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Korea Strait

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Commander Dan Lenson is assigned to conduct a major international naval exercise, with players from South Korea, the USA, Great Britain, Japan, and Australia. But old alliances are unravelling and one night at sea in a South Korean frigate, it seems that World War III is about to begin.


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Commander Dan Lenson is assigned to conduct a major international naval exercise, with players from South Korea, the USA, Great Britain, Japan, and Australia. But old alliances are unravelling and one night at sea in a South Korean frigate, it seems that World War III is about to begin.

30 review for Korea Strait

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nooilforpacifists

    By far the best of the series. Plot works; author isn't trying to force-feed anti-military attitudes, lots of interesting new information, and more suspense than any Lenson novel since The Command (but, unlike that one, the suspense here is evenly baked, not crammed into the end). By far the best of the series. Plot works; author isn't trying to force-feed anti-military attitudes, lots of interesting new information, and more suspense than any Lenson novel since The Command (but, unlike that one, the suspense here is evenly baked, not crammed into the end).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Kazokas

    Like an aged diesel-powered submarine, David Poyer's "Korea Strait" gets off to a slow start. In fact, the first 200 pages or so are packed with the mundane. Excessive detail about tactical submarine exercises and maneuvers in waters off the South Korean coast. Superfluous visceral details about ship stench when at sea for weeks at a time, and the rot of unappetizing food like kimchi hanging in the air. Somewhere amid it all, however, a story develops. A hero emerges and deeper themes involving m Like an aged diesel-powered submarine, David Poyer's "Korea Strait" gets off to a slow start. In fact, the first 200 pages or so are packed with the mundane. Excessive detail about tactical submarine exercises and maneuvers in waters off the South Korean coast. Superfluous visceral details about ship stench when at sea for weeks at a time, and the rot of unappetizing food like kimchi hanging in the air. Somewhere amid it all, however, a story develops. A hero emerges and deeper themes involving mission, success, failure and duty take hold. The final 60 pages or so captivate into a riveting, gut-checking conclusion that rewards the reader who sustains interest and remains character-loyal. Former Naval officer Dan Lenson is at the center of this book's sideways paradigm, which drones on for far too many chapters about the twists, turns, and the unforeseen circumstances of exercises involving ships from the U.S., South Korea and other Asian-Pacific nations, both above and below the waters in the world's most hostile region. Lenson has been assigned to a neutral task group, essentially charged with observing and recording the exercises, ultimately to assess South Korea's naval readiness in the event of an underwater infiltration from the North. Amid this process, not one but two typhoons nearly scuttle the whole operation, and a group of North Korean subs actually does infiltrate South Korean waters. As the novel progresses to a more right-side up plot line, Lenson anguishes against extreme fatigue, nausea and hopeless odds to come up with a solution before the world is drawn into irreversible destruction. The closing chapters pack less unsettling description and a far more powerful narrative in bringing the book to satisfying culmination, rescuing what could have been an utter waste of time. The book rounds out nicely to a 3-star rating, which may have even touched 4 if not for the angony of the first 200 pages. This read would definitely be enticing to fans of the very niche genre of submarine thrillers. When inspired, Poyer's writing packs an almost literary, flowing style of description and character exploration.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James Murphy

    "Korea Strait," the tenth book in the Dan Lenson series, finds Commander Lenson back on sea duty, this time as a member of a Tactical Analysis Group (TAG) team participating in a multi-nation military exercise off the east coast of South Korea. Dan and part of the TAG analysts are aboard "Chung Nam," a South Korean navy frigate serving as the flagship for the exercise. Dan encounters some culture shock with his South Korean counterparts, as well as Korean cuisine. Things heat up, though, when No "Korea Strait," the tenth book in the Dan Lenson series, finds Commander Lenson back on sea duty, this time as a member of a Tactical Analysis Group (TAG) team participating in a multi-nation military exercise off the east coast of South Korea. Dan and part of the TAG analysts are aboard "Chung Nam," a South Korean navy frigate serving as the flagship for the exercise. Dan encounters some culture shock with his South Korean counterparts, as well as Korean cuisine. Things heat up, though, when North Korea begins what could be another conflict along the DMZ. In addition, several unidentified submarines appear in the exercise area, refusing to identify themselves. Dan fears the worst when it's determined that this submarine wolfpack has a nuclear capability... David Poyer once again provides an engrossing story, mixing political intrigue and intense action. If you're a fan of military thrillers, "Korea Strait" is well worth reading.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    First time reading one of Poyer's books. Not up there with a more complicated/multiple storyline type of book like Clancy but a easy and enjoyable read. Grabbed this one and a couple others to try out. It is a timely story given the stuff happening over there now and seems a plausible story line with some good action after a bit of a slow start. Some focus on technology but not overly heavy on it. First time reading one of Poyer's books. Not up there with a more complicated/multiple storyline type of book like Clancy but a easy and enjoyable read. Grabbed this one and a couple others to try out. It is a timely story given the stuff happening over there now and seems a plausible story line with some good action after a bit of a slow start. Some focus on technology but not overly heavy on it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Frederic S

    Duty with Honor Believing that foe and friend were human beings with respect and honor a basic part of their humanity dictated that peace was the ultimate reward.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tom Mahan

    Over all, not too bad. After a long meandering build up there was a very good action section of the book. Followed by a "my publisher wants this done tomorrow" ending. Over all, not too bad. After a long meandering build up there was a very good action section of the book. Followed by a "my publisher wants this done tomorrow" ending.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul J. Petersen

    Another good Poyer book An interesting story and relevant with recent developments with north Korea. Always good with details, this one does not disappoint.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kieran Smith

    Dan Lenson is back again, this time riding on a South Korean Frigate as part of a Naval TAG team observing a multinational exercise in Korean waters. Events take a turn when a group of unidentified submarines head for South Korean waters. The plot is fairly predictable, in fact most of it is contained in the blurb and the outcome is never really in question. On the other hand the mechanics of how that outcome is achieved are interesting, imaginative and as far as I can tell, plausible. Mr Poyer' Dan Lenson is back again, this time riding on a South Korean Frigate as part of a Naval TAG team observing a multinational exercise in Korean waters. Events take a turn when a group of unidentified submarines head for South Korean waters. The plot is fairly predictable, in fact most of it is contained in the blurb and the outcome is never really in question. On the other hand the mechanics of how that outcome is achieved are interesting, imaginative and as far as I can tell, plausible. Mr Poyer's time on the frigate that is the novel's principle setting allows him to create a very detailed environment for the story. This is also helped by his vivid descriptions that at times quite artfully paint a picture instead of just constructing the scene. He obviously cares a lot about his subject matter. His knowledge of the tactics and weapon systems is used to good effect, illustrating an ASW operation which keeps the novel interesting. It's not often hard to guess where the character arcs are going though this isn't all bad as Lenson is easy to cheer for and you can emphasize with his righteous indignation as once again everyone seems to have a vendetta against him. Poyer's characterizations are sometimes a bit heavy handed but he certainly knows how to make you care about his character's fates. Power relations between people and the ways these relations effect responsibility seems to be a thematic element that runs through all of Poyer's Lenson novels. His musings on that theme form an interesting conclusion to this novel and help it end on a strong note.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    #10 in the Dan Lenson series. Commander Dan Lenson is an American naval officer who manages to get assigned to unusual ships and situations. #10 - Commander Dan Lenson is assigned to a TAG unit that will travel with South Korean units, to gather data for later analysis, as they engage in ASW exercises with Japanese, Australian and American units. A typhoon disrupts the war-games and the non-Korean units depart, leaving the small Korean task force to engage a sub pack, with an atomic signature, he #10 in the Dan Lenson series. Commander Dan Lenson is an American naval officer who manages to get assigned to unusual ships and situations. #10 - Commander Dan Lenson is assigned to a TAG unit that will travel with South Korean units, to gather data for later analysis, as they engage in ASW exercises with Japanese, Australian and American units. A typhoon disrupts the war-games and the non-Korean units depart, leaving the small Korean task force to engage a sub pack, with an atomic signature, heading for Korea.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    Military at sea. I'd not read any of the Dan Lenson tales, so any references to his other exploits were lost to me. But I do love a sea story. Braving typhoons and a sudden attack by North Korea, the action is tense, and the idea that the real attack might come from sea on Pusan and its strategic depth and location for military supply purposes was interesting and something to note. The romanized Korean was odd. Military at sea. I'd not read any of the Dan Lenson tales, so any references to his other exploits were lost to me. But I do love a sea story. Braving typhoons and a sudden attack by North Korea, the action is tense, and the idea that the real attack might come from sea on Pusan and its strategic depth and location for military supply purposes was interesting and something to note. The romanized Korean was odd.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mark Giordano

    I just could not get into this book. I was halfway done with it, I really had no idea what the story line was and I was dangerously close to putting it down. I trudge through and the last 100 pages were better but overall it was a struggle to finish this off. May be a great read for someone who served in the Navy but as a layman I was pretty bored.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    Great Naval fiction. This time Lensen is riding a South Korean warship during an exercise. Great job capturing the different cultural philosophical differences between Korean and American Navies. Timely and current with todays frictions between North and South Korea.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Compared to the other Poyer books I've read, it was marginally better. The plot wasn't as totally unbelievable as the others and the action was even suspenseful at times. Still, I wouldn't rush to recommend it. Compared to the other Poyer books I've read, it was marginally better. The plot wasn't as totally unbelievable as the others and the action was even suspenseful at times. Still, I wouldn't rush to recommend it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

    Poyer does not disappoint again with another Dan Lensen thriller. Lots of technical stuff that I don't understand, but I really like his writing anyway. He just keeps getting better. Poyer does not disappoint again with another Dan Lensen thriller. Lots of technical stuff that I don't understand, but I really like his writing anyway. He just keeps getting better.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    David Poyer's books start out slow but when the action starts it is non stop. I am still neutral on this series but I will reserve final judgement until I have read more David Poyer's books start out slow but when the action starts it is non stop. I am still neutral on this series but I will reserve final judgement until I have read more

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Cmdr. Dan Lensen's 10th outing. Cmdr. Dan Lensen's 10th outing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    stan

    A Bit slow, Full of Acronyms............I wish they could lit them at the back of the Book

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kehrberg

  19. 4 out of 5

    O.vdveer

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Krieger

  22. 5 out of 5

    Travis

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ric Ulloa

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jbleech

  25. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Vaughn

  26. 4 out of 5

    Craig Pearson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Reichart

  28. 5 out of 5

    daniel brewington

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  30. 4 out of 5

    John A. Yannacci Sr.

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