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The Karla Trilogy Digital Collection Featuring George Smiley: Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, The Honourable Schoolboy, Smiley's People

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More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

30 review for The Karla Trilogy Digital Collection Featuring George Smiley: Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, The Honourable Schoolboy, Smiley's People

  1. 4 out of 5

    Randy Wanis

    It takes a while to get into Le Carre's sometimes dizzying and thoroughly British prose style -- full of terms and phrases only those born and raised in the Kingdom can read in a breezy way. But once I grew accustomed to the style and the seemingly glitchy way many of the characters speak, I found it served to hold the reader at an appropriate distance such that the utter "foreignness" of the subject matter (espionage) is even more pronounced and shrouded in a mystique reserved for a British eli It takes a while to get into Le Carre's sometimes dizzying and thoroughly British prose style -- full of terms and phrases only those born and raised in the Kingdom can read in a breezy way. But once I grew accustomed to the style and the seemingly glitchy way many of the characters speak, I found it served to hold the reader at an appropriate distance such that the utter "foreignness" of the subject matter (espionage) is even more pronounced and shrouded in a mystique reserved for a British elite... an elite that appears to be sullen and watchful compared to the more vigorous and well-funded Cousins (Americans). This distance and opaqueness premiates the series, but allows for a committed reader to be duly and fully rewarded with the crescendos of an ever engulfing plot. Warning. Those expecting either a James Bond or a Jason Borne character to kick down doors or rappel down mountains in a blaze of bullets and explosions will be disappointed with the pace of these books. It will seem plodding and introspective. Boring, even. But I would just as soon find someone boring if they found these books boring. Take the lead character, George Smiley: he is everything Bond and Borne is not. He is aging, portly, and borderline antisocial. But it's his meticulous mind and pristine tradecraft that drive the plot. Other characters are fully explored and more than adequately provide the admittedly necessary excitement and impulsiveness lacking in Smiley. These books are just as much detective novels as they are works of espionage. And as is fitting for a protagonist such as Smiley, the detective work constantly zooms inward to the personal and psychological as often as it does outward to the global and strategic. I was sad to have finished it, but heartened by one of my favorite characters, George Smiley.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Kass

    Nobody does it like John LeCarré, absolutely the best of the genre. And the BBC dramatizations did him justice.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Karl Nehring

    Read the three novels in this collection a few decades ago and really loved them. But if anything, reading all three in quick succession this past week has been even more enjoyable. Today I ordered the "Tinker, Tailor" DVD. I enjoyed the BBC productions when PBS showed them back in the day. Nostalgia time, I guess, but really, these books are MOST enjoyable! Read the three novels in this collection a few decades ago and really loved them. But if anything, reading all three in quick succession this past week has been even more enjoyable. Today I ordered the "Tinker, Tailor" DVD. I enjoyed the BBC productions when PBS showed them back in the day. Nostalgia time, I guess, but really, these books are MOST enjoyable!

  4. 5 out of 5

    April

    The absolute best of the espionage genre. Le Carre is a keen observer of human behavior, and often reveals insights even into the human heart. The good guys aren't that good. The bad guys - maybe not much worse. You never know where his stories will take you - and the ride is always worth it. The absolute best of the espionage genre. Le Carre is a keen observer of human behavior, and often reveals insights even into the human heart. The good guys aren't that good. The bad guys - maybe not much worse. You never know where his stories will take you - and the ride is always worth it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Noel Hynd

    Perhaps the best modern spy story ever, based loosely upon the Kim Philby scandal that rocked British and US intelligence in the early 1960's. Brilliant, complex and moody..... Perhaps the best modern spy story ever, based loosely upon the Kim Philby scandal that rocked British and US intelligence in the early 1960's. Brilliant, complex and moody.....

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ejkrane

    These are the classic and perhaps the best novels about spycraft and the Cold War to be published by a masterful author.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Viktor Bach

    Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy ✮ ✮ ✮ ✮ The Honorable Schoolboy ✮ ✮ ✮ Smiley's People ✮ ✮ ✮ ✮ Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy ✮ ✮ ✮ ✮ The Honorable Schoolboy ✮ ✮ ✮ Smiley's People ✮ ✮ ✮ ✮

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heman

    I think the first and last books of the trilogy (and it’s very loosely a trilogy at all) are the better books and stories here, in that order. The middle book, The Honourable Schoolboy (HS), is a dated and ridiculous story, told with head scratching comical exaggerations and a very typical 70’s movie ending: the protagonist is shot by the man, camera zooms out from a helicopter shot. I could not stop thinking that Le Carré had a big budget Hollywood movie script in mind while writing it, and if I think the first and last books of the trilogy (and it’s very loosely a trilogy at all) are the better books and stories here, in that order. The middle book, The Honourable Schoolboy (HS), is a dated and ridiculous story, told with head scratching comical exaggerations and a very typical 70’s movie ending: the protagonist is shot by the man, camera zooms out from a helicopter shot. I could not stop thinking that Le Carré had a big budget Hollywood movie script in mind while writing it, and if that is the case it would have been a flop. No one, thanks god, bothered to make the HS into a movie. The superb story of the bunch, and to my taste one of the best of the best of the spy thrillers and a diamond in the rough of British novels in general is undoubtably Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. It feels as if two different people wrote Tinker, etc. and the HS. Tinker, Taylor is so moody and contemplative and droll. An almost true to history exploration of topics beyond the fictional story. The swan song of the declining Britain of the mid twentieth century. The other is unadulterated mumbo jumbo, zooming over Hong Kong, Cambodia and Thailand in offensively off color racist characterizations and “humor”. Smiley’s People is a good sequel to the first and HS is a thin bridge explaining the character connections between the two. The anachronism of Smiley’s people is the quite deliberate jab at the pinkie Labour governments of the late 70s, who view the secret service as the ‘Tory viper in the nest.’ Brother Lacon (a civil servant) would be holding your tailcoats and reminding you not to be beastly to the Russians, etc.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Darrell Duthie

    Absolutely fabulous. Smiley's People was my first introduction to Le Carré and I still think it is one of his finest, followed by Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and the Honorourable Schoolboy. His descriptions of tradecraft, the dark, sometimes gloomy mood he manages to evoke through dialogue and setting, and the subtle, complex plot he weaves are masterful. The ability to transport the reader to widely varying places like London, Hamburg and Switzerland made the plot come alive in my mind. Smiley Absolutely fabulous. Smiley's People was my first introduction to Le Carré and I still think it is one of his finest, followed by Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and the Honorourable Schoolboy. His descriptions of tradecraft, the dark, sometimes gloomy mood he manages to evoke through dialogue and setting, and the subtle, complex plot he weaves are masterful. The ability to transport the reader to widely varying places like London, Hamburg and Switzerland made the plot come alive in my mind. Smiley himself is one of the most brilliant, yet wonderfully flawed characters in fiction, and it is precisely because of those flaws that he is so believable. The hard cold war game of espionage truly drips from these three books. If you were to read anything of Le Carré: read these.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    I read Tinker, Tailor a few years ago, so was just reading Honorable Schoolboy and Smiley’s People in this volume. I found the climax of the Honorable Schoolboy a little hard to follow, though the book has its moments. Smiley’s People is definitely the strongest in the series, both in its depictions of spycraft and in the character work.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Drivetime.Fm

    The character of Obi-Wan Kenobi was played by Sir Alec Guinness, who had a distinguished acting career, including a stint on TV as George Smiley in the serializations of the popular spy novels Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and Smiley’s People. What author created the character of George Smiley?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth

    The Karla Trilogy, all in one. A long read, but well worth it as it traces the heart of one of fiction's all time great heroes George Smiley in heavy action. The Karla Trilogy, all in one. A long read, but well worth it as it traces the heart of one of fiction's all time great heroes George Smiley in heavy action.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    Finished Smiley's People - earlier this Fall read the first 2 in the Karla Trilogy and reviewed under their names - Tinker, Tailor, etc. and The Honorable Schoolboy - liked them all very much. Finished Smiley's People - earlier this Fall read the first 2 in the Karla Trilogy and reviewed under their names - Tinker, Tailor, etc. and The Honorable Schoolboy - liked them all very much.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Clara

    It was worth it to read them one after the other. Doing so led me to appreciate his dance around Smiley, his antihero, his God.

  15. 5 out of 5

    R Moba

    Symphonic in construction and scope. Three movements, middle contrasting: Smiley, Not Smiley, Smiley. Europe, Asia, Europe. Maybe even: counter-espionage, espionage, counter-espionage. The middle is the most American, paralleling the fall of Saigon to British mis-adventure in Southeast Asia, but also contrasting the Cousins' strength against the Circus's weakness. Jerry turns out to be the ablest and weakest choice for that mission, and bears out why he was not really one of Smiley's chosen peop Symphonic in construction and scope. Three movements, middle contrasting: Smiley, Not Smiley, Smiley. Europe, Asia, Europe. Maybe even: counter-espionage, espionage, counter-espionage. The middle is the most American, paralleling the fall of Saigon to British mis-adventure in Southeast Asia, but also contrasting the Cousins' strength against the Circus's weakness. Jerry turns out to be the ablest and weakest choice for that mission, and bears out why he was not really one of Smiley's chosen people. TinkerTailor... includes Jim and Bill, both of whom were also not quite Smiley's people either, even though they counterpoint each other (as Smiley quotes Bill's schoolboy assessment of Jim). The last book is Smiley's people under the Maestro. Confiteor: I read this in three paperback volumes as it's more convenient for lying in bed.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Espen

    I just reread this collection of the three "Smiley" novels (in a Norwegian, which isn't quite the same thing, though the translator is good). The arena John le Carré creates here (or, rather, reports from, since he was a part of the real thing for a while) is the stealthy and paranoid world of Cold War espionage and counter-espionage, with the physically unimpressive spy-hunter George Smiley as the absent-minded and socially inept anti-hero. The three books follow each other, not unlike the three I just reread this collection of the three "Smiley" novels (in a Norwegian, which isn't quite the same thing, though the translator is good). The arena John le Carré creates here (or, rather, reports from, since he was a part of the real thing for a while) is the stealthy and paranoid world of Cold War espionage and counter-espionage, with the physically unimpressive spy-hunter George Smiley as the absent-minded and socially inept anti-hero. The three books follow each other, not unlike the three main parts of "The Lord of the Rings" (come to think of it, it shouldn's surprise me if le Carré structured it this way on purpose): The first book (Thinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy) concerns the hunt for a "mole" inside Circus, an thinly veiled version of MI6, defectors and all. The second has Smiley as a less central character, instead giving an operational agent named Jerry Westerby (the "Honourable Schoolboy) first billing, as he tries to locate and then secure an important Chinese defector. The third ("Smiley's People") concerns Smiley's attempt to penetrate the Soviet intelligence organization in a final battle with his nemesis, a the shady and very competent spymaster Karla. I like these books for their accurate depiction of the fear underlying much of the cold war, the way "little people" become pawns in a game they (and, many times not their bosses either) understand. Aside from the gloriously tragic figure of Jerry Westerby, the spy game is one of meticulous investigations, bureaucratic frustrations, occasional high hopes with correspondingly deep disappointments. How far can you go in order to win - can you sacrifice people, sometimes with their consent, for an uncertain victory in a cause you are no longer sure about? I think these three books are the best John le Carré wrote, with the possible exception of "The Little Drummer Girl". Reading them again brought back the haunting specter of the dictatorship next door, the nagging fear most people of my generation grew up with, the uncertain enemy with powerful weapons, fought by vicarious means with a realization that the individuals involved had very little to say in the big decisions. The question was - who, if anyone, had?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pa

    The plot surrounds the discovery of a double agent at the highest level of the British Intelligency agency but the novel goes, at great length and in great detail, to describe the social and physical life of British espionage agents and their day-to-day activities. As usual, Le Carre's hero, Mr. George Smiley, seems extraordinarily ordinary in an anti-James Bond kind of way: he's a pudgy, middle-aged, quiet, bespectacled Oxford man whose beautiful wife has just run off with one of his colleagues The plot surrounds the discovery of a double agent at the highest level of the British Intelligency agency but the novel goes, at great length and in great detail, to describe the social and physical life of British espionage agents and their day-to-day activities. As usual, Le Carre's hero, Mr. George Smiley, seems extraordinarily ordinary in an anti-James Bond kind of way: he's a pudgy, middle-aged, quiet, bespectacled Oxford man whose beautiful wife has just run off with one of his colleagues. Smiley's mission is to find out the "mole" -- a term for a double agent and have him destroyed. Unlike his previous novel, "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold" which offers a brilliant, suspenseful plot containing all the elements of duplicity, betrayal, and suspense that underline espionage work, "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" succeeds in showing its atmosphere rather its plot though the plot is definitely there. I just got lost so many times with so many characters and details -- too many details perhaps. I guess I read spy novels for the plot rather than for the atmosphere and for this reason the novel is somewhat a bore. It is true though that the scale and complexity of this novel are much greater than in "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold" which I absolutely enjoyed reading.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    It took me way longer than I expected to read all three of these classic spy novels by Le Carré. I read T,T,S,S last year, but ended up reading it again, just so I remembered the back story for the second and third novels. The good news is that these are great books, full of fascinating detail about the Cold War spy world. The characters, especially the secondary characters, are subtly drawn, but they're memorable for sure. Le Carré doesn't spend a lot of time on straight-up description, but eac It took me way longer than I expected to read all three of these classic spy novels by Le Carré. I read T,T,S,S last year, but ended up reading it again, just so I remembered the back story for the second and third novels. The good news is that these are great books, full of fascinating detail about the Cold War spy world. The characters, especially the secondary characters, are subtly drawn, but they're memorable for sure. Le Carré doesn't spend a lot of time on straight-up description, but each character grows more into herself/himself throughout the stories. The stories are great, but are pretty slow moving. If you're not prepared for the cerebral nature of these novels, you might be unpleasantly surprised. I think that their slow quality is reflective of what most Cold War spy work was: brain work and research. I hadn't expected it, and it took me several chapters to settle into the slow pacing of the stories. The first novel, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, tells the story of George Smiley, a retired member of the British MI-6 who is called back to investigate the possibility of a mole in the service. The second and third novels continue the story, as the uncovering of the mole only turned up more questions. I enjoyed these novels very much. Recommended if you like mysteries, British novels, cerebral novels, and spy stories.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Reuben Alcatraz

    An omnibus of three character driven and highly cerebral cold war spy novels starring George Smiley of British intelligence. I found George Smiley to be a pleasantly anti-heroic hero. He is old, dumpy, frequently cuckolded, and the closest he gets to an "action sequence" is pulling flashback-ridden all-nighters sifting through old MI6 case files to catch a soviet mole. The novels have a distinctly dim moral outlook. Essentially all personal relationships, be they friendship or marriage, seem to b An omnibus of three character driven and highly cerebral cold war spy novels starring George Smiley of British intelligence. I found George Smiley to be a pleasantly anti-heroic hero. He is old, dumpy, frequently cuckolded, and the closest he gets to an "action sequence" is pulling flashback-ridden all-nighters sifting through old MI6 case files to catch a soviet mole. The novels have a distinctly dim moral outlook. Essentially all personal relationships, be they friendship or marriage, seem to boil down to people using each other for some nebulously defined greater goal. Le Carre is very good at eking excitement out of paranoid office workers tracking double-agents through paper trails, then subverting that excitement with moral queasiness when that paper trail ends with a distant, violent, and ultimately senseless 'thump.' At 948 pages, this is A LOT. I will admit to skimming parts of the Honorable Schoolboy (the looong middle book concerning 70s Hong Kong Soviet-Sino banking intrigue). I read a lot of these books in a short time and felt like my soul's vision was wearing dark sunglasses. It is a testament to le Carre's skill as a writer that these action-less, sometimes boring, often depressing novels are so addictive.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Endre Barath

    In fairness to disclosure, I have almost every John le Carre's books. This one, I read when it came out and the impetus was to re-read it, since the movie is coming out soon and I had virtually no recollection of the story. Well I am glad I re-read it. This book is the first of a trilogy that le Carre' has written. ( I suspect had I not re-read the book I would have challenges following the movie) This is not a spoiler alert, because the story is simple, but you will be wondering who is the mole In fairness to disclosure, I have almost every John le Carre's books. This one, I read when it came out and the impetus was to re-read it, since the movie is coming out soon and I had virtually no recollection of the story. Well I am glad I re-read it. This book is the first of a trilogy that le Carre' has written. ( I suspect had I not re-read the book I would have challenges following the movie) This is not a spoiler alert, because the story is simple, but you will be wondering who is the mole or double agent in the book during the entire time. To me Le Carre’ book brings back memories of Guy Burgess and Kim Philby (double agents & moles of the British Secret Service) the quest to find the mole, the double agent. That is the mission of George Smiley the anti James Bond of the British Secret Service. He is not the glamorous, nor is he the sexy male spy that women dream about. He is the overweight and an out of shape middle aged man, for whom you would not turn around twice if he walked by you.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    The Complete Smiley - The Karla Trilogy- Book 2: The Honourable Schoolboy - Part 1 Hide information Dramatisation of John le Carre's classic novel featuring intelligence officer George Smiley. Set against the backdrop of the war in Indochina in 1975, spymaster George Smiley uncovers a trail of Russian money leading to a prominent Hong Kong citizen. But what is the money for? George Smiley ...... Simon Russell Beale Jerry Westerby ...... Hugh Bonneville Peter Guillam ...... Richard Dillane Connie Sach The Complete Smiley - The Karla Trilogy- Book 2: The Honourable Schoolboy - Part 1 Hide information Dramatisation of John le Carre's classic novel featuring intelligence officer George Smiley. Set against the backdrop of the war in Indochina in 1975, spymaster George Smiley uncovers a trail of Russian money leading to a prominent Hong Kong citizen. But what is the money for? George Smiley ...... Simon Russell Beale Jerry Westerby ...... Hugh Bonneville Peter Guillam ...... Richard Dillane Connie Sachs ...... Maggie Steed Doc De Salis ...... Bruce Alexander Sam Collins ...... Nicholas Boulton Oliver Lacon ...... Anthony Calf Enderby ...... James Laurenson Craw ...... Philip Quast Ann Smiley ...... Anna Chancellor The Girl, Phoebe ...... Tessa Nicholson Stubbs/Wilbrahim ...... Nigel Hastings Frost ...... Piers Wehner Drake Ko ...... David Yip Tiu ...... Paul Courtenay Hyu Directed by Marc Beeby

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steve Burch

    These three novels are perhaps the closest we have to Dickens. The cast of characters is enormous and every character, from the major players to those who have maybe one scene, are both complex and memorable. LeCarre's themes of the various levels of betrayal are handled with surety and wit. Smiley may be one the greatest characters of the twentieth century, to misquote Chesterton on another fictional figure Smiley is the very bloodhound of heaven. and for those who care the two filmed adaptatio These three novels are perhaps the closest we have to Dickens. The cast of characters is enormous and every character, from the major players to those who have maybe one scene, are both complex and memorable. LeCarre's themes of the various levels of betrayal are handled with surety and wit. Smiley may be one the greatest characters of the twentieth century, to misquote Chesterton on another fictional figure Smiley is the very bloodhound of heaven. and for those who care the two filmed adaptations of the first novel Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, with Alec Guinness and Gary Oldman, are superbly written, directed, and in the lead performances, master classes in the art of acting.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Betta

    This omnibus as a whole was a slow read for me, but that is probably mostly due to The Honourable Schoolboy, which seemed a bit ponderous. Both Tinker Tailor... and Smiley's People were tight and economically told, but "Schoolboy" seemed more like an adventure tale without a true center. I did enjoy the scenes especially of the bitter end of the Vietnam War as told from the ground (and in the air). Jerry Westerby is kind of a throwback "hero" of sorts, and George Smiley (and Karla for that matte This omnibus as a whole was a slow read for me, but that is probably mostly due to The Honourable Schoolboy, which seemed a bit ponderous. Both Tinker Tailor... and Smiley's People were tight and economically told, but "Schoolboy" seemed more like an adventure tale without a true center. I did enjoy the scenes especially of the bitter end of the Vietnam War as told from the ground (and in the air). Jerry Westerby is kind of a throwback "hero" of sorts, and George Smiley (and Karla for that matter) seem to take a backseat to the wanderings and woes of Westerby. I did enjoy it but found it less compelling and tight than the bracketing novels in the "trilogy."

  24. 5 out of 5

    Frank Pinelander

    The reason I read this series, was after an 18F associate, in dialogue with someone associated with Anonymous, was asked questions who's answers were NOFORN. The recommendation to "Maxim" was to read this series, not for the storyline, but what was between the lines of the story itself. The stories themselves I found mediocre, but the details about Tradecraft are somewhat shocking, especially given the era in which the books were written. But then, that part of it would've gone way over most peopl The reason I read this series, was after an 18F associate, in dialogue with someone associated with Anonymous, was asked questions who's answers were NOFORN. The recommendation to "Maxim" was to read this series, not for the storyline, but what was between the lines of the story itself. The stories themselves I found mediocre, but the details about Tradecraft are somewhat shocking, especially given the era in which the books were written. But then, that part of it would've gone way over most peoples heads anyway.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Russell

    "The Quest for Karla" is three of John le Carré's novels collected into one volume, "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy", "The Honourable Schoolboy", and "Smiley's People." I admit I found the first volume slow going, as he introduces lots of spy agency jargon with no explanation, but the plot and descriptiveness of the prose kept me at it. By the third volume, I was okay with the technical terms, and found that by far the most enjoyable of the three. I might have made a mistake tackling these before "The Quest for Karla" is three of John le Carré's novels collected into one volume, "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy", "The Honourable Schoolboy", and "Smiley's People." I admit I found the first volume slow going, as he introduces lots of spy agency jargon with no explanation, but the plot and descriptiveness of the prose kept me at it. By the third volume, I was okay with the technical terms, and found that by far the most enjoyable of the three. I might have made a mistake tackling these before "The Spy Who Came in from the Cold", an earlier novel, but I'll try that one later.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Allison Sandve

    The masterpiece of the Cold War. There's not much I can say about the Karla Trilogy that hasn't been said before. One interesting note: When the original "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" was being cast -- with Alec Guinness as George Smiley -- the interest among actors was huge. I've read that the casting of TTSS wreaked havoc on the theater scene of London's West End. All the good actors wanted to be in TTSS. They were. The masterpiece of the Cold War. There's not much I can say about the Karla Trilogy that hasn't been said before. One interesting note: When the original "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" was being cast -- with Alec Guinness as George Smiley -- the interest among actors was huge. I've read that the casting of TTSS wreaked havoc on the theater scene of London's West End. All the good actors wanted to be in TTSS. They were.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    A well written Anthology of classic spy novels. Reading some earlier reviews I can't sign up witht he general opinion that Smiley's peaple is the let down in the series. I personally find the Honorable Schoolboy rather tiresome, while I enjoyed Smiley's people a lot more. In my opinion the Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and Smiley's peaople are excellent books well in LeCarre's other excellent Smiley Novel A Death of Quality. A well written Anthology of classic spy novels. Reading some earlier reviews I can't sign up witht he general opinion that Smiley's peaple is the let down in the series. I personally find the Honorable Schoolboy rather tiresome, while I enjoyed Smiley's people a lot more. In my opinion the Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and Smiley's peaople are excellent books well in LeCarre's other excellent Smiley Novel A Death of Quality.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cormac Farrell

    This is the definitive Cold War espionage masterpiece. There is no glamour, no money no beautiful girls. The backdrop is bleak, the murky intentions of the agents even bleaker. Behind it all I would argue that Smiley is the most perfectly drawn character in modern English literature. The quality of the plotting, the realism of the characters, and the accuracy of the trade craft elevate this collection to the very pinnacle of the genre. Work of art.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mary Mcknight

    I read all these books several times nearly 20 years ago. Lately, I've been missing Smiley and thought I would visit him again. So far, it's even better than the first couple of times! 4/15 Plowing through The Honorable Schoolboy. Makes much more sense this time around. Am enjoying it, but prefer Tinker Tailor. I read all these books several times nearly 20 years ago. Lately, I've been missing Smiley and thought I would visit him again. So far, it's even better than the first couple of times! 4/15 Plowing through The Honorable Schoolboy. Makes much more sense this time around. Am enjoying it, but prefer Tinker Tailor.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Ok, I did not finish this book. I plodded through it and put it down. I didn't like the main characters, and the ones that I got into, were taken away. I was reading it on a kindle and was busy so I kept putting it down which made it even harder to stick with. I think it had to be 'me' not the book, and maybe we just weren't compatible. Ok, I did not finish this book. I plodded through it and put it down. I didn't like the main characters, and the ones that I got into, were taken away. I was reading it on a kindle and was busy so I kept putting it down which made it even harder to stick with. I think it had to be 'me' not the book, and maybe we just weren't compatible.

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