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Looking at Photographs: 100 Pictures from the Collection of the Museum of Modern Art

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Originally published in 1973, this survey of The Museum of Modern Art's photography collection explores the evolution of the photographic medium using specific examples to illustrate its development. In concise analyses, John Szarkowski investigates the aesthetic, formal, social and historical issues of 100 photographs selected from the Modern's collections. This archive o Originally published in 1973, this survey of The Museum of Modern Art's photography collection explores the evolution of the photographic medium using specific examples to illustrate its development. In concise analyses, John Szarkowski investigates the aesthetic, formal, social and historical issues of 100 photographs selected from the Modern's collections. This archive of pictures contains a vast range of works from familiar and not-so-familiar photographers. Included are some the of most recognizable pictures of the past 150 years by acknowledged masters of their field such as Adamson, Cameron, Stieglitz, Weston, Cartier-Bresson, Cunningham, Arbus and Frank.


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Originally published in 1973, this survey of The Museum of Modern Art's photography collection explores the evolution of the photographic medium using specific examples to illustrate its development. In concise analyses, John Szarkowski investigates the aesthetic, formal, social and historical issues of 100 photographs selected from the Modern's collections. This archive o Originally published in 1973, this survey of The Museum of Modern Art's photography collection explores the evolution of the photographic medium using specific examples to illustrate its development. In concise analyses, John Szarkowski investigates the aesthetic, formal, social and historical issues of 100 photographs selected from the Modern's collections. This archive of pictures contains a vast range of works from familiar and not-so-familiar photographers. Included are some the of most recognizable pictures of the past 150 years by acknowledged masters of their field such as Adamson, Cameron, Stieglitz, Weston, Cartier-Bresson, Cunningham, Arbus and Frank.

30 review for Looking at Photographs: 100 Pictures from the Collection of the Museum of Modern Art

  1. 4 out of 5

    رؤیا

    "زن در لباس مشکی از ایروینگ پن عکاس مُد و پرتره آمریکایی در سال 1950 – موضوع راستین این عکس خط پرپیچ و تاب بسیار ظریفی است که این شکل سایه نما را ترسیم میکند. چنین خطی چندان هم با بدن زنانه یا لباسهای واقعی ومعمولی ارتباط ندارد, بلکه بیشتر با حالت ایده آلی از آراستگی و وقار شکوفا در ارتباط است که روزگاری بعضی زنهای استثنایی و طراحان لباسشان, سودای آن را در سر داشتند." صد عکس از موزه هنرهای مدرن نیویورک به انتخاب جان سارکوفسکی رییس بخش عکاسی موزه و تاریخنگار و تحلیلگر عکاسی از زاویه احساساتی که عک "زن در لباس مشکی از ایروینگ پن عکاس مُد و پرتره آمریکایی در سال 1950 – موضوع راستین این عکس خط پرپیچ و تاب بسیار ظریفی است که این شکل سایه نما را ترسیم میکند. چنین خطی چندان هم با بدن زنانه یا لباسهای واقعی ومعمولی ارتباط ندارد, بلکه بیشتر با حالت ایده آلی از آراستگی و وقار شکوفا در ارتباط است که روزگاری بعضی زنهای استثنایی و طراحان لباسشان, سودای آن را در سر داشتند." صد عکس از موزه هنرهای مدرن نیویورک به انتخاب جان سارکوفسکی رییس بخش عکاسی موزه و تاریخنگار و تحلیلگر عکاسی از زاویه احساساتی که عکس ها را معنی دار کرده است. کتابی مفید برای علاقه مندان به عکاسی و جالب برای خوانندگان عادی.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Singh

    The book is a brilliant summary of MOMA's first forty years of collecting and documenting photographs. Through selected 100 photographs as a reader one understands the not always so linear journey and development of photography. The photographs reproduced here are brilliant examples of Albumen print, Calotypes, Daguerreo types, Ambrotypes and Woodbury types. A good reference book for all who want to understand art of photography appreciation The book is a brilliant summary of MOMA's first forty years of collecting and documenting photographs. Through selected 100 photographs as a reader one understands the not always so linear journey and development of photography. The photographs reproduced here are brilliant examples of Albumen print, Calotypes, Daguerreo types, Ambrotypes and Woodbury types. A good reference book for all who want to understand art of photography appreciation

  3. 5 out of 5

    Narjes Dorzade

    . بی نظیر

  4. 5 out of 5

    Parisa Hoseini

    همانطور که در آپدیت‌ها هم اشاره کردم این کتاب برای دانشجویان و کسانی که به عکاسی علاقه‌ممند هستند بسیار مفید است. در مقدمه‌ی آن فرشید آذرنگ ، مترجم کتاب، درآمدی برنقد عکس نوشته که برای من آموزنده بود. در ادامه عکس‌هایی از عکاسان قرن بیستم انتخاب شدند که در موزه هنرهای مدرن نیویورک قرار دارند. این عکس‌ها بهترین عکس‌های عکاسانشان و بهترین عکس‌های موزه نیستند، اما سارکوفسکی با انتخاب آنها سعی کرده سیری تاریخی را دنبال کند. راستش من بیشتر به این کتاب به عنوان مرجع نگاه می‌کنم. هرچند که نوشته‌های سار همانطور که در آپدیت‌ها هم اشاره کردم این کتاب برای دانشجویان و کسانی که به عکاسی علاقه‌ممند هستند بسیار مفید است. در مقدمه‌ی آن فرشید آذرنگ ، مترجم کتاب، درآمدی برنقد عکس نوشته که برای من آموزنده بود. در ادامه عکس‌هایی از عکاسان قرن بیستم انتخاب شدند که در موزه هنرهای مدرن نیویورک قرار دارند. این عکس‌ها بهترین عکس‌های عکاسانشان و بهترین عکس‌های موزه نیستند، اما سارکوفسکی با انتخاب آنها سعی کرده سیری تاریخی را دنبال کند. راستش من بیشتر به این کتاب به عنوان مرجع نگاه می‌کنم. هرچند که نوشته‌های سارکوفسکی بسیار کوتاه است اما دید خوبی از عکاس به مخاطب می دهد. من هر وقت عکس‌های یک عکاس را ببینم، نوشته‌ی سارکوفسکی درباره آن عکاس و یکی از عکس‌هایش را هم می‌خوانم و این باعث می‌شود درک بهتری از دوره تاریخی و سبک عکاس داشته باشم. باز هم تاکید می‌کنم نوشته‌های سارکوفسکی کوتاه‌ اما مفید هستند.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Hathaway

    A must read for the burgeoning photographer. Szarkowski examines the importance of 100 photographs from the MOMA collection. I think this is the 5th time I have read this cover to cover, and each time i discover something new and insightful. It has definately changed the way I view and analyze photography.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Leonard

    I've read and looked at this book at least twice before but it's still a quick visual of the history of photography. The photograph are all from different photographers so you don't see much of anyone's work, but the printed information is valuable also. Great and already well known by those who are interested in photography. This one will be around for a long time. I've read and looked at this book at least twice before but it's still a quick visual of the history of photography. The photograph are all from different photographers so you don't see much of anyone's work, but the printed information is valuable also. Great and already well known by those who are interested in photography. This one will be around for a long time.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ray Dunsmore

    A fascinating overview of the first hundred years of photographic history, guided by the persuasive pen of famed MoMA curator John Szarkowski. It's a great starter's guide for anyone interested in the artistic possibilities of photography. A fascinating overview of the first hundred years of photographic history, guided by the persuasive pen of famed MoMA curator John Szarkowski. It's a great starter's guide for anyone interested in the artistic possibilities of photography.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jolie

    A fascinating look at some of the photographs that helped shape the art. Great history and facts although the author's personal commentary was a little dated at times. A fascinating look at some of the photographs that helped shape the art. Great history and facts although the author's personal commentary was a little dated at times.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Great photographs accompanied by pretentious, artsy-fartsy gobbledygook.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Meagan

    This book was full of striking, impressive, or otherwise important photographs accompanied by a few paragraphs about why each photograph was selected to represent both the history of photography and the overall collection at the Museum of Modern Art. The included photos are inarguably important ones, and the paragraphs do a good job of placing them in historical and artistic context while remaining brief introductions, leaving the focus on the images themselves. I will say that the accompanying This book was full of striking, impressive, or otherwise important photographs accompanied by a few paragraphs about why each photograph was selected to represent both the history of photography and the overall collection at the Museum of Modern Art. The included photos are inarguably important ones, and the paragraphs do a good job of placing them in historical and artistic context while remaining brief introductions, leaving the focus on the images themselves. I will say that the accompanying text is stronger at the beginning, which might be because the earlier photos have a proven importance or impact. It's an easy choice to include early photos taken with a new style of development, or the first aerial photos, or early attempts at photographic abstraction. As the photos near the current day (although the latest photo in the book was taken in the late 60s, which is far from contemporary) the explanations about their significance are often more convoluted or technical and, for me, less persuasive. The other issues I have may be more a symptom of larger issues involving photography in general and the collection of the museum: First, the photographers included aren't generally diverse, which the author addresses directly. Access to photographic equipment and training was largely limited to affluent, or at least middle class, white males, especially in the early days of photography. This is a great explanation for the whiteness of early photographs and photographers, but doesn't explain why later photographs weren't more diverse in both photographer and subject. Representation of female photographers was much better, with photographs from Julia Margaret Cameron and Margaret Bourke-White to Helen Levitt and Lisette Model. Second, I wonder why 100% of the photographs are black and white. Again, a large portion of this is a result of the history of photography itself. For decades photographs only came in black and white, but there have been years of tinted and color film photographs and none of them were represented. I'm not sure if that was on purpose, or just an example of a bias toward black and white film as more formal or artistic... Nevertheless, I'd recommend spending time with this book. It does a very good job of providing an overview of photography as an art form.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike Kleine

    I expected something different. Something, more along the lines of absolute analysis. I had heard the name Szarkowski before but wasn't familiar with his voice. I can say I was not disappointed. A tome such as this takes patience to completely appreciate, and also, is the kind that encourages repeat re-reads/views. Absolutely essential to becoming exposed to what makes a photograph "great." Also enjoyed what I felt were tangents--though fascinating to see Szarkowski attempt to tie-in everything out I expected something different. Something, more along the lines of absolute analysis. I had heard the name Szarkowski before but wasn't familiar with his voice. I can say I was not disappointed. A tome such as this takes patience to completely appreciate, and also, is the kind that encourages repeat re-reads/views. Absolutely essential to becoming exposed to what makes a photograph "great." Also enjoyed what I felt were tangents--though fascinating to see Szarkowski attempt to tie-in everything out of nothing. Not something you will enjoy, particularly, if what you are after, involves the basics of photography. This is less about the technical and mostly about the visual. An appreciation as it were, that can, of course, also become worthy study material. Or rather, think of it this way: let's pretend you are majoring in photography and somehow you manage to skip the introductory courses and are fast tracked to one of the advanced 300-level courses; this is the type of book that would be discussed in such a course. And let's also pretend you know nothing about photography, why not? You might scoff at this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I enjoyed the photographs, all black and white, taken from 1845 to 1969. The accompanying text to the photos was a bit hit or miss so I dinged it a star for that. Each photo gets its own page with text opposite. The writing about the early photographic processes is quite interesting. Then the text becomes more about the photographers, and then the author rambles into highly speculative and assumptive territory when it seems he doesn't know much about the photographer or the particular photo. The p I enjoyed the photographs, all black and white, taken from 1845 to 1969. The accompanying text to the photos was a bit hit or miss so I dinged it a star for that. Each photo gets its own page with text opposite. The writing about the early photographic processes is quite interesting. Then the text becomes more about the photographers, and then the author rambles into highly speculative and assumptive territory when it seems he doesn't know much about the photographer or the particular photo. The photos are an interesting look at the evolution of photography over time but well before the advent of digital cameras. This book of photos covers the days when you could have been the first to photograph something.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    One of the best books of photography criticism that I've ever read. Organized as a series of 100 sets of facing pages, Szarkowski's meditations are just as interesting when they're about a photographer from the 1860s as they are when he's dealing with photographers from the 1960s, whose careers he personally created during his tenure as the lead photo curator at MoMA. This isn't a detailed history of photography, or a sweeping critical work in the style of Sontag's On Photography-- but you walk One of the best books of photography criticism that I've ever read. Organized as a series of 100 sets of facing pages, Szarkowski's meditations are just as interesting when they're about a photographer from the 1860s as they are when he's dealing with photographers from the 1960s, whose careers he personally created during his tenure as the lead photo curator at MoMA. This isn't a detailed history of photography, or a sweeping critical work in the style of Sontag's On Photography-- but you walk away feeling like you've learned things about photography that you didn't know before.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    In a world filled with amazing photo books, this is one of the best. The writing is entertaining and informative, and the photographs themselves are both well-selected and gorgeously printed. Szarkowsky manages to have something impressive to say about each photographer's approach to his or her subject matter, and the whole book left me feeling really good about my own work and potential. I had multiple flashbacks to my photo-history classes, in a good way. (I love this art form, dammit.) In a world filled with amazing photo books, this is one of the best. The writing is entertaining and informative, and the photographs themselves are both well-selected and gorgeously printed. Szarkowsky manages to have something impressive to say about each photographer's approach to his or her subject matter, and the whole book left me feeling really good about my own work and potential. I had multiple flashbacks to my photo-history classes, in a good way. (I love this art form, dammit.)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Hemenway

    This is a book that leaves you wanting more... it feels like a well curated show. Each essay, each photograph made me want to delve deeper. It is a book to savor slowly, taking in Szarkowski's essays and viewing the photographs individually as well as a collection. This is a book that leaves you wanting more... it feels like a well curated show. Each essay, each photograph made me want to delve deeper. It is a book to savor slowly, taking in Szarkowski's essays and viewing the photographs individually as well as a collection.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roniq

    A great book that breaks down different images to give you an idea of what the artist was thinking or trying to convey with their images. I enjoyed this book alot and it helped me in looking at other peoples images and what to look for.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    I posted a mini-review of the book on my blog here. I posted a mini-review of the book on my blog here.

  18. 4 out of 5

    M. Sarki

    Quite a remarkable book to own and admire from time to time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mark Petrick

    This is the best book for learning to appreciate photography, both as an art and as a cultural force.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Meg Clayton

    photography

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Youngstrom

    My review from September 30, 1997 My review from September 30, 1997

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ben Royal

    Szarkowski's comments on each of the 100 photographs are marvelous. A book a return to time and again. Szarkowski's comments on each of the 100 photographs are marvelous. A book a return to time and again.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    Great read. It is interesting to hear what Szarkowski thinks about a given photograph.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Bradley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mona

  26. 5 out of 5

    John P.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bill Mudge

  29. 4 out of 5

    Subhas Ghosh

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dana

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