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An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street (Le Fanu Ghost & Horror Collection)

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It is not worth telling, this story of mine—at least, not worth writing. Told, indeed, as I have sometimes been called upon to tell it, to a circle of intelligent and eager faces, lighted up by a good after-dinner fire on a winter's evening, with a cold wind rising and wailing outside, and all snug and cosy within, it has gone off—though I say it, who should not—indifferen It is not worth telling, this story of mine—at least, not worth writing. Told, indeed, as I have sometimes been called upon to tell it, to a circle of intelligent and eager faces, lighted up by a good after-dinner fire on a winter's evening, with a cold wind rising and wailing outside, and all snug and cosy within, it has gone off—though I say it, who should not—indifferent well. But it is a venture to do as you would have me. Pen, ink, and paper are cold vehicles for the marvellous, and a "reader" decidedly a more critical animal than a "listener." If, however, you can induce your friends to read it after nightfall, and when the fireside talk has run for a while on thrilling tales of shapeless terror; in short, if you will secure me the mollia tempora fandi, I will go to my work, and say my say, with better heart. Well, then, these conditions presupposed, I shall waste no more words, but tell you simply how it all happened.........


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It is not worth telling, this story of mine—at least, not worth writing. Told, indeed, as I have sometimes been called upon to tell it, to a circle of intelligent and eager faces, lighted up by a good after-dinner fire on a winter's evening, with a cold wind rising and wailing outside, and all snug and cosy within, it has gone off—though I say it, who should not—indifferen It is not worth telling, this story of mine—at least, not worth writing. Told, indeed, as I have sometimes been called upon to tell it, to a circle of intelligent and eager faces, lighted up by a good after-dinner fire on a winter's evening, with a cold wind rising and wailing outside, and all snug and cosy within, it has gone off—though I say it, who should not—indifferent well. But it is a venture to do as you would have me. Pen, ink, and paper are cold vehicles for the marvellous, and a "reader" decidedly a more critical animal than a "listener." If, however, you can induce your friends to read it after nightfall, and when the fireside talk has run for a while on thrilling tales of shapeless terror; in short, if you will secure me the mollia tempora fandi, I will go to my work, and say my say, with better heart. Well, then, these conditions presupposed, I shall waste no more words, but tell you simply how it all happened.........

52 review for An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street (Le Fanu Ghost & Horror Collection)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Suki St Charles

    31 Classic Horror Stories Every Fan Should Read in October: A Literary Advent Calender for Halloween: Day 18: https://www.oldstyletales.com/single-... 31 Classic Horror Stories Every Fan Should Read in October: A Literary Advent Calender for Halloween: Day 18: https://www.oldstyletales.com/single-...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Warriner

    A very good "haunted house" story, and my first time reading Irish author Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814–1873). Years before the "present-day" narrative, a Judge Horrocks, who'd earned a reputation as the "hanging judge" or "the hangin'est judge that ever was known in Ireland" had ended his life by hanging himself. This was in an old Dublin house, to where the narrator and his cousin Tom Ludlow move, as it's close to their lecture halls and amusements and also, since the building is owned by Tom' A very good "haunted house" story, and my first time reading Irish author Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814–1873). Years before the "present-day" narrative, a Judge Horrocks, who'd earned a reputation as the "hanging judge" or "the hangin'est judge that ever was known in Ireland" had ended his life by hanging himself. This was in an old Dublin house, to where the narrator and his cousin Tom Ludlow move, as it's close to their lecture halls and amusements and also, since the building is owned by Tom's father, they can lodge there so long as it remains unlet. The young men are then haunted to the brink of insanity. These lines stood out: "One of the most remarkable phenomena connected with the practice of mendacity is the vast number of deliberate lies we tell ourselves, whom, of all persons, we can least expect to deceive. In all this, I need hardly tell you, Dick, I was simply lying to myself, and did not believe one word of the wretched humbug. Yet I went on, as men will do, like persevering charlatans and impostors, who tire people into credulity by the mere force of reiteration; so I hoped to win myself over at last to a comfortable scepticism about the ghost."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈

    SPOOKTOBER CONTINUES!! fulfilling my shortie Spooktober challenge to read one spooky short story a day. Day one: The Magic Shop by H.G. Wells Day two: Everything's Fine by Matthew Pridham Day three: It Came From Hell and Smashed the Angels by Gregor Xane Day four: Sometimes They Come Back by Stephen King Day five: The Curse of Yig by H.P. Lovecraft Day six: The Spook House by Ambrose Bierce I have never before read a Le Fanu story before, though I own a few like Through a Glass Darkly and Carmilla. What SPOOKTOBER CONTINUES!! fulfilling my shortie Spooktober challenge to read one spooky short story a day. Day one: The Magic Shop by H.G. Wells Day two: Everything's Fine by Matthew Pridham Day three: It Came From Hell and Smashed the Angels by Gregor Xane Day four: Sometimes They Come Back by Stephen King Day five: The Curse of Yig by H.P. Lovecraft Day six: The Spook House by Ambrose Bierce I have never before read a Le Fanu story before, though I own a few like Through a Glass Darkly and Carmilla. What I do know is that he is one of the writers very well known for the Victorian gothic ghost story, and this short story did not disappoint. Every body knows how contagious is fear of all sorts, but more especially that particular kind of fear under which poor Tom was at that moment labouring. I would not have heard, nor I believe would he have recapitulated, just at that moment, for half the world, the details of the hideous vision which had so unmanned him. This story is exactly what a short story should be. It is not too short, not too long, serves up a perfect small snapshot of a story, and leaves it there, for the reader to devour. It tells of two medical students who inhabit a relative's house in town in order to skirt on paying rent, and to be closer to their school. Soon after, our narrator suffers from debilitating nightmares of a portrait of an old man and quickly begins hearing things in the dark, namely bare feet descending the stairs. His cousin, on the other hand, shows up in his bedroom, once, white as a sheet and obviously disturbed, and says nothing but that they need to secure a new place to live. This is a perfect little ghosty story that is very heavy on description and atmosphere, but leaves a lot up in the air in terms of tangible supernatural effects. And the result was something I very much appreciated. After finishing, there is that hint of wonder as to the events of the story and whether they really indeed happened, or whether fear and superstition superseded normal rational thought and created ghosts out of everyday, more benign happenings. Have you ever found yourself alone and heard a very normal creak or groan of a house, or wind outside and found yourself becoming frightened of something that you've created in your mind? This story lives in that place where your mind creates more terror than the outside world can provide, that sometimes the combination of the unknown, the dark, and solitude can create monsters lurking in hallways. But sometimes, sometimes, ghosts do exist. 4 stars for a story that perfectly sums up Spooktober. You can read it for FREE here: http://www.online-literature.com/lefa...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anna From Gustine

    This is a short story of two medical students in Dublin who spend some time in a house haunted by a wicked judge. I thought it was....fine. I've heard great things about the writer J. Sheridan Le Fanu and really enjoyed his book Carmilla. I thought there were some great elements in this story, but the elements didn't fit together in the end. I give it three stars though because it was well-written and I did keep reading, but the pay off left much to be desired. :-( This is a short story of two medical students in Dublin who spend some time in a house haunted by a wicked judge. I thought it was....fine. I've heard great things about the writer J. Sheridan Le Fanu and really enjoyed his book Carmilla. I thought there were some great elements in this story, but the elements didn't fit together in the end. I give it three stars though because it was well-written and I did keep reading, but the pay off left much to be desired. :-(

  5. 5 out of 5

    Angel Navarro

    It was good, nothing remarkable but entertaining enough.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    There is no justice. As a corrupt judge continues his corruption into the afterlife, a couple of innocent bystanders, two college students, get wrapped up in the ongoing machinations of a malevolent being. A spooky house with bad vibes which causes the occupants to question their senses. This is a classic ghost story. Pleasant dreams. Originally published in 1851 in Dublin University Magazine. Le Fanu is most well known for his ghost and horror stories.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Farren

    I love how this story ends. After telling of a cruel judge who commits suicide by hanging and haunts the house he died in, driving its occupants mad or throwing them down the stairs to their deaths, he says, " having acquitted myself of my engagement, I wish you a very good night, and pleasant dreams." I love how this story ends. After telling of a cruel judge who commits suicide by hanging and haunts the house he died in, driving its occupants mad or throwing them down the stairs to their deaths, he says, " having acquitted myself of my engagement, I wish you a very good night, and pleasant dreams."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Chateau

    One of the best books I've ever read. Certainly the best I've read in a while. I'm not sure it was meant to be funny but the English and diction style cracked me the hell up. I found it hilarious. Not as much scary as it was creepy. Very interesting. Regrettable that it's just a short story. One of the best books I've ever read. Certainly the best I've read in a while. I'm not sure it was meant to be funny but the English and diction style cracked me the hell up. I found it hilarious. Not as much scary as it was creepy. Very interesting. Regrettable that it's just a short story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Frog

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This ghost story definitely built up the tension. It’s about a haunted house that two lodgers move into. But soon they both start seeing things like a floating portrait of an angry old man and a giant rat. They hear footsteps dragging down the stairs as well. Eventually they leave the house and learn it’s history from a local woman in town. It was entertaining and the whole time I was trying to picture the house and happenings in my head which wasn’t difficult with the descriptive language provi This ghost story definitely built up the tension. It’s about a haunted house that two lodgers move into. But soon they both start seeing things like a floating portrait of an angry old man and a giant rat. They hear footsteps dragging down the stairs as well. Eventually they leave the house and learn it’s history from a local woman in town. It was entertaining and the whole time I was trying to picture the house and happenings in my head which wasn’t difficult with the descriptive language provided.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Ullmer

    "Punch however, which makes beasts of so many, made a man of me again..." After my last Le Fanu story, "Dickon the Devil", a story as disappointing as eating a mound of cake-shaped frosting, this story delivered upon the scares deliciously. I was quite disturbed by the new monster featured in this story. "Punch however, which makes beasts of so many, made a man of me again..." After my last Le Fanu story, "Dickon the Devil", a story as disappointing as eating a mound of cake-shaped frosting, this story delivered upon the scares deliciously. I was quite disturbed by the new monster featured in this story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carla

    3.5*

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Set in Dublin, 19th century, an old Judge (Horrocks) haunts a house that has been bought by the father of one of two medical students (cousins) - Tom and Dick (narrator), who are currently lodging in the house in Aungier Street. In keeping with his character in life, the judge's ghost is belligerent and menacing. The Judge's ghost's unconstructive behavior reflects on his work as a judge. Anyone who comes into close vicinity with the Judge, including into close proximity with his previous living Set in Dublin, 19th century, an old Judge (Horrocks) haunts a house that has been bought by the father of one of two medical students (cousins) - Tom and Dick (narrator), who are currently lodging in the house in Aungier Street. In keeping with his character in life, the judge's ghost is belligerent and menacing. The Judge's ghost's unconstructive behavior reflects on his work as a judge. Anyone who comes into close vicinity with the Judge, including into close proximity with his previous living quarters, doesn't fair well. Tom eventually succumbs to contagion when he switches to a career in the Church. Medical students, who vocation is the preservation of life, were, perhaps, a particular irritation to the Judge, who dispensed deadly sentences. Depicts family life, especially the life of the drinking Irish man, and the life and times of the house, which goes from a substantial residence in current times (home of a wealthy old maid) to a lodging house (a family with three children living in one room). The house had originally been the property of a Sir Thomas Hacket, Mayor of Dublin, in the time of James II, forfeited in 1702. The past history of the house adds to the house's mystery and those who participated in the social scenes and dinners that would have taken place in it. The haunted feelings that evading felons would have felt (the Judge's "clients"), are connected to the atmosphere of the house too. It raises questions about society and its role in running a satisfactory nation. Distancing oneself from the scene of past horrors is natural. Difficult lives and times needed sympathy. The judge had a lack of human understanding which extended to his own daughter and the Irish folks he passed judgement on. The story reflects class issues, the welfare of others and social injustice. Creates the discordance in the reader, and likewise the characters in the book, which would have been felt by the accused Irish men and women of earlier times.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Stahl

    Fairly creepy. Rather typical ghost story all round though. What has been bothering me is I just know I have read this since the last time I read Le Fanu's short stories. It all seemed so familiar to me. Fairly creepy. Rather typical ghost story all round though. What has been bothering me is I just know I have read this since the last time I read Le Fanu's short stories. It all seemed so familiar to me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    Tom's father bought an old mansion which just happens to be near his college so he and his cousin Dick decide to move in. But what no one knows is that this house was once owned by a judge who hung himself with a child's jump rope... Tom's father bought an old mansion which just happens to be near his college so he and his cousin Dick decide to move in. But what no one knows is that this house was once owned by a judge who hung himself with a child's jump rope...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erin Powe

    Maybe the scariest ghost story I’ve read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Ives

    Rather more creepy than scary per se, this short story makes for quite a compelling read, with some nice touches from Le Fanu.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Classic late-19th century ghost story. Well done. Creepy without being overly horrible or ghoulish.

  18. 5 out of 5

    B.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bart

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lenora

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mai Badawi

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joachim Ahlbeck

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amy Goodman

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

  28. 5 out of 5

    WheeldonHS

  29. 4 out of 5

    Angélica

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark Grinage

  31. 5 out of 5

    abcdefg

  32. 5 out of 5

    Roxie Prince

  33. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

  34. 5 out of 5

    Nora Franklin

  35. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  36. 5 out of 5

    Tephra

  37. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  38. 4 out of 5

    Man Solo

  39. 5 out of 5

    Priya

  40. 5 out of 5

    Cionaudha

  41. 5 out of 5

    Imperatrix Mundi

  42. 5 out of 5

    Candice

  43. 5 out of 5

    Matias

  44. 5 out of 5

    Ari

  45. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

  46. 4 out of 5

    Anna Hyer

  47. 4 out of 5

    Adriana

  48. 5 out of 5

    Imi

  49. 4 out of 5

    Emil Sinclair

  50. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  51. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

  52. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

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