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The Speckled Band

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Part of the High Impact series this classic text is retold in an accessible style for those with a reading age of six to seven years. Can Sherlock Holmes solve the mystery of the death of Helen's sister in time to save Helen's own life? Part of the High Impact series this classic text is retold in an accessible style for those with a reading age of six to seven years. Can Sherlock Holmes solve the mystery of the death of Helen's sister in time to save Helen's own life?


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Part of the High Impact series this classic text is retold in an accessible style for those with a reading age of six to seven years. Can Sherlock Holmes solve the mystery of the death of Helen's sister in time to save Helen's own life? Part of the High Impact series this classic text is retold in an accessible style for those with a reading age of six to seven years. Can Sherlock Holmes solve the mystery of the death of Helen's sister in time to save Helen's own life?

30 review for The Speckled Band

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    This is it. The Sherlock Holmes story I was waiting for. It’s a classic! Update: To end my 2019 reading challenge I’m reading (and in some cases rereading) the dozen stories Arthur Conan Doyle marked as his favorites. “The Speckled Band” is #1, on both his list and (so far at least) on mine. Read it! A drawn, frightened woman comes to Sherlock and Dr. Watson for help. Though Helen Stoner is only about 30, she's haggard and graying. She and her twin sister Julia have been living with their stepfa This is it. The Sherlock Holmes story I was waiting for. It’s a classic! Update: To end my 2019 reading challenge I’m reading (and in some cases rereading) the dozen stories Arthur Conan Doyle marked as his favorites. “The Speckled Band” is #1, on both his list and (so far at least) on mine. Read it! A drawn, frightened woman comes to Sherlock and Dr. Watson for help. Though Helen Stoner is only about 30, she's haggard and graying. She and her twin sister Julia have been living with their stepfather, Dr. Roylott, for several years in a decaying Victorian mansion in Surrey. He's a brutal, harsh man who spent many years living in India (not that that's a clue or anything). The family hasn't got a lot of money any more, but with the girls' inheritance they get by. Two years ago, Julia became engaged to a marine major. Within two weeks she was dead, mysteriously convulsed by pain in the middle of the night. Her last words:"It was the band! The speckled band!"Now Helen, too, is engaged, and she is sleeping temporarily in her sister's room because of house repairs that affect her own room. The night before she came to Sherlock Holmes, she woke in the middle of the night to hear a low whistle--the same sound that heralded her sister's death two years before. Luckily, she has the sense to dash off to Sherlock Holmes the next morning. Unluckily, she has been followed. Luckily, she has Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson on her team! Don't let anyone spoil this one for you! It's tense and a great read. I did a little research afterwards and I understand that there are factual inaccuracies(view spoiler)[ with the snake not actually being a type found in India, as well as its supposed taste for milk and ability to respond to a whistle (hide spoiler)] . My advice is, don't fret the details here. Just roll with it and enjoy the story! Free as part of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes short story collection, here at Project Gutenberg.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    "Oh, my God! Helen! It was the band! The speckled band!" The Adventure of the Speckled Band is one of the most ingenious of the 56 short stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle about his fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. The author himself considered this one to be his best Sherlock Holmes story. It is now published as the eighth of the twelve stories collected in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes", although it was first published in February 1892, in "The Strand" magazine. A few years late "Oh, my God! Helen! It was the band! The speckled band!" The Adventure of the Speckled Band is one of the most ingenious of the 56 short stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle about his fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. The author himself considered this one to be his best Sherlock Holmes story. It is now published as the eighth of the twelve stories collected in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes", although it was first published in February 1892, in "The Strand" magazine. A few years later, in August 1905, it was published in the USA's "New York World", under the title, "The Spotted Band. Mulling over the last "seventy-odd" cases, Watson sets the stage for relating this one, "I cannot recall any which presented more singular features than that which was associated with the well-known Surrey family of the Roylotts of Stoke Moran" adding a little later, "there are widespread rumours as to the death of Dr. Grimesby Roylott which tend to make the matter even more terrible than the truth." So the reader finds themself just a couple of paragraphs in, and hooked already. Dr. Watson remembers back to early April 1883. He had been unexpectedly woken at 7:15am by Sherlock Holmes, who was usually himself a late riser. The case was, Holmes stressed, urgent. A young lady was at that moment in their sitting room, pale and drawn, and literally shaking with fear. Holmes observes that she is around thirty, dressed in black with a black veil, and strands of premature grey in her hair. Although she is desperate for help, she apologises, saying that she cannot pay Holmes anything now, but promising Holmes that she will soon be married and have control of her own income. She further names the person by whom she has heard of the great detective, to convince him of her credentials. Of course, the matter of payment is no problem for our gallant detective. He has been analysing clues about the woman before him as she speaks, and already knows a fair bit about her. Coupled with the "reference" which he quickly checks in his case-book, this is enough for him to be intrigued by the case, as are we. The woman, Helen Stoner, tells them that she and her twin sister, Julia, are living with their stepfather, Dr. Roylott, who is now the last living member of a once great English family. The Roylotts once controlled huge estates, but their descendants are now impoverished, apart from the old house they all live in, which is now heavily mortgaged. The tension cranks up notch by notch as Helen Stoner tells her story. Dr. Grimesby Roylott had emigrated to India as soon as he obtained his medical degree, and he managed to establish a thriving practice there in Calcutta. He also married the widow of a Major-General in the Bengal Artillery, a Mrs. Stoner, who had a considerable amount of money of her own. (view spoiler)[Dr. Grimesby Roylott, we learn, is not only amoral but has a violent temper. He spent many years in India with his new wife, plus her two children from her previous marriage. During this time their house was robbed. He instantly flew into a rage, blaming his Indian butler, and was sent to prison for killing him. The family eventually returned to England, whereupon Helen Stoner's mother died tragically in a railway accident. She left quite a lot of money – one thousand pounds per year – which seemed ample for them, all to live on. Some of this money would go to the daughters on their marriage. However, since the death of their mother eight years earlier, Dr. Roylott has changed. He has grown increasingly violent, and no servants would stay in the house any more. He has wild animals from India, such as a cheetah and a baboon, which he allows to roam freely over the estate. He has frightened away all the neighbours, and his only friends are now a group of gypsies. The two young women have grown to fear their stepfather, and exactly two weeks before the day when Julia was to be married she mysteriously died, calling out to her sister, "Oh, my God! Helen! It was the band! The speckled band!" (hide spoiler)] The story is masterly in the nuggets of information it slowly reveals. It is virtually impossible to ascertain what can have happened. Dr. Grimesby Roylott himself comes to see Sherlock Holmes and presents a terrifying spectacle, the perfect foil to Holmes's suave urbanity, as he expostulates, shaking his hunting crop at Holmes, "'I know you, you scoundrel! I have heard of you before. You are Holmes the meddler.' My friend smiled. 'Holmes the busybody!' His smile broadened. 'Holmes the Scotland Yard jack-in-office.' Holmes chuckled heartily. 'Your conversation is most entertaining,' said he." We learn of alterations to the house, we think we see a perfect motive for a crime, yet still we cannot deduce it from the information given. On Sherlock Holmes's visit to the house, he isolates three significant factors: (view spoiler)[a bed anchored to the floor, a bell cord that does not work, and a ventilator hole between Helen’s room and that of Dr. Grimesby Roylott. (hide spoiler)] From these he knows all, although the reader would probably need to equal his genius to do so. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's inspiration for this story may have been an article published in February 1891, in "Cassell's Saturday Journal". (Beware - the title in the next spoiler gives away the ending!) (view spoiler)["Called on by a Boa Constrictor. A West African Adventure" is about a Portugese trader who stays in a remote camp in West Africa. On the first night in the cabin, he is awoken by a creaking sound, and sees "a dark queer-looking thing hanging down through the ventilator above it". This then has the same premise, but Conan Doyle switched the boa constrictor for a "swamp adder", a variety of snake which he invented for the purpose of the story. (hide spoiler)] Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself wrote a stage play based on "The Speckled Band". It was a great success and ran for 169 performances at the "Adelphi Theatre" before transferring to the "Globe", and subsequently went on to tour England. This was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's third stage play and the second Sherlock Holmes dramatisation. Not only does the story have a perfect structure, a story within a story, with a build-up of tension mounting alongside, as we learn the characters and personalities involved. Not only is this a perfect example of a "closed room mystery", of which Conan Doyle was to write four in total. This was his own personal favourite, perhaps because it also contains several of the recurring themes we see in many of the Sherlock Holmes stories. There is a wellbred young woman in distress, an overbearing and vulgar man, a connection with an exotic overseas country, both in location, people and animals, a problem steeped in history, a country house, a close observation of unusual architectural features, either thieves, "gypsies", or vagabonds, an aristocratic family ... But most of all, there is a problem, the solution to which is fiendishly convoluted, yet when explained, makes perfect logical sense. It also, as a bonus, has an ethically satisfying, although not strictly legal, ending. "Subtle enough and horrible enough. When a doctor does go wrong, he is the first of criminals."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    The Adventure of the Speckled Band is one of the darker Sherlock Holmes stories dealing with murder by unusual means. The story is written as if it was one of the earliest cases undertaken by Holmes and Watson as a duo, with the case being brought to the consulting detective by a scared young lady, Helen Stoner. Helen Stoner’s sister had died in mysterious circumstances, and ultimately this death proved to be one of the earliest examples in crime fiction, of a “Locked Room” mystery. Subsequently, The Adventure of the Speckled Band is one of the darker Sherlock Holmes stories dealing with murder by unusual means. The story is written as if it was one of the earliest cases undertaken by Holmes and Watson as a duo, with the case being brought to the consulting detective by a scared young lady, Helen Stoner. Helen Stoner’s sister had died in mysterious circumstances, and ultimately this death proved to be one of the earliest examples in crime fiction, of a “Locked Room” mystery. Subsequently, this type of problem was taken up by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in The Adventure of the Empty House and The Adventure of the Crooked Man; and, of course, ever since the time of Conan Doyle, crime writers have made use the locked room problem. The Adventure of the Speckled Band is of course memorable because of the murder, but it is also praised, amongst fans of Sherlock Holmes, for highlighting all of the best characteristics of the detective. In the story Holmes shows a real concern for his client, overlooking the lack of payment for services, as wells as concern for the wellbeing of Dr. Watson. The case also shows the physical strength of Holmes, and of course, his ability to deduce and extrapolate from the evidence presented to him. As with many of the Sherlock Holmes stories, The Adventure of the Speckled Band was adapted for TV by Granada, with Jeremy Brett starring as Sherlock Holmes; the adaptation being the sixth episode of the first series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    m a r y l i z

    Woooooooow. O_O This is still one of the best mysteries I've read. The suspense is incredible, and I felt my heart pounding during the climax even though I've already read this once in the past. The BEST Sherlock Holmes story that I've encountered yet - perfect for reading on a blustery autumn day! 5 stars! Woooooooow. O_O This is still one of the best mysteries I've read. The suspense is incredible, and I felt my heart pounding during the climax even though I've already read this once in the past. The BEST Sherlock Holmes story that I've encountered yet - perfect for reading on a blustery autumn day! 5 stars!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sanjay Gautam

    If it's Sherlock Holmes, you know its good. If it's Sherlock Holmes, you know its good.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    I can say that this is one of the best S.H stories, this man is rad, even with insufficient data, he managed to get things right, Sir. Arthur, chapeau!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Serethiel Sequoia

    I read this a few years ago for school, and oh my crumpets! I never thought I'd like this story, but... this is kinda what got me hooked on the BBC's Sherlock. ;) I read this a few years ago for school, and oh my crumpets! I never thought I'd like this story, but... this is kinda what got me hooked on the BBC's Sherlock. ;)

  8. 4 out of 5

    DJ

    "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" is the eighth story in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes story collection, the third publication in the Sherlock Holmes series (after the first two novels, so the first story collection). Holmes and Watson help a scared young lady who's sister died mysteriously shortly before her wedding, uttering only the words "the speckled band", and who now fears the same may happen to her as her own wedding approaches. Another twisty one, I had heard that this wa "The Adventure of the Speckled Band" is the eighth story in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes story collection, the third publication in the Sherlock Holmes series (after the first two novels, so the first story collection). Holmes and Watson help a scared young lady who's sister died mysteriously shortly before her wedding, uttering only the words "the speckled band", and who now fears the same may happen to her as her own wedding approaches. Another twisty one, I had heard that this was one of the greats a while before reading it, and I was happy to find I was not disappointed.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rob Thompson

    "I have heard, Mr. Holmes, that you can see deeply into the manifold wickedness of the human heart." One of the most creative and imaginative short stories ever written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. (view spoiler)[Helen Stoner worries her stepfather may be trying to kill her. Shortly before her wedding he moves her to the bedroom where her sister had died two years earlier. Stoner is herself now engaged. Holmes learns of a reduction of her stepfather's annuity (from the estate of his wife—​​Stoner's "I have heard, Mr. Holmes, that you can see deeply into the manifold wickedness of the human heart." One of the most creative and imaginative short stories ever written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. (view spoiler)[Helen Stoner worries her stepfather may be trying to kill her. Shortly before her wedding he moves her to the bedroom where her sister had died two years earlier. Stoner is herself now engaged. Holmes learns of a reduction of her stepfather's annuity (from the estate of his wife—​​Stoner's mother) if either sister married. On Sherlock Holmes's visit to the house, he notices three significant clues. 1. a bed fixed to the floor 2. a dummy bell cord 3. ventilator hole between rooms. As they lie in wait a whistle sounds, then a snake appears through the ventilator. Holmes attacks the snake with his riding crop; it retreats to the next room, where it attacks and kills Stoner's stepfather. (hide spoiler)] The Adventure of the Speckled Band has a satisfying structure. The reader is drip fed information. A story inside a story. There is just enough character development to make us care about the intended victim. Who is ... a well-bred young woman in distress. Factor in an overbearing cad. Sprinkle a few foreign countries. A country mansion. A few unsavoury types, thieves and gypsies. And a complex dilemma. This all goes to making this one of Doyle's best "closed room" short stories. He later dramatised this into a successful stage play. Recommended, and it even has a satisfying, although not 100% legal, ending.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Crime Addict Sifat

    Helen Stoner counsels Sherlock Holmes about the passing of her twin sister, Julia, who kicked the bucket before her wedding, crying that: "it was the Speckled Band!" Holmes must research their mom's domain and the unsavory Dr. Roylott, Helen's stepfather, who enables tramps to camp on his home and has both a cheetah and a primate going crazy in the grounds. Be that as it may, would helen be able to be accepted? Is Dr Roycroft as terrible as he appears? Furthermore, can the specked hankies worn a Helen Stoner counsels Sherlock Holmes about the passing of her twin sister, Julia, who kicked the bucket before her wedding, crying that: "it was the Speckled Band!" Holmes must research their mom's domain and the unsavory Dr. Roylott, Helen's stepfather, who enables tramps to camp on his home and has both a cheetah and a primate going crazy in the grounds. Be that as it may, would helen be able to be accepted? Is Dr Roycroft as terrible as he appears? Furthermore, can the specked hankies worn about the necks of the wanderers truly be an occurrence?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cora Tea Party Princess

    5 Words: Perfect length for a cuppa.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jaksen

    One of the classics of classics in the entire Sherlock Holmes series. A woman comes to Mr. Holmes with a strange problem involving a weird stepfather, an old house, an inheritance, wild animals which live on the estate, and yes, just what is the speckled band? When I first read this as a child I thought the 'band' might be a wandering group of some sorts, perhaps Romas or gypsies living in the woods. Then I considered it might be like a 'headband,' popular head gear when I was a girl. Or maybe it One of the classics of classics in the entire Sherlock Holmes series. A woman comes to Mr. Holmes with a strange problem involving a weird stepfather, an old house, an inheritance, wild animals which live on the estate, and yes, just what is the speckled band? When I first read this as a child I thought the 'band' might be a wandering group of some sorts, perhaps Romas or gypsies living in the woods. Then I considered it might be like a 'headband,' popular head gear when I was a girl. Or maybe it was a belt, or perhaps a Victorian-era singing group. Well read the darn story to find out what it was. It's so good I just re-read it and remembered my first time reading and being surprised, then amazed. However, I am currently reading an annotated version, and no, it doesn't spoil the story. Only adds to the enjoyment as various English-isms - some dated and some not - are spelled out for me. Anyhow, my fav. Holmes story - thus far.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Speckled Band is about the incredible lengths people will go to to avoid being convicted of a crime. The book is told from the perspective of John Watson as he reflects on one of the many cases he has observed with Sherlock. This story takes place when Watson and Sherlock still lived together on Baker Street. One morning, Watson awoke to see Sherlock standing over him, fully dressed. Sherlock explained that a woman had come to call on them and that they should both be there to hear her case. She The Speckled Band is about the incredible lengths people will go to to avoid being convicted of a crime. The book is told from the perspective of John Watson as he reflects on one of the many cases he has observed with Sherlock. This story takes place when Watson and Sherlock still lived together on Baker Street. One morning, Watson awoke to see Sherlock standing over him, fully dressed. Sherlock explained that a woman had come to call on them and that they should both be there to hear her case. Sherlock and Watson meet the woman and she introduces herself as Helen Stoner. She says that she lives with her stepfather Dr. Grimesby Roylott. Helen explains that two years ago, twin sister was supposed to be married. Their step-father showed no objections to the marriage and everything was normal for a while. One night, Helen’s sister asked Helen if she ever heard a low whistle at night. Helen said she didn’t, and her sister appeared to be slightly unnerved. Helen said that it might be the gipsies who lived on their stepfather’s plantation. Helen’s sister went back to her room and fell asleep. Later that same night, Helen heard a strange commotion from her sisters room. She heard a low whistle and then the slamming of metal. Helen rushed to her sisters room and found the door open. Inside, her sister was convulsing on the floor. Her sister said something about a speckled band through her convulsions, and then she fell unconscious. Helen rushed to get her stepfather and he called for medical help. Unfortunately, Helen’s sister died before the medics could save her. Helen explains that this happened two years ago. She says that the coroner couldn't find the cause of death when he examined her sisters body. Helen says that she is set to be getting married soon. Her stepfather has had seemingly no objections to the marriage. Helen explains that she had to move into her sisters room due to construction that is being done in her room. Helen says that the night before she came to see Sherlock, she heard a low whistle that woke her from her sleep. She couldn’t fall back asleep after she heard the whistle and left to meet Sherlock in the morning. Sherlock asks Helen a few questions about her room, and then says that he and Watson will come over to investigate it later. Helen leaves to take care of some business in the city. Shortly after Helen leaves, her stepfather enters the apartment. He demands to know what Helen was doing at Sherlock’s house. Sherlock doesn’t tell him and the stepfather becomes very agitated. He tells Sherlock not to meddle in his affairs and bends Sherlock’s fireplace poker to show that he is not one to meddle with. After the man leaves, Sherlock takes the poker and bends it back to its original form and remarks that he has to go into town to do some investigating of his own. Sherlock is gone for many hours. When he returns, he and Watson head off to Helen’s residence. They meet her there when they arrive. Helen shows them around her room and her stepfathers room. Sherlock notices a ventilator between her and her stepfather’s rooms. He notes that a person couldn’t fit through the hole. He also notices that there is a bell string that doesn’t go anywhere. Sherlock tells Helen what his plan is. Helen must send a signal to Sherlock and Watson for them to enter her house. Then Helen must escape to a nearby hotel and spend the night there. Helen does as planned and Watson and Sherlock stay in her room. After some time, Sherlock and Watson both hear a hiss from the ventilator and Sherlock springs up and lights a match. He hits something with his cane. A second later, Sherlock and Watson hear a terrible scream coming from the stepfathers room. Sherlock and Watson rush into the room and find the stepfather with a snake curled around his head. Sherlock removes the snake, and they find that the stepfather is dead. The snake has an incredibly venoms bite and it bit both Helen’s sister and the stepfather. Sherlock says that he feels partially responsible for the death of the stepfather, but he knows that there’s nothing he can do. I enjoyed yet another Sherlock story. This one was almost more mysterious, because the crime was so specific. It also took place early in Watson’s association with Sherlock, so his observation skills were not strong yet. Sherlock and Watson have an interesting bond even early in their relationships. Sherlock is very reliant on Watson to always come with him to see the cases. Even if Watson doesn’t contribute as much, Sherlock still has a lot of respect for him. I’m looking forward to reading The Engineer’s Thumb next week! -Jocelyn Kuntz, Age 15

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rob Thompson

    (view spoiler)[Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson rise unusually early one morning to meet a young woman named Helen Stoner who fears that her life is being threatened by her stepfather, Dr. Grimesby Roylott. Roylott is a doctor who practiced in Calcutta, India and was married to Helen's late mother when she was a widow living there. He is also the impoverished last survivor of what was once a wealthy but violent, ill-tempered and amoral Anglo-Saxon aristocratic family of Surrey, and has already ser (view spoiler)[Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson rise unusually early one morning to meet a young woman named Helen Stoner who fears that her life is being threatened by her stepfather, Dr. Grimesby Roylott. Roylott is a doctor who practiced in Calcutta, India and was married to Helen's late mother when she was a widow living there. He is also the impoverished last survivor of what was once a wealthy but violent, ill-tempered and amoral Anglo-Saxon aristocratic family of Surrey, and has already served a jail sentence for killing his Indian butler in a rage. Helen's twin sister had died almost two years earlier, shortly before she was to be married. Helen had heard her sister's dying words, "The speckled band!" but was unable to decode their meaning. Helen herself, troubled by the perplexing death of her sister,[3] is now engaged, and she has begun to hear strange noises and observe strange activities around Stoke Moran, the impoverished and heavily mortgaged estate where she and her stepfather live. Dr. Roylott also keeps strange company at the estate. He is friendly with a band of gypsies on the property, and has a cheetah and a baboon as pets. For some time, he has been making changes to the house. Before Helen's sister's death, he had modifications made inside the house, and is now having the outside wall repaired, forcing Helen to move into the room where her sister died. Holmes listens carefully to Helen's story and agrees to take the case. He plans a visit to the manor later in the day. Before he can leave, however, he is visited by Dr. Roylott himself, who threatens him should he interfere. Undaunted, Holmes proceeds, first to the courthouse, where he examines Helen's late mother's will, and then to the countryside. At Stoke Moran, Holmes inspects the premises carefully inside and out. Among the strange features that he discovers are a bed anchored to the floor, a bell cord that is not attached to any bell, and a ventilator hole between Helen's temporary room and that of Dr Roylott. Holmes and Watson arrange to spend the night in Helen's room. In darkness they wait until about three in the morning; suddenly, a slight metallic noise and a dim light through the ventilator prompt Holmes to action. Quickly lighting a candle, he discovers on the bell cord the "speckled band"—a venomous snake. He strikes at the snake with his walking stick, driving it back through the ventilator. Agitated, it fatally attacks Roylott, who had been waiting for it to return after killing Helen. Holmes identifies the snake as an Indian swamp adder and reveals to Watson the motive: the late wife's will had provided an annual income of £750 sterling, of which each daughter could claim one third upon marriage. Thus, Dr. Roylott plotted to remove both of his stepdaughters before they married to avoid losing most of the fortune he controlled when the daughters took with them their share of money left for them by their mother. Holmes admits his attack on the snake may make him indirectly responsible for Roylott's demise, but he doesn't foresee it troubling him, since his action saved Helen's life. (hide spoiler)] This was a great imaginative mystery. The clues are all there, as are the red herrings. It makes it hard to get to the ultimate truth, until of course, Holmes typically puts the jigsaw pieces together. Then everything falls neatly into place. The tale has everything a late Victorian story should have: :: freely roaming wild animals, :: a band of gypsies, :: a damsel in evident distress, and :: a strange and greedy stepfather. Highly recommended. It kept me guessing until the very end.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jim C

    A short story that takes place in the early days of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. In this one, a woman comes to Holmes in asking him to investigate her sister's death which occurred before her wedding day. The surviving sister is about to be married and she is afraid that she will succumb to the same fate of her sister. I am not the biggest fan of short stories but this one I thoroughly enjoyed. Maybe I enjoyed this one because I have read another adventure with these characte A short story that takes place in the early days of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. In this one, a woman comes to Holmes in asking him to investigate her sister's death which occurred before her wedding day. The surviving sister is about to be married and she is afraid that she will succumb to the same fate of her sister. I am not the biggest fan of short stories but this one I thoroughly enjoyed. Maybe I enjoyed this one because I have read another adventure with these characters. Immediately, I was transported back in time to when this story was written and immediately I could see the strength of the relationship between the two characters. As for the mystery, the clues are there for the reader to solve (I did not) and I enjoyed how the author shows the deductive reasoning of the main character and how he solves the mystery. Right away I was enthralled in the story which is critical considering there is a limited amount of pages with this short story. I am new to these adventures and I am so enjoying them. They are truly timeless.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pedram

    " Violence does, in truth, recoil upon the violent, and the schemer falls into the pit which he digs for another. " Top-notch art of deduction, data gathering and bravado to act in the face of death. The story underlines how professional and goal-oriented Sherlock Holmes was. Of note, i think the outstanding point of this plot was the grim nature of stepfather-daughter relationship due to financial matters; very very interesting. Not the first time Conan Doyle unmasks crooked intrafamilial affair " Violence does, in truth, recoil upon the violent, and the schemer falls into the pit which he digs for another. " Top-notch art of deduction, data gathering and bravado to act in the face of death. The story underlines how professional and goal-oriented Sherlock Holmes was. Of note, i think the outstanding point of this plot was the grim nature of stepfather-daughter relationship due to financial matters; very very interesting. Not the first time Conan Doyle unmasks crooked intrafamilial affairs.

  17. 4 out of 5

    cass☽

    First of the Sherlock Holmes stories I've ever read and I loved it. I had pretty high expectations because of the TV show but wooooow, okay, I'm going out to read all the rest of his stories and marvel in how awesome they are, if they're anything like this one. First of the Sherlock Holmes stories I've ever read and I loved it. I had pretty high expectations because of the TV show but wooooow, okay, I'm going out to read all the rest of his stories and marvel in how awesome they are, if they're anything like this one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dorian

    This was a super intriguing one. I am not sure why the woman would not let Holmes and Watson speak of the events until her untimely death, but this was one of the more interesting stories, in my opinion. It really had me scratching my head at what the hell the speckled band was, which I really loved because it was interesting. The story had a very sinister tone to it, which I picked up on right away. Overall, I definitely really loved this one!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eye of Sauron

    I know this is supposed to be one of the best Sherlock Holmes stories, and one of Doyle's own favorites, but I couldn't help being underwhelmed. The solution is unlikely, the motive a stretch, and I can't shake the feeling that his research is entirely made up. I know this is supposed to be one of the best Sherlock Holmes stories, and one of Doyle's own favorites, but I couldn't help being underwhelmed. The solution is unlikely, the motive a stretch, and I can't shake the feeling that his research is entirely made up.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vinay Leo

    One of my favorite stories of Sherlock Holmes :-)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kathrin

    This case is so far my favorite out of this series. We finally get to following along while the case develops instead of listening to the explanations of the perpetrators or Sherlock himself.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bayan Al-Halabi

    I like this short story..

  23. 4 out of 5

    Noor Alsalahat

    It is beautiful to read and important to who like mystery

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Mclaren

    A quick read of a great mystery by the master. I haven't read this in years but I was taken by the story, the dialogue and the cleverness of the character and story's conclusion. Who but a master can lay out in just a few pages (remember that this story is less than 30 pages long) an intriguing and mysterious set of clues and then when all the obvious possible solutions are proven wrong, can come to the correct solution? Just masterful!!! A quick read of a great mystery by the master. I haven't read this in years but I was taken by the story, the dialogue and the cleverness of the character and story's conclusion. Who but a master can lay out in just a few pages (remember that this story is less than 30 pages long) an intriguing and mysterious set of clues and then when all the obvious possible solutions are proven wrong, can come to the correct solution? Just masterful!!!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    Very entertaining. This is my first Sherlock Holmes story, and it makes me want to read more!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Sinister dealings and Holmes in action! The Speckled Band gets Sherlock Holmes out of his Baker Street residence for a night and shows that he's quick in more ways than one. This may have been the very first Holmes story I ever read if I'm remembering correctly and it was a joy to read again! Sinister dealings and Holmes in action! The Speckled Band gets Sherlock Holmes out of his Baker Street residence for a night and shows that he's quick in more ways than one. This may have been the very first Holmes story I ever read if I'm remembering correctly and it was a joy to read again!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jason Parent

    This might be my favorite so far...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jess the Shelf-Declared Bibliophile

    An eerie tale with a satisfying ending.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Badseedgirl

    Apparently Sherlock Holmes just refuses to bring killers to the proper authorities.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Su

    The Adventure Of The Speckled Band is one of the finest among the Sherlock Holmes stories. What makes the story so special is that it is being one of four Sherlock Holmes stories which contains locked room murder. The story focuses on a bride who lost her sister , named Helen who is in the fear of death. She thinks she will be murdered with the same way that her sister died and she has this feeling that she will face the same fate. As a result of this fear she goes to Holmes and his reliable com The Adventure Of The Speckled Band is one of the finest among the Sherlock Holmes stories. What makes the story so special is that it is being one of four Sherlock Holmes stories which contains locked room murder. The story focuses on a bride who lost her sister , named Helen who is in the fear of death. She thinks she will be murdered with the same way that her sister died and she has this feeling that she will face the same fate. As a result of this fear she goes to Holmes and his reliable companion, also our narrator as always, Dr. Watson to find out who her sister’s murderer is and what was the meaning behind her last words which were “speckled band”. As we read through this detective mystery, what happened comes to light. Conan Doyle slows the reader down in such an intense description like no other can. The story takes place in Helen’s sisters room which is locked on the inside. Descriptive expression is what catches the readers’ attention. His way of story telling combined with Watson’s reliability creates a safe heaven for us readers even thought it is a murder mystery. The story’s keystone is “violence recoil up on the violent” since the justice was made in the end even if it was a consequence of a defence. The events that take place are seemingly in impossible situations so this makes it’s sub-genre detective fiction as we all see from all the Sherlock Holmes fictions. Impossible situations occurs generally such as locked doors with no way of entry. This locked doors symbolizes the inescapeable nature of death, no matter how much you try to escape from it, you are just trapped inside. On top of everything, this short story is a great introduction for Sherlock tales for the ones who never read Holmes before as it depicts all of it’s great qualities in one example. And for any mystery readers who are probably already admire Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, will like to feel the thrill with one of the interesting one in this series of masterpieces.

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