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Lucifer, Vol. 4: The Divine Comedy

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With the original gate between the two worlds shattered into a million separate gates, beings from all of the worlds in the old Creation now have the opportunity to join Lucifer's recently opened existence. While neither Heaven nor Hell await them there, the forces aligned against the Lightbringer still have a card or two left to play.and their attitude towards Lucifer's n With the original gate between the two worlds shattered into a million separate gates, beings from all of the worlds in the old Creation now have the opportunity to join Lucifer's recently opened existence. While neither Heaven nor Hell await them there, the forces aligned against the Lightbringer still have a card or two left to play.and their attitude towards Lucifer's new subjects is a far cry from charitable! This volume contains: Lucifer #21–28


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With the original gate between the two worlds shattered into a million separate gates, beings from all of the worlds in the old Creation now have the opportunity to join Lucifer's recently opened existence. While neither Heaven nor Hell await them there, the forces aligned against the Lightbringer still have a card or two left to play.and their attitude towards Lucifer's n With the original gate between the two worlds shattered into a million separate gates, beings from all of the worlds in the old Creation now have the opportunity to join Lucifer's recently opened existence. While neither Heaven nor Hell await them there, the forces aligned against the Lightbringer still have a card or two left to play.and their attitude towards Lucifer's new subjects is a far cry from charitable! This volume contains: Lucifer #21–28

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 4: The Divine Comedy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    All the threads laid so far come back to roost in this volume. I love that Lucifer's pride continues to be his Achilles' heel. Carey does such a fantastic job weaving in and out supporting characters and then using them to launch the story off in new directions. Guadium has quickly become my new favorite character.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    "This volume has some of my favorite issues and my favorite quotes in the whole series," I say about literally every single volume. But the point still stands, I absolutely love this volume! And it has much better 'side stories' than the last one [the issue with the centaur girl is one of my favorites and then the one w/ Spera and Gaudium is a nice fun addition] and also CAMEO BY DEATH! I absolutely love the cover to issue 25. Anyway, I just love the whole thing with the Basanos because it's bas "This volume has some of my favorite issues and my favorite quotes in the whole series," I say about literally every single volume. But the point still stands, I absolutely love this volume! And it has much better 'side stories' than the last one [the issue with the centaur girl is one of my favorites and then the one w/ Spera and Gaudium is a nice fun addition] and also CAMEO BY DEATH! I absolutely love the cover to issue 25. Anyway, I just love the whole thing with the Basanos because it's basically just like ...Lucifer creating problems for himself [and you know, more reinforcement that his sin definitely is pride]. I just find it very interesting that he made time run much faster in his universe - presumably so that it could 'catch up' to God's universe and make the two more easily comparable - and it really screwed him over in two major ways 1. he was outside the universe when the Basanos attacked and couldn't get back in time even though he was literally standing NEXT TO the gate on the other side and 2. the centaur girl tried to warn him beforehand but after realizing that her entire life was a few minutes to him she got fed up and destroyed her message. And there's a line that she says that I love which is "how centuries and men must seem like mayflies to him" because again that's specific language that has been used to describe God before and it's just very interesting to see Lucifer set himself up to BE God and then slowly realize that's not exactly what he wanted or maybe not as 'easy' as he thought it would be. This whole series is honestly just amazing and has so much depth. I love it. Mentions of will in this volume: [this one is about Elaine, but there are a lot of comparisons between her and Lucifer coming up so I included it] And some other things: One of my favorite quotes A page which talks about the problem w/ the gate and time that I talked about earlier. And the part with the centaur girl comparing Lucifer to God. Just love this cover! Lucifer in a nutshell Death showing up to lay down some truth lol I just find this funny And then of course he's gotta be like that Absolutely love Mazikeen in this one. It's great how she got exactly what she wanted out of the situation and Lucifer is just like 'FINE!'

  3. 4 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    Every page and panel used to either further the story or to draw you in. It almost feels bureaucratic, the rules and loopholes and mazes you could weave through to get your way in all realities. Elaine is such a lovely character. She has so much spunk and she's so fierce, but like any kid (even Yahweh's granddaughter) she's naive and acts impulsive. Death comes by and takes a life. The fallen cherubs bring much needed comic relief without it feeling corny.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Airiz

    This series just keeps getting better. SPOILERS ABOUND! The Divine Comedy tome finds our favorite antihero putting his finishing touches to his magnum opus: a new universe that is outside God’s authority, spun from the “big bang” of archangel Michael Demiurgos’s death and rebirth. Shortly after the seventh day of Creation, the Basanos infiltrate and wreak havoc in the said cosmos, and Lucifer arrives a tad too late to save his masterpiece. Elsewhere, it seems like almost all creatures in all imag This series just keeps getting better. SPOILERS ABOUND! The Divine Comedy tome finds our favorite antihero putting his finishing touches to his magnum opus: a new universe that is outside God’s authority, spun from the “big bang” of archangel Michael Demiurgos’s death and rebirth. Shortly after the seventh day of Creation, the Basanos infiltrate and wreak havoc in the said cosmos, and Lucifer arrives a tad too late to save his masterpiece. Elsewhere, it seems like almost all creatures in all imaginable planes, friends or otherwise, are keen on seeing the Lightbringer’s ultimate demise. Despite--or perhaps because of--her love for Lucifer, Mazikeen wages a war against him after he turns down the Lilim’s offer of becoming his army (hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, indeed); in the Japanese Afterlife, the Queen Izanami’s vengeful scheme is being put into action; and in the Silver City, a blasphemy is born in the heart of one of Yahweh’s favorite angels…I wonder, could this spark an encore rebellion? The excitement is almost killing me. I loved this volume to bits because it reveals so much about Lucifer without actually stripping him off of his clandestine aura. In the previous issues he is shown as a quasi-perfect creature whose unsurpassed weapons are his strong will and razor-sharp wit. Here we are shown that like anybody else, Lucifer’s got a waterloo too. The story is a labyrinth of literary twists and turns, with action charging along at a speed that will keep the readers on the edge of their seats. I’m quite satisfied with the reappearance of old characters and the important roles they play to the story arcs. Elaine Belloc, Michael Demiurgos’ teenaged angel daughter, has indeed grown fond of Lucifer that he is the first to come to mind when she is in danger; Meleos, creator of the Basanos, is back to take revenge on the Devil; and Cestis of the Dancing Flesh is out on an assassination mission with her bull’s eye on Elaine’s back. There are new characters as well that are not hard to love, like Gaudium, a fallen cherub who protects Elaine, and the sorceress-centaur Esa-Kira, a harbinger whose fickleness may have contributed in the Lucifer’s downfall… Oh, and Death of the Endless from The Sandman graphic novels has a cameo. I think that deserves a special mention. Carey is a genius, I might say, for crafting a masterpiece this good. The plot is intricately executed and is hinting that succeeding issues will contain bombs of epiphanies. Action-packed scenes, poignant events, and humurous parts are juggled nimbly. I also commend the writing, both the strong dialogues and the fragments of narration strewn across the volume that have shades of stylish poetry in them. Perhaps I have some gripe about the art, but I guess it’s also getting better compared to the previous volumes… That said, I think this is one of the best in the series. Thumb up!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Kaufmann

    My reviews LUCIFER are just becoming embarrassing love letters to the genius of Mike Carey at this point, so I'll just say that even four volumes in the series continues to surprise and amaze me. Truly excellent stuff.

  6. 5 out of 5

    sally ✿

    seeing my fav, death, was an absolute delight :') (just realized how weird this sounds out of context, oh well)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Štěpán

    Damn, that was some nice fire.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Zec

    Contains the arcs: Paradiso, Writing on the Wall, Purgatorio, Breaking and Entering. Another fantastic series of arcs. Really enjoying the format of this series as compared to The Sandman. Very TV like in the sense that most issues are standalone but all contribute to a larger arc. Biggest difference between Lucifer and Sandman is that since all the stories are connected and build upon each other, even filler one-shot issues are still important. Really intrigued by Michael’s debate, kid and fate. Contains the arcs: Paradiso, Writing on the Wall, Purgatorio, Breaking and Entering. Another fantastic series of arcs. Really enjoying the format of this series as compared to The Sandman. Very TV like in the sense that most issues are standalone but all contribute to a larger arc. Biggest difference between Lucifer and Sandman is that since all the stories are connected and build upon each other, even filler one-shot issues are still important. Really intrigued by Michael’s debate, kid and fate. Interesting that Mazikeen goes though quite a lot and kinda ends up in the same place. I feel slightly sorry for Jill and a little disappointed in her character. It seemed like she could have done a lot with her powers and I was really looking forward to see if she could have any sort of relationship with the Basanos. But I guess that the point of her character is mostly a victim/vessel of the Basanos. Semi-interesting parallels with the 27-club and other celebrity conspiracy stuff but not particularly spellbinding. Of all the characters thus far, she is the one who feels most like a plot-device rather than a character. I like the newly introduced Gaudium, a fallen ceraphim seeking redemption by doing Michael’s bidding. The final issue of this book, featuring Gaudium and his Sister, was fun, entertaining and had some good world-building. I really like how the events that were set in motion in the first issue of the series come to a climax here. The biggest quality of the series so far is its meticulous plotting.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Siria

    I was predisposed to like this from the title alone, since my Dante geekiness is pure and true. I really wasn't disappointed. The breadth and inventiveness and scope of this title just awes me. Reading it evokes the same sensation I get when I'm deep in the Commedia - of glimpsing a huge framework that is partly comprehensible and partly divine and partly ineffable and partly just really bloody confusing. There is the same slow sense of discovery about the whole thing as well, of peeling back la I was predisposed to like this from the title alone, since my Dante geekiness is pure and true. I really wasn't disappointed. The breadth and inventiveness and scope of this title just awes me. Reading it evokes the same sensation I get when I'm deep in the Commedia - of glimpsing a huge framework that is partly comprehensible and partly divine and partly ineffable and partly just really bloody confusing. There is the same slow sense of discovery about the whole thing as well, of peeling back layers to see more and more of what is going on. There are some things that Lucifer knows, and some things that he is only finding out for himself, and some things that can only come as revelation to him. In many ways, the progression of this pings many of the same things that hit me when I read about Dante climbing down through the Inferno and up the mount of Purgatory. More than that, there are a number of aspects of this work that chime in so absolutely with a number of the ways I think about religion, and a number of the ways in which it intrigues me/irks me/has made really, really sure that I haven't classed myself as a Catholic in a long, long time. Those are issues that are probably going to find themselves expressed in a long, wanktastic post on Lucifer, theology, and possibly the Comedy itself once of these days. Feel afraid. *g*

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    The problem with creating a realm outside of God's rule is that every creature on the wrong side of divinity wants a piece of it - or, in the case of the Basanos, wants all of it. In the fourth volume of Carey's excellent series, Lucifer is forced to defend against all comers. Being Lucifer, he's offended a few people along the way, a few of whom - Izanami and the Lilim among them - find this battle to be an excellent time to even old scores. To survive, even the Devil might need a little help. C The problem with creating a realm outside of God's rule is that every creature on the wrong side of divinity wants a piece of it - or, in the case of the Basanos, wants all of it. In the fourth volume of Carey's excellent series, Lucifer is forced to defend against all comers. Being Lucifer, he's offended a few people along the way, a few of whom - Izanami and the Lilim among them - find this battle to be an excellent time to even old scores. To survive, even the Devil might need a little help. Carey neatly knocks the pins out from beneath Lucifer's vaunted self-sufficiency without humbling him in the slightest, and I can't wait to see how the burden of debts owed weighs on his wings. As an added bonus on top of the actual and emotional carnage, the author also gives us a note-perfect cameo from Death of the Endless, who really should get her own book one of these days. Though The Divine Comedy serves as something of a setback for the Fallen One, it's clear his fight with Heaven is far from over. Thank Carey we'll have ringside seats for the slugfest.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert Beveridge

    Mike Carey, Lucifer: The Divine Comedy (Vertigo, 2003) I'd thought the third volume wrapped up a story arc or two. I was wrong. Carey had more up his sleeve here as Lucifer, the Lilim, the Basanos, and Elaine Belloc all converge on Lucifer's alternate universe for a big, nasty struggle in which Lucifer finds himself help from a few places he didn't realize it was coming, the Basanos try to take over the world (so what else is new?), and the Lilim keep whining. Meanwhile, Michael may be back in He Mike Carey, Lucifer: The Divine Comedy (Vertigo, 2003) I'd thought the third volume wrapped up a story arc or two. I was wrong. Carey had more up his sleeve here as Lucifer, the Lilim, the Basanos, and Elaine Belloc all converge on Lucifer's alternate universe for a big, nasty struggle in which Lucifer finds himself help from a few places he didn't realize it was coming, the Basanos try to take over the world (so what else is new?), and the Lilim keep whining. Meanwhile, Michael may be back in Heaven, but it seems he learned some things down on Earth that don't have his boss all that pleased... once again, Carey takes the legacy of Neil Gaiman, runs with it, and comes up with a winner. Fantastic stuff, this. ****

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    By far the best yet in this series. I loved every little thing about this volume and I am so happy I've stuck with this series. The characters are finally fleshed out and the story groundwork from the previous volumes culminates in many interesting and exciting ways. The writing is top notch.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    So I take back what I said from the first trade paperback about Innocence from the Basanos being one of my favorite characters. Apparently she's not just "bad ass" she's a bit genocide-y. I really liked the fallen cherub Gaudium (A.K.A. "Joy"), he is hilarious. The whole plot device of the feathers Izanami had woven into Lucifer's wings was lame and poorly explained. I really liked Esa-Kira the centaur, and loved her story--this was my favorite part of this trade. This was illustrated by Dean Ormst So I take back what I said from the first trade paperback about Innocence from the Basanos being one of my favorite characters. Apparently she's not just "bad ass" she's a bit genocide-y. I really liked the fallen cherub Gaudium (A.K.A. "Joy"), he is hilarious. The whole plot device of the feathers Izanami had woven into Lucifer's wings was lame and poorly explained. I really liked Esa-Kira the centaur, and loved her story--this was my favorite part of this trade. This was illustrated by Dean Ormston, but it didn't bug me. None of the other parts he illustrated in this trade bugged me either, maybe the aspects of his style I don't like aren't as striking in his later work? The main focus of this trade was the Basanos destroying Lucifer's creation, and I felt meh about it. It also ended anti-climactically. It was cool to see a cameo from Death of The Endless, I hope there is more of her and the other Endless in future issues of Lucifer. I wonder if anything will come of Michael's blasphemy. It would make for an interesting story to see heaven's goody two-shoes turn against the Host. We'll see...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I've been dipping back in to old Lucifer stories because of the television show, different though it might be. I felt the need to see Mazikeen with an army on Lucifer's doorstep, even as he lies burned and broken. I had forgotten all about Elaine's story line in this book, which is remarkably well framed, but then Death has always been one of my favorite characters in this universe. A fun, epic series that manages to have compelling characters even though it's full of angels, this book is a good I've been dipping back in to old Lucifer stories because of the television show, different though it might be. I felt the need to see Mazikeen with an army on Lucifer's doorstep, even as he lies burned and broken. I had forgotten all about Elaine's story line in this book, which is remarkably well framed, but then Death has always been one of my favorite characters in this universe. A fun, epic series that manages to have compelling characters even though it's full of angels, this book is a good go-to work for fantasy fans. I'd recommend it to anyone who enjoys comics and the occasional mythic work.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Catalano

    Why is everyone always trying to help Lucifer when he is such a dick? I thought the whole point of the series is trying to make the character of the devil more sympathetic, but as of lately he’s just an asshole. Maybe not evil, just a typical ass. I really wish Goodreads had a 0 to 10 rating system instead is just 1 to 5. It’s extremely difficult to discern how I feel about this. The fantasy elements are very good, but I don’t know. Something feels off.

  16. 5 out of 5

    SaraKat

    Fourth in the Lucifer series. We continue the war between heaven and Lucifer over the new creation. I enjoy this series due to the clever writing, intricate art, and well-woven plots. It seems random at times, until we see how the bit ties in with the larger story much later.

  17. 4 out of 5

    sammy

    with every volume i fall more and more in love with this series! the only qualm i had with this one is that there was a Lot going on. maybe i’m just dumb, but especially in the beginning, the scene switches were kind of Rough and things were hard to keep track of. it wrapped up beautifully though.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Keeloca

    Actual score: 4,5 See, the thing that these books really have going for them, other than a kick-ass protagonist and compelling stories, are the excellent cast of very good side-characters, that are often allowed to take center stage. Often these are women (or female, at least) and I love it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steven Werber

    This may be my favorite series!! On to the next....

  20. 4 out of 5

    James

    Allegiances change and Lucifer makes a come back but at a great cost.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kit

    That there Mike Carey sure can spin him a yarn. Also, Death shows up. Good times.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

    Didn't start reading, just put read to remove from my to read shelf, Want to read the first 3 volumes first.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sonja

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Unfortunately, again, I cannot remark at length about the text and must limit myself to highlights only. Lucifer as Anti-hero, Lucifer as Character This text introduced an interesting juxtaposition of Lucifer. First, it begins with Lucifer revealing himself to the citizens of his newly populated world. He towers above them, a figure of strength, and a taker of no bullshit. His first command is the forbidden commandment of worship. This is, inherently, an image of strength. Lucifer is beautiful in his Unfortunately, again, I cannot remark at length about the text and must limit myself to highlights only. Lucifer as Anti-hero, Lucifer as Character This text introduced an interesting juxtaposition of Lucifer. First, it begins with Lucifer revealing himself to the citizens of his newly populated world. He towers above them, a figure of strength, and a taker of no bullshit. His first command is the forbidden commandment of worship. This is, inherently, an image of strength. Lucifer is beautiful in his rebellion, in his absolute self assuredness, in his confidence, and, most importantly, in himself. However, as the draws towards its end, that strength is undercut with a newly revealed aspect of his character. It's not when he falls when the Cards attempt to establish themselves as gods in his universe. It's not when he falls prey to a magical attack from behind (a plot point simmering since volume 2), it's not even when he goes forward into hell to face the angel completely powerless (which is, ironically, an image of strength in and of itself). It's when he converses with Death that he reveals the fragility of his character, of his inexorable will. He does not accept death, he flings himself against her in anger and denial - and she coolly, confidently gives him a piece of her mind and advice while she's at it. The differences between their manners is staggering -- and it adds more depth to an already complex character. I think that's one of the reasons I love this image so much: It encapsulates the very nature of their conversation. And it is beautiful. As for the anti-hero - Lucifer knows how Elaine adores him. How she loves him. How she'd do anything, absolutely anything. How young she is. And he does not warn her that in giving life to him, she will sacrifice it for herself. That moment is so poignantly sad. I love how Carey isn't afraid to make it absolutely real. Lucifer, Michael, and Yahweh I liked how Lucifer and Michael became two sides of the same coin essentially. Lucifer is full of this inexorable will, Michael full of creative power. Without them both, the new universe would never have come to be. They are, in a way, a circle, incomplete without the other. And this is seen even more clearly in Michael's fall. I'm eager to see how volumes 5 and onwards will explore this circle that's sort of coming into light. And, of course, I could be misreading it, but I hope I'm not. I love how offended Lucifer was when Death compared him to Yahweh -- even as he conveniently ignores all their other similarities: creation (the big bang encore), a first people, appearing on high and delivering a commandment - simply differing on the nature of the commandment. It's interesting that in this and other literature about the devil, folks have always commented on Lucifer's pride, the pride that eventually lead to his downfall. Yet, he commands people not to worship anybody -- not even him. And, on the contrary, the god of the Bible is a jealous god, demanding the sole worship of himself. It's just interesting, the juxtaposition of the two characters in parallel with each other. I also liked the subtle (and not so subtle) commentary on religion. Lucifer's world was perfectly happy and content without religion -- they were beautiful and intelligent, so much so that Rachel slips into that universe with wonder and amazement. This world - torn apart by war and there are still nations living impoverished and uneducated. And it's only when the Cards come claiming to be gods that true, national disaster strikes. My atheist heart thrilled.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    The Divine Comedy is one of my favorite volumes in the series, and a good jumping-in point for new readers. Beginning with a brief and very effective “the story so far” in the form of a conversation (of sorts) between Michael and God, this collection quickly establishes itself as one of the key storylines in the series, and serves as both the climax and conclusion of Lucifer’s first overarching story—and as a warning of Michael’s fate. There are so many things that happen here, and all of them ar The Divine Comedy is one of my favorite volumes in the series, and a good jumping-in point for new readers. Beginning with a brief and very effective “the story so far” in the form of a conversation (of sorts) between Michael and God, this collection quickly establishes itself as one of the key storylines in the series, and serves as both the climax and conclusion of Lucifer’s first overarching story—and as a warning of Michael’s fate. There are so many things that happen here, and all of them are important in terms of end-game progression, and there is so much going on that even the interlude issues don’t really give the reader a chance to rest. Lucifer Morningstar, former archangel, former lord of Hell, current supreme being of his own cosmos, has accumulated too many enemies...so many that not even his cunning and considerable will can save him when varying forces converge to lay claim to his creation. The Basanos, having been lying dormant in Jill Presto since the events that destroyed Lux, manifests itself with a vengeance, hell-bent on destroying Lucifer once and for all, claiming his creation, and reproducing. The Lilim, also seeking a realm of their own, declare war against Lucifer when he refuses to grant them a world of their own. Led by Lucifer’s once-faithful servant, Mazikeen, they move against him as well. Suzano –O-No-Mikoto from “The House of Windowless Rooms” finally puts his own plans into motion, relying on the treacherous feathers inserted into Lucifer’s wings during his visit to reclaim them. And, as the Basanos wage war on his creation, the Lilim converge to do the same, and Suzano arrives seeking retribution, the Morningstar falls into the realm of a certain pale, perky, ankh-wearing member of the Endless. All that, and we’ve only reached the halfway point of the story. With The Divine Comedy, Carey brings his A-game, crafting a masterful arc that combines religion, myth and good old-fashioned storytelling in the kind of volume that makes me wonder why it is that only super-heroes get all the movie and TV adaptations. Lucifer is storytelling on an epic scale, flawlessly constructed, and with this installment Carey and company rival, and perhaps even eclipse, its parent series The Sandman . The artistic team of Gross, Kelly and Ormston continue to wonderfully complement and enhance Carey’s storytelling, blending the fantastical, the horrific, and those quiet, human moments that tug at the heartstrings. This was the collection that made Lucifer one of my must-read series, and the one I loan out to people when they gape and wonder how anyone could ever read a comic book about the Devil (living in the rural American south when these issues were originally published, that was a lot of wondering). It is fantastic, beautiful, and still resonates after all these years.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    The Divine Comedy is made up of two exceptionally climatic arc 'Paradiso' and 'Purgatorio' with two short accompanying stories 'The Writing on the Wall' which separates the two major arcs and 'Breaking and Entering' which concludes the collection. By the end of the third volume, A Dalliance with the damned it felt like Lucifer had everything very much in hand and with everything looking nicely tidied up in anticipation of the next big conflict. The stories that make up this collection show just The Divine Comedy is made up of two exceptionally climatic arc 'Paradiso' and 'Purgatorio' with two short accompanying stories 'The Writing on the Wall' which separates the two major arcs and 'Breaking and Entering' which concludes the collection. By the end of the third volume, A Dalliance with the damned it felt like Lucifer had everything very much in hand and with everything looking nicely tidied up in anticipation of the next big conflict. The stories that make up this collection show just how wrong such appearances can be. In 'Paradiso' and 'Purgatorio' cosmically grand conflict comes to Lucifer's new creation as the Basanos (with their host Jill Presto in tow) make their move, showing themselves to be even more cruel and calculating than Lucifer through their actions and cunning use of other enemies intentions. it is conflict all around as the Lilim under Mazikeen's leadership also decide to make their move, in the Silver City Michael grapples with his own inner turmoil and Elaine has more than enough trouble her own troubles but still finds to get embroiled in Lucifer's cosmic struggle. The two one-off stories that feature are both great interludes. 'The Writing on the Wall' is a fantastic tale of the life of a centaur in the new creation and is an informing diversion about how 'regular' life goes on around and throughout the grand story arcs of the series. It also offers some insight in to how the denizens of this new creation conceive of Lucifer as a non-deified creator. Meanwhile 'Breaking and Entering' cement Gaudium and his sister Spera new additions to the the continuing cast. A comic fool to operate as foil against Lucifer's tragic persona. This collection was great and showed that the series isn't afraid to make bold moves, and respond to those with equal bold moves. The unexpected also featured here, everything seemed well in hand and yet it all fell apart only to be put right again. One thing is for sure, every small action and statement matters in what is turning out to be a precise and well maintained series. No detail can be afforded to be overlooked. The repercussions of the conflict will no doubt be felt through the stories that follow.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ross

    The premise is excellent. What would happen if Lucifer were given control of his own, Eden-like dimension? However, the Lucifer of this graphic novel is not the Devil we know-neither is he the Arch-fiend from "Paradise Lost". This is Mike Carey's "Lucifer" based on a character "created" by Neil Gaiman. Carey's Lucifer is more like a one-time despot in self-imposed exile, brooding on the future. He believes himself to be All-Powerful, so it goes without saying that he doesn't need help from anybody The premise is excellent. What would happen if Lucifer were given control of his own, Eden-like dimension? However, the Lucifer of this graphic novel is not the Devil we know-neither is he the Arch-fiend from "Paradise Lost". This is Mike Carey's "Lucifer" based on a character "created" by Neil Gaiman. Carey's Lucifer is more like a one-time despot in self-imposed exile, brooding on the future. He believes himself to be All-Powerful, so it goes without saying that he doesn't need help from anybody. The Basanos, who are the "villians" of this piece, are nowhere near as powerful, but they are able to exploit Lucifer's weaknesses. What are these weaknesses? Pride, certainly (that goes without saying) Then there's Lucifer's natural ability to piss off anyone who wants to help him. Beyond this, there's the fact that THIS Lucifer seems to make all his decisions out of a sense of insecurity, and paranoia. Chief among these decisions is that none of the newly-arrived settlers to Lucifer's dimension are allowed to practice god-worship of any kind-not even for the Lightbringer, who they nevertheless describe as "the Maker" As part of a further revenge plot against "the Maker", one of the characters attempts to gain control over Lord Lucifer by making Lucifer obligated to him. That Lucifer would feel an obligation to anybody strikes me as naive. But this Fallen Angel apparently does seem to follow some kind of honor code, even when the others around him do not. Nevertheless, that so many of Lucifer's followers, in the novel, are willing to stand by him is testimony to "the Maker's" charisma, and the almost superstitious power he has over his newly adopted "children". In the end, Lucifer puts pride aside, and remembers to be there for his friends. One last note : whatever you think of the execution, this is epic comic story telling. It even includes Death. And, as it only covers Paradise and Purgatory, (working in descending order) this "Divine Comedy" leaves room for a sequel.

  27. 4 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    Can an angel die? Is it possible for the Lightbringer to be killed? After making it clear to everyone, that "the strong one is most powerful alone" Lucifer is finally reaping the fruits of his arrogance in the "Paradiso" and "Purgatorio" story arcs. When he only survives by the skin of his teeth he finds himself indebted to some characters that he used to treat pretty much like cockroaches in previous encounters. From the previous issues, we already know that Lucifer has already created his own r Can an angel die? Is it possible for the Lightbringer to be killed? After making it clear to everyone, that "the strong one is most powerful alone" Lucifer is finally reaping the fruits of his arrogance in the "Paradiso" and "Purgatorio" story arcs. When he only survives by the skin of his teeth he finds himself indebted to some characters that he used to treat pretty much like cockroaches in previous encounters. From the previous issues, we already know that Lucifer has already created his own realm and universe to have a place where his beliefs about life and the afterlife could be realized. He's populating his land with lost souls, and anyone who settles in his land is free to live as he or she chooses, his only mandate that they must worship no one. The forces of Heaven view Lucifer's universe as an atrocity against God and insist the domain must be closed at any and all costs. Meanwhile, the Archangel Michael finds himself torn between his service to God and his service to his brother Lucifer. Lucifer's new land isn't as "heavenly" like the Silver City as he may envision it, though, and several non-heavenly forces are at work against him. The Basanos, a tribe of horrifically evil spirits derived from a deck of tarot cards have planted their seed in a woman and plan to use their offspring for their own diabolical needs. Of particular note here is the great short story "The Writing On the Wall" which tells of a mission of a sorcerer to warn her maker, Lucifer, of his impending doom in the hands of the Basanos. Book Details: Title Lucifer Vol. 4: The Divine Comedy Author Mike Carey Reviewed By Purplycookie

  28. 5 out of 5

    J.

    This series continues to be strong and deep. It hits on many of the same mythopoeic ideas started in Sandman, but has more of an emphasis on heavy philosophical ideas like free will and religion. Synopsis: (view spoiler)[ The Basanos manipulate Jane Presto into taking them into Lucifer's new realm, where they attack and seemingly defeat him. It is clear to me that Susano-o-no-Mikoto is somehow involved in this, but I couldn't figure out exactly what was going on. Meanwhile, a creature sent by the This series continues to be strong and deep. It hits on many of the same mythopoeic ideas started in Sandman, but has more of an emphasis on heavy philosophical ideas like free will and religion. Synopsis: (view spoiler)[ The Basanos manipulate Jane Presto into taking them into Lucifer's new realm, where they attack and seemingly defeat him. It is clear to me that Susano-o-no-Mikoto is somehow involved in this, but I couldn't figure out exactly what was going on. Meanwhile, a creature sent by the Basanos attacks and kills (?) Elaine Belloc, who has managed to pick up a fallen cherub sidekick named Gaudium. The Lilim continue to make war plans. A deep tragedy interlude, in which a centaur falls prey to the time lapse between the two worlds. Jane Presto despairs, refuses to submit to the Basanos. They reject her as a willing servant, and use her as a slave, instead, apparently impregnating her with a baby Basanos. (? I think this will probably become clear as we continue on.) Elaine and Gaudium find Lucifer's body, and Elaine, at the behest of Meleos, gives her life to resurrect him. The Lilim arrive, aiding Lucifer's plan instead of attacking him, and Lucifer manages to capture Jane Presto, thus threatening the Basanos plan. It becomes clear that the Basanos divination skills are weakened in Lucifer's realm, due to their distance from Destiny's book. The Basanos decide to self-destruct after Lucifer promises to spare their baby. Susano-o-no-Mikoto gets away with whatever it was he was after. Lucifer heads to hell, where he has a prearranged meeting. Michael is cast from heaven due to his interference, sending Gaudium to protect Elaine. Gaudium attempts to collect an artifact to resurrect Elaine, in a very funny final issue of the volume. (hide spoiler)]

  29. 4 out of 5

    Darrell

    In the last volume, Lucifer made the Lilim his enemies for no reason other than his own arrogance. Now that he has opened the door to his new universe to all and sundry, the Lilim and his other enemies such as the Shinto pantheon and the Living Tarot are ready to strike. Since the Living Tarot and the leader of the Lilim can both see the future, Lucifer would seem to be at a disadvantage. The archangel Michael and a centaur from Lucifer’s universe also see a glimpse of the future, and of course, In the last volume, Lucifer made the Lilim his enemies for no reason other than his own arrogance. Now that he has opened the door to his new universe to all and sundry, the Lilim and his other enemies such as the Shinto pantheon and the Living Tarot are ready to strike. Since the Living Tarot and the leader of the Lilim can both see the future, Lucifer would seem to be at a disadvantage. The archangel Michael and a centaur from Lucifer’s universe also see a glimpse of the future, and of course, everything that’s happened so far was predestined by God. Since he’s made so few allies and he’s ignored all warnings, the only way Lucifer will stand a chance is if one or more of his former enemies decides he’s the lesser of two evils and helps him. The Sandman character who gets a cameo this time is Death of the Endless. In the tradition of all great tragedy, Lucifer really brought about his own downfall due to a significant character flaw. Lucifer is pretty much the embodiment of arrogance and claims he doesn’t need help from anybody, so it was nice to see him humbled for once. As this is a typical comic book, don’t be surprised if a dead character or two comes back to life. Of course, now that I think about it, the dead coming back to life is a reoccurring theme in world mythology. Since this book is based on various different mythologies, it makes sense we’d see a lot of rebirths. Also, as we’ve come to expect, Lucifer yet again negotiates by offering death to someone who wants to die.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aldi

    So much good stuff in this. Thoughts in no particular order: -I can watch Mazikeen be war leader all damn day long -Elaine, oh my girl. Better days are coming, I promise. -Michael just sort of... kills me? In a story choc-a-bloc with angels and their purity and virtue and blah-blah-bored-now, and especially in a story with a protagonist like Lucifer, Michael could so easily have come off stodgy and lame. But somehow he works, in all his vast and ancient archaic goodness. When he's in pain, you can So much good stuff in this. Thoughts in no particular order: -I can watch Mazikeen be war leader all damn day long -Elaine, oh my girl. Better days are coming, I promise. -Michael just sort of... kills me? In a story choc-a-bloc with angels and their purity and virtue and blah-blah-bored-now, and especially in a story with a protagonist like Lucifer, Michael could so easily have come off stodgy and lame. But somehow he works, in all his vast and ancient archaic goodness. When he's in pain, you can almost feel the world shudder from the impact, and when he (view spoiler)[finally turns (hide spoiler)] , I literally pumped my fist and went "yessss." -Death cameo, hell yeah! -I had forgotten all about Kira and how much I loved her story and her world. -Sticking it to god and working tirelessly to find a way out of predestination. Again, it's one of those ideas that's almost too big to work, but Carey makes it not only work but look effortless. Bastard. -Dean Ormston's art is funny. It's not a particularly eye-catching style at first glance but as you follow it and let it draw you in, it really comes alive. -The Basanos have really kind of worn out their welcome as villains by now, so I was glad that got wrapped up. -And among all that pathos, epic stakes and high drama, Gaudium and Spera just strike the perfect humorous counter-tone with their cranky bickering and little side quest. I love them so much. And goddamn it, but those extra covers are gorgeous. I want them all framed.

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