web site hit counter The Norton Shakespeare: Based on the Oxford Edition (Second Edition, Slipcased Edition) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Norton Shakespeare: Based on the Oxford Edition (Second Edition, Slipcased Edition)

Availability: Ready to download

The attractive print and digital bundle offers students a great reading experience at an affordable price in two ways a hardcover volume for their dorm shelf and lifetime library, and a digital edition ideal for in-class use. Students can access the ebook from their computer, tablet, or smartphone via the registration code included in the print volume at no additional char The attractive print and digital bundle offers students a great reading experience at an affordable price in two ways a hardcover volume for their dorm shelf and lifetime library, and a digital edition ideal for in-class use. Students can access the ebook from their computer, tablet, or smartphone via the registration code included in the print volume at no additional charge. As one instructor summed it up, It s a long overdue step forward in the way Shakespeare is taught. "


Compare

The attractive print and digital bundle offers students a great reading experience at an affordable price in two ways a hardcover volume for their dorm shelf and lifetime library, and a digital edition ideal for in-class use. Students can access the ebook from their computer, tablet, or smartphone via the registration code included in the print volume at no additional char The attractive print and digital bundle offers students a great reading experience at an affordable price in two ways a hardcover volume for their dorm shelf and lifetime library, and a digital edition ideal for in-class use. Students can access the ebook from their computer, tablet, or smartphone via the registration code included in the print volume at no additional charge. As one instructor summed it up, It s a long overdue step forward in the way Shakespeare is taught. "

58 review for The Norton Shakespeare: Based on the Oxford Edition (Second Edition, Slipcased Edition)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shana

    The best Norton by far. The digital version enhances the physical volume and provides any student or Shakespeare enthusiast the tools to delve further into Shakespeare's work and world than any other edition. The best Norton by far. The digital version enhances the physical volume and provides any student or Shakespeare enthusiast the tools to delve further into Shakespeare's work and world than any other edition.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    more shakespeare than you could possibly imagine.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brynnan

    It would take a very long time to read its over 3000 pages, but the 5 stars are deserved because of the useful alternative words given in the margins to clarify archaic words; the succinct, useful footnotes and comments that clarify difficult phrases and idioms; the appealing font and layout; the very thorough introductions to each piece or group of pieces (e.g. the sonnets); and that all of Shakespeare is compiled in such a pleasing way into one volume. The notes are not distracting both visual It would take a very long time to read its over 3000 pages, but the 5 stars are deserved because of the useful alternative words given in the margins to clarify archaic words; the succinct, useful footnotes and comments that clarify difficult phrases and idioms; the appealing font and layout; the very thorough introductions to each piece or group of pieces (e.g. the sonnets); and that all of Shakespeare is compiled in such a pleasing way into one volume. The notes are not distracting both visually and in terms of their complexity; it is also a boon that they take up very little page space, thereby avoiding unseemly pages that are half footnotes, half text.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shaoroun

    I did it!! it only took about 2 years but I finished it! (granted not all of it but still considering it a win!)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steven Godby

    I wanted to read Richard III to understand his evil character. I have found my answer. The appearance of various ghosts and Richard feeling dread demonstrated a guilty conscience. With guilt therein is redemption. Richard III had empathy. For Hitler, Stalin, and some other butchers of humanity did not develop empathy. Both Hitler and Stalin had harsh and cruel fathers. Dr. Josef Mengele, the Angel of Death in Auschwitz, operated on twins. In one case, he professorially delivered a Jewish child, I wanted to read Richard III to understand his evil character. I have found my answer. The appearance of various ghosts and Richard feeling dread demonstrated a guilty conscience. With guilt therein is redemption. Richard III had empathy. For Hitler, Stalin, and some other butchers of humanity did not develop empathy. Both Hitler and Stalin had harsh and cruel fathers. Dr. Josef Mengele, the Angel of Death in Auschwitz, operated on twins. In one case, he professorially delivered a Jewish child, and as he left the room, he ordered the mother and the newborn child to be immediately gassed. Dr. Mengele had a cruel mother. His feelings were truncated, shelved, and buried. With callous disregard, a politician, I have forgotten his name, commented on the death of 200,000 people as “It is what it is” and remains silent on the separated children from their mothers. I have been told that his father was uncaring and harsh. A secondary and important element is guilt and shame. The terms are not synonymous. We usually think of guilt in a legal context, but it can be used in a religious context of guilt and salvation. The antonym of shame is honor. Honor and shame are far older dichotomies than guilt and redemption/innocence. Honor creates fusion in a family, tribe, and community. In Homer’s Iliad, honor is a primary virtue among the warriors. In Japan, to lose face results in suicides. Counter wise, guilt and salvation are more individualistic and one of the many byproducts of Christianity. Individuals can be saved or dammed, but kingdom, empires, and nations cannot be saved or dammed. They either thrive or expire. Later individualism replaced hierarchical and paternal communities with equal rights, popular sovereignty, and nations based upon laws. Today, many people display little shame on how they behave in public, whether talking, dressing, or posting on social media. Etiquette, politeness, and civility have been gored and debauched with toxic individuality. How can we have the dignity of man (humans) when we do not behave in an honorable manner? The BBC House of Cards starring Ian Richardson is the closest parallel to Richard III. Both are Machiavellian artists thirsting for power. They make brilliant strategic moves playing one face and then another face. Their deeds are dastardly but not genocidal. The audience can understand their motivation. We can identify with the villain. As for the audience of Hitler, Stalin, and Dr. Mengele, we cannot identify with mass killers. We cannot grasp their motivation to kill millions of people. They introduced chaos as mass death, destruction, and night. It was beyond the human pale. With Richard III, we have a morality play between good and evil. Chaos temporarily unbalanced the natural order, but the Spindle of Necessity corrected the spinning whorl. Richard III is a didactic tale ending with justice. Richard III’s redemption is our redemption. Long live Richard III!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ray Patrin

    I highly recommend this single volume compilation of the complete works of Shakespeare. All of the plays, sonnets, and poems are neatly presented, making them less intimidating to a new reader of Shakespeare, and user-friendly in general. Of course it's huge (about 3,500 pages), but it includes much in addition to Shakespeare's works. There are explanations of all archaic or ambiguous language (words, phrases, references) which are neatly presented in the margins and footnotes. Anything and ever I highly recommend this single volume compilation of the complete works of Shakespeare. All of the plays, sonnets, and poems are neatly presented, making them less intimidating to a new reader of Shakespeare, and user-friendly in general. Of course it's huge (about 3,500 pages), but it includes much in addition to Shakespeare's works. There are explanations of all archaic or ambiguous language (words, phrases, references) which are neatly presented in the margins and footnotes. Anything and everything that could be "Greek" to the modern reader is explained. ("'If then you do not like him... surely you are in some manifest danger not to understand him.'") This is all done aesthetically, allowing for gentle continuity of perusal; whether you choose to read them or not, they're not disruptive or annoying. There is a seventy-four page general introduction by the chief editor (one of a team six professors), the scholar Stephen Greenblatt, which is engaging and highly educational. This is followed by a general textual introduction; there's a preface and several intros in all. Additionally there are introductions, or analytical essays, that preface each play (or piece). These can be spoilers to the first time reader, but at times they provide a necessary heads-up explanation of what's to come, without which the "uninitiated" might be lost. For convenience there's even three tables of contents: traditional (in order of appearance, which, as presented, is believed by scholars to be the chronological order in which Shakespeare wrote them), by genre, and by publication date. Most importantly, all of Shakespeare's brilliant work is all here in one book. Accompaniment with its comprehensive educational content makes this book invaluable.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    I LOVE this book. The introductions before every play are fantastic and provide so much background information and an analysis of the character and themes in each story. I enjoyed this edition a great deal, especially because it comes with an online book that has even more great features like music, dramatic readings, etc.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Rock

    This edition is a must read for anyone with interest in the works of William Shakespeare. While on the pricy side the essay and annotated texts are well worth it even if one isnt using it for academic work

  9. 4 out of 5

    Iv

    After doing a full semester on Shakespeare, I kind of started to be disappointed and dislike him. I still like some of his plays, but the themes in the others are just bit too much.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Paulette

    What can I say - it's the Bard! What can I say - it's the Bard!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joti

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read a selection of about 12 plays and the sonnets for my Shakespeare course - i really enjoyed the plays - the comedies were great but I loved some of the tragedies, especially Othello (IAGO IS JUST THE BEST) & JC, Antony & Cleo. Then there's good old Titus, which I absolutely hate & crap like R&J Anyway, maybe I'll revisit some of the plays I haven't read next year :) I read a selection of about 12 plays and the sonnets for my Shakespeare course - i really enjoyed the plays - the comedies were great but I loved some of the tragedies, especially Othello (IAGO IS JUST THE BEST) & JC, Antony & Cleo. Then there's good old Titus, which I absolutely hate & crap like R&J Anyway, maybe I'll revisit some of the plays I haven't read next year :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alan Johnson

    Although not identified as such in the Goodreads description, this is volume one of two volumes. It is one of the best editions of Shakespeare and is supplemented by a Digital Edition (the paperback provides a registration code for same).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maisie

    Not completed. But read eight plays from this tome throughout the last six months.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Micaela

    Plays read: Taming of the Shrew A Midsummer Night’s Dream Twelfth Night Merchant of Venice Tempest Henry V Hamlet Julius Caesar

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bailey

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heather Hamilton

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ioana Radulescu

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  20. 5 out of 5

    Abby M

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kristyn

  22. 5 out of 5

    Duncan Rice

  23. 5 out of 5

    Slay Belle

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  25. 5 out of 5

    Debra Elsdon

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Claussen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jesenia Kolimas

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Cox

  30. 4 out of 5

    Crystal (Goddess in the Stacks)

  31. 4 out of 5

    Monique

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

  33. 4 out of 5

    Madison

  34. 4 out of 5

    Scarborough Family

  35. 4 out of 5

    David Lister

  36. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Nambot (macarons & paperbacks)

  37. 5 out of 5

    Rima

  38. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  39. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Edwards

  40. 4 out of 5

    C.K. Conners

  41. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  42. 5 out of 5

    Fleur

  43. 4 out of 5

    William Sugarman

  44. 5 out of 5

    Bernadette

  45. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  46. 4 out of 5

    C.A.

  47. 4 out of 5

    Jiajia

  48. 4 out of 5

    JPK

  49. 5 out of 5

    Bianca

  50. 5 out of 5

    Steph

  51. 5 out of 5

    J

  52. 4 out of 5

    Rico Davis

  53. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  54. 4 out of 5

    Valderonce

  55. 4 out of 5

    Nina

  56. 5 out of 5

    Rosie Darch

  57. 5 out of 5

    Keyholez

  58. 4 out of 5

    Raven

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.