places of great potential. - Psyche is the name for the life-potential of an inferior creature. To feel a sense of soul at all is to feel inferior. The old search for the bodily localization of soul is now given new meaning— finding the place of lease resistance. - soul speaks with the voice of the inferiors, those kept down, below, and behind, as the child, the woman, the ancestor and the dead, the animal, the weak and the hurt, the revolting and the ugly, the shadows judged and imprisoned. - therapies that safeguard themselves from the necessity feelings of inferiority (recognition of shadow) run the risk of not becoming therapies of the soul.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bill Bridges

    A foundational book for Archetypal Psychology. In exploring the question "What does the soul want?", Hillman demonstrates that it wants fictions as therapy. Fantasies heal. Especially interesting is Hillman's examination of the psychologies of Freud, Jung, and Adler -- their fictions. Even the "case history", that bastion of objective account, is a genre of writing, complete with its own tropes. It is a form of detective story, which we literalize as completely factual. Using Adler's thought, Hil A foundational book for Archetypal Psychology. In exploring the question "What does the soul want?", Hillman demonstrates that it wants fictions as therapy. Fantasies heal. Especially interesting is Hillman's examination of the psychologies of Freud, Jung, and Adler -- their fictions. Even the "case history", that bastion of objective account, is a genre of writing, complete with its own tropes. It is a form of detective story, which we literalize as completely factual. Using Adler's thought, Hillman gets to the heart of our need to literalize what is best kept metaphorical, "as if." The tension of "as if" is too much for us (the ego) to bear and it needs either/or logic to relieve this tension. It must dogmatize to escape anxiety. This brings to mind Robert Anton Wilson's Maybe Logic (if we added "maybe" to every statement, we might not be so dogmatic), and the quantum condition of Shroedinger's Cat: existing in the indeterminate state of being both alive and dead (both/and logic) before our observation forces it into one state or the other. These speculations on physics are mine, not Hillman's, but it's where my thought went upon reading this excellent book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    kit

    i tried reading this about 20 years ago, when i desperately wanted answers and prescriptions. coming back, after all this time, i find myself luxuriating in the textures of this text. simply taking pleasure in the thread-work and composition; the beats and images; the call, the response, and the spaces between. this is one of those rare books that does what it references. i can tell that i'll be returning again, and soon. i tried reading this about 20 years ago, when i desperately wanted answers and prescriptions. coming back, after all this time, i find myself luxuriating in the textures of this text. simply taking pleasure in the thread-work and composition; the beats and images; the call, the response, and the spaces between. this is one of those rare books that does what it references. i can tell that i'll be returning again, and soon.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anita Ashland

    A fascinating look at case histories as a genre of writing. Fiction and story is central to who we are. "Perhaps our age has gone to analysis not to be loved or get cured, or even to Know Thyself. Perhaps we go to be given a case history, to be told into a soul story and given a plot to live by." A fascinating look at case histories as a genre of writing. Fiction and story is central to who we are. "Perhaps our age has gone to analysis not to be loved or get cured, or even to Know Thyself. Perhaps we go to be given a case history, to be told into a soul story and given a plot to live by."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This was one of the most important books I've ever read. Until then, I had thought the idea of narrative = life was a metaphor. Reading Hillman, and this book in particular, taught me that story is central to who we are. It really underscored Erving Goffman's The Presentation of Everyday Life in a new and fascinating way. This was one of the most important books I've ever read. Until then, I had thought the idea of narrative = life was a metaphor. Reading Hillman, and this book in particular, taught me that story is central to who we are. It really underscored Erving Goffman's The Presentation of Everyday Life in a new and fascinating way.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Allen

    If you know Hillman, are a writer, a healer, study depth psychology or just plain philosophize the infinite greatness within, this is a must-read. Dense yet digestible. Poignant while humorous. Ineffably true. A book I know I’ll refer back to over my lifetime.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo Taylor

    Redactado por un expositor impecable de la poética Jungiana, Hillman extiende con facilidad su impresionante bagaje de conocimientos y experiencias a través de una narrativa que obliga al lector detenerse después de cada oración, anotar, investigar y continuar. El valor de un libro como este excede por completo a la solución de su pregunta central. Pues para responder ¿Qué es lo que quiere el alma? es obligatorio, como en los cursos de filosofía, desarticular por completo cada suposición, prejui Redactado por un expositor impecable de la poética Jungiana, Hillman extiende con facilidad su impresionante bagaje de conocimientos y experiencias a través de una narrativa que obliga al lector detenerse después de cada oración, anotar, investigar y continuar. El valor de un libro como este excede por completo a la solución de su pregunta central. Pues para responder ¿Qué es lo que quiere el alma? es obligatorio, como en los cursos de filosofía, desarticular por completo cada suposición, prejuicio, etimología, intención y referencia lingüística que requiere una pregunta tan profunda y ambigua. Es una relato, una ficción más, para hacer una pausa obligatoria y preguntar hasta el cansancio miles de preguntas nuevas a experiencias conocidas, recurrentes y críticas para el contacto con el alma. Increíble, revelador, honesto, abierto y comprometido al análisis profundo.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Boyce

    If your work, or play, involves any degree of depth psychology (and you CBTers would probably enjoy this too) I highly recommend this book. We humans are meaning-making beings. We make meaning out of practically everything around us. Peruvian Shamans would call this a Jaquar level of perception. Hillman endorses the idea that our lives are significantly influenced by the 'stories' we tell ourselves about our lives. Like the Transactional Analysis notion of 'scripts', Hillman says that any dysfun If your work, or play, involves any degree of depth psychology (and you CBTers would probably enjoy this too) I highly recommend this book. We humans are meaning-making beings. We make meaning out of practically everything around us. Peruvian Shamans would call this a Jaquar level of perception. Hillman endorses the idea that our lives are significantly influenced by the 'stories' we tell ourselves about our lives. Like the Transactional Analysis notion of 'scripts', Hillman says that any dysfunction in our life is directly proportional to the fixation of the 'story' into reality. As a therapist I see this all the time with clients. Any particular intervention must fit into the client's story to be acceptable and yet confront the story to free them from its grip. To give you a taste of the book, here's a quote from page 42, talking about case histories. "Finally, we recognize that the case history in psychology is a genuine psychic event, an authentic expression of the soul, a fiction created not by the doctor but by the historicizing activity of the psyche, and that this genre of telling corresponds with the reemergence of soul in our age through depth analysis. As depth psychology invented a new kind of practitioner and patient, a new language, a new style of ritual, and of loving, so it shaped a new genre of story, one that is neither biographical nor medical, nor confessional witness, but a narrative of the inner workings of the soul through time, a history of memories, dreams, reflections, sometimes disguised, but not necessarily, in empirical realities. No matter who writes them, they remain documents of the soul. It is in this sense that case histories are fundamental to depth psychol­ogy. Not as empirical fundamentals or residues of the medical model, nor as paradigmatic examples demonstrating one or another theorist's plot do they earn our attention. They are subjective phenomena, soul stories. Their chief importance is for the character about whom they are written, you and me. They give us a narrative, a literary fiction that deliteralizes our life from its projective obsession with outwardness by putting it into a story. They move us from the fiction of reality to the reality of fiction."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    Fascinating read! Hillman's book contains three parts primarily addressing Freud, Jung, and Adler. I think I was most fascinated by the first section because it contained a concept new for me. Though I've got a good handle on Freud himself, Hillman takes us specifically into examining case history and what Freud brought to it. Ultimately, case history itself serves as a type fiction: the person telling the story of their experience(s) is presenting a fiction, their interpretation and memory of t Fascinating read! Hillman's book contains three parts primarily addressing Freud, Jung, and Adler. I think I was most fascinated by the first section because it contained a concept new for me. Though I've got a good handle on Freud himself, Hillman takes us specifically into examining case history and what Freud brought to it. Ultimately, case history itself serves as a type fiction: the person telling the story of their experience(s) is presenting a fiction, their interpretation and memory of the events; the analyst is then recording that story, with his/her (un)conscious interpretation of the events. Fascinating perspective. And, it leads us to the underlining theme of the whole text: why do our souls want this healing fiction?? In the second section, Hillman works with ideas of Jung, images, and Knowing Thyself. Just coming out of my Jungian course and really being fascinated by so much of his work, I soaked up this section. Hillman leads us into the use of active imagination and discussing healing, something of deep interest to me for my possible dissertation topic. In the third and final section, Hillman looks at Alder and what the soul wants. The focus here lies on inferiority and community, and then leads to Hillman's final conclusion on what the soul wants. He concludes that, despite that various answers he's given through out, this is the key: we don't need to know WHAT the soul wants but THAT it wants. And this is something psychotherapy can deliver.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rjyan

    There's three parts to this book, and the second felt markedly less exciting than the first, but the third part explodes with insightful revelations about Adler that are unmissable if you have never had the insights of Adler revealed to you. A little bit of background in archetypal/depth psychology-- or another Hillman book-- is probably good before jumping in to this one, as Hillman doesn't go out of his way to catch you up on the concepts he builds on top of. But the things he does build are p There's three parts to this book, and the second felt markedly less exciting than the first, but the third part explodes with insightful revelations about Adler that are unmissable if you have never had the insights of Adler revealed to you. A little bit of background in archetypal/depth psychology-- or another Hillman book-- is probably good before jumping in to this one, as Hillman doesn't go out of his way to catch you up on the concepts he builds on top of. But the things he does build are pretty incredible.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    For as much ado as I've always heard about Hillman and his works, this was not a very impressive introduction. I'll be honest, the active imagination dialogues between patients and their animas was interesting....I guess it was all fairly interesting. But it had no umph. Nothing really making me love Hillman for his contribution, or wanting to return to him anytime soon. Any other reccomendations from Hillman fans, cause I'm not one just yet? For as much ado as I've always heard about Hillman and his works, this was not a very impressive introduction. I'll be honest, the active imagination dialogues between patients and their animas was interesting....I guess it was all fairly interesting. But it had no umph. Nothing really making me love Hillman for his contribution, or wanting to return to him anytime soon. Any other reccomendations from Hillman fans, cause I'm not one just yet?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    I looked this book up because I want to re-read it - loved it in my twenties and am curious to see what I think twenty some years later.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    Love, love, LOVE this book! LOVE Hillman! He looks at Adlerian psychology versus Freud and, mostly, Jung.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Dennis

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maciek

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ted

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elissa Davis

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dominique

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathee

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Hillegass

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steve Killian

  22. 4 out of 5

    Voula Grand

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stuart Eglin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dinysio Odinysio

  25. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eliot

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rand

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eve

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mariana Freire

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...