web site hit counter We Are All Made of Molecules - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

We Are All Made of Molecules

Availability: Ready to download

Thirteen-year-old Stewart is academically brilliant but socially clueless. Fourteen-year-old Ashley is the undisputed “It” girl in her class, but her grades stink. Their worlds are about to collide when Stewart and his dad move in with Ashley and her mom. Stewart is trying to be 89.9 percent happy about it, but Ashley is 110 percent horrified. She already has to hide the r Thirteen-year-old Stewart is academically brilliant but socially clueless. Fourteen-year-old Ashley is the undisputed “It” girl in her class, but her grades stink. Their worlds are about to collide when Stewart and his dad move in with Ashley and her mom. Stewart is trying to be 89.9 percent happy about it, but Ashley is 110 percent horrified. She already has to hide the real reason her dad moved out; “Spewart” could further threaten her position at the top of the social ladder. They are complete opposites. And yet, they have one thing in common: they—like everyone else—are made of molecules.


Compare

Thirteen-year-old Stewart is academically brilliant but socially clueless. Fourteen-year-old Ashley is the undisputed “It” girl in her class, but her grades stink. Their worlds are about to collide when Stewart and his dad move in with Ashley and her mom. Stewart is trying to be 89.9 percent happy about it, but Ashley is 110 percent horrified. She already has to hide the r Thirteen-year-old Stewart is academically brilliant but socially clueless. Fourteen-year-old Ashley is the undisputed “It” girl in her class, but her grades stink. Their worlds are about to collide when Stewart and his dad move in with Ashley and her mom. Stewart is trying to be 89.9 percent happy about it, but Ashley is 110 percent horrified. She already has to hide the real reason her dad moved out; “Spewart” could further threaten her position at the top of the social ladder. They are complete opposites. And yet, they have one thing in common: they—like everyone else—are made of molecules.

30 review for We Are All Made of Molecules

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    We Are All Made of Molecules is a quick read with some interesting themes: bringing families together, grief and loss, Dads "coming out" and children having to deal with that... But, sadly, it never quite lives up to its interesting premise. The blurb on the hardcover copy promises a book that is "hilarious" but it is an incredibly immature humour (like calling Stewart "Spewart") that I'm fairly sure most people won't find funny. And, on top of that, it's very hard to sell this book to anyone. Th We Are All Made of Molecules is a quick read with some interesting themes: bringing families together, grief and loss, Dads "coming out" and children having to deal with that... But, sadly, it never quite lives up to its interesting premise. The blurb on the hardcover copy promises a book that is "hilarious" but it is an incredibly immature humour (like calling Stewart "Spewart") that I'm fairly sure most people won't find funny. And, on top of that, it's very hard to sell this book to anyone. There are some adult/older teen themes that feel at odds with the young, silly narrative. I think it's meant to be YA because of it's content, but the simple language and young-feeling humour have made many people shelve this as middle grade/childrens, including me. The book is told from two POVs - Stewart (13) and Ashley (14). Stewart's dad is marrying Ashley's mom and both of them have to deal with the new family, as well as dealing with the loss of Stewart's mom to cancer and Ashley's dad's "coming out". Both of these characters feel so much younger than they are supposed to be. Stewart thinks like a child of about seven years old. If I didn't know his age, I would never guess he was supposed to be a teenage boy! Ashley is the one who calls Stewart "Spewart" - the kind of thing I recall kids doing at about five or six, yet she is supposed to be fourteen. Not only that, but she is a horrible character that was never really redeemed for me. I understand her parents divorce was hard on her, but it doesn't excuse how shallow, bratty and just plain nasty she is. She is also pretty stupid, but if that's supposed to be an endearing balance to her meanness - it isn't working. Not my cup of tea. Not really sure whose cup of tea this would be, either. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube | Pinterest

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Darling

    2.5 stars Love the narrative voice, and the idea of a book about blending a family (including the girl's recently out father and his new boyfriend). There are a few sweet moments, and some touching, if brief, memories of a mom who has passed away. But Stewart seems really young--so much so that this reads almost more like middle grade, except that there are some unpleasant things that happen later on which would make this inappropriate for a younger age group. He's nerdy and endearing, but he fe 2.5 stars Love the narrative voice, and the idea of a book about blending a family (including the girl's recently out father and his new boyfriend). There are a few sweet moments, and some touching, if brief, memories of a mom who has passed away. But Stewart seems really young--so much so that this reads almost more like middle grade, except that there are some unpleasant things that happen later on which would make this inappropriate for a younger age group. He's nerdy and endearing, but he feels very much like a character--his perspective doesn't feel like a thirteen-year-old boy's at all. I also really, really disliked Ashley, the other POV. I'm pretty patient with YA characters, and obviously her parents' divorce is hard on her. But she is a selfish, shallow brat, plain and simple, and the very few redeeming things she eventually does aren't enough to negate all the terrible, mean-spirited, and dumb things she says and does throughout the rest of the book. I guess she's supposed to be a Cher-from-Clueless type character, but this misses the mark in making her at all sympathetic or interesting. I'm kind of annoyed at two serious moments that feel jarring in this type of lighthearted narrative, too. (view spoiler)[Rape comes up twice, as does someone taking compromising photos on a cell phone. (hide spoiler)] And actually, there's another thing--a hate crime directed towards Ashley's father. We move past these incidents too quickly and without enough thought for the physical and emotional consequences. I expect more out of any book, let alone a book written for young readers. So--a very mixed bag for me. I'm not the audience for this book, but beyond that, I'm not really sure who the audience would really be. An review copy was provided by the publisher.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Giselle

    A finished unsolicited copy was provided by the publisher for review. Stewart and Ashley are step-siblings and each one has to learn how to accept one another in their life. Stewart is intelligent and loves school while Ashley is the most popular girl of grade nine. When times are tough, they end up realizing how important family really is and they realize how much they need each other in their lives. I had no idea how funny this book would be because when you start it, it's not the happiest of st A finished unsolicited copy was provided by the publisher for review. Stewart and Ashley are step-siblings and each one has to learn how to accept one another in their life. Stewart is intelligent and loves school while Ashley is the most popular girl of grade nine. When times are tough, they end up realizing how important family really is and they realize how much they need each other in their lives. I had no idea how funny this book would be because when you start it, it's not the happiest of starts. We find out something terrible and I was afraid it would be depressing. Glad I was wrong, because not only was this book funny, it also had the cutest moments. We see two very different sides of the social ladder at a high school and I love how it's from two different social cliques. We see how each character thinks and feels and how their actions become muddled. I love how both Stewart and Ashley aren't perfect. They're wholly realistic. I just knew both of the characters would learn something by the end, and I'm so happy they do because they grow and mature and it's was just so nice to see. Susin Nielsen really understands how they both think and feel and then executes the story in a serious but warm-hearted way. I flew through this one! Not only were there parts about school, but about family and friendship. It was a well-rounded middle grade contemporary read which I really enjoyed. I needed to highlight some of the more hilarious quotes where I actually giggled out loud: "I am counting the days 'till I can become unconstipated." (62) "High school is a doggy-dog world." (75) "We Are All Made of Molecules" is a quick humorous and poignant read about teens who are just trying to live their lives in the best way possible. You'll laugh and cry along with these two characters, for sure.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Korrina (OwlCrate)

    Really great, quick read. Absolutely loved Stewart! And I loved reading a story that took place in Vancouver, and in my neighbourhood! So incredibly cool.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erin Bow

    I got the ARC of this at OLA today and read the entire thing on a packed commuter train home to Kitchener. It made me both snort-laugh (loudly, like an elephant seal) and tear up. People -- more grown-up people, Muggles probably -- stared. I will get the hardcover of this when it comes out to support Susin in the writing of Many More Excellent Books. I'm becoming such a fan! ... Joie de beaver .... !!!! I got the ARC of this at OLA today and read the entire thing on a packed commuter train home to Kitchener. It made me both snort-laugh (loudly, like an elephant seal) and tear up. People -- more grown-up people, Muggles probably -- stared. I will get the hardcover of this when it comes out to support Susin in the writing of Many More Excellent Books. I'm becoming such a fan! ... Joie de beaver .... !!!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bee

    It took a while for me to get into this book, because I didn't really like Ashely, but Stewart was wonderful! If you liked 'Wonder' by R.J. Palacio, then this funny and complicated blended family will warm your heart! It took a while for me to get into this book, because I didn't really like Ashely, but Stewart was wonderful! If you liked 'Wonder' by R.J. Palacio, then this funny and complicated blended family will warm your heart!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Evie

    I decided to pick this book up mainly because an author friend of mine whom I respect and adore wrote this on her Facebook page: "I think tearing up on PAGE 2 of a book has to be a record for me. Seriously, from a smile to a gasp in like 200 or so words is not what normally happens to me at the beginning of reading a book. But yeah, these last 24 or so hours have been filled with those moments." And because I am a sucker for emotionally gutting stories and I always trust Joanne Levy's opinions, I decided to pick this book up mainly because an author friend of mine whom I respect and adore wrote this on her Facebook page: "I think tearing up on PAGE 2 of a book has to be a record for me. Seriously, from a smile to a gasp in like 200 or so words is not what normally happens to me at the beginning of reading a book. But yeah, these last 24 or so hours have been filled with those moments." And because I am a sucker for emotionally gutting stories and I always trust Joanne Levy's opinions, I immediately reached for my copy of We Are All Made of Molecules. Joanne wasn't lying or exaggerating when she said this book made her cry (and on page 2!). I experienced the exact same thing. And even though I already knew I should brace myself for waterworks, I still cried. I think I even sobbed a bit. I mean, the way that opening scene was written totally got to me. Being a mom of a 16 month old baby girl, I tend to get ridiculously emotional about anything family-related, baby-related, mom-related and especially loss-related (and yes, that also includes Sarah Mclachlan and her SPCA tear-jerkers). Of course, not everyone will feel the same about the opening chapter, but if you're anything like me - soft on the inside and slightly hormonal - be sure to have a box of tissues handy. We Are All Made of Molecules tells a story of a family torn apart by illness and death and stitched back together with a delicate and fragile thread of hope, new beginnings and love. Stewart's mom died from cancer two years ago and his entire life pretty much fell apart. Both Stewart and his father are still in pain because of that, but it is time to move on. Stewart's dad had found and a new partner and they are moving in with her and her daughter. New beginnings are never easy and this one is looking particularly tough for all parties involved. Stewart is 13 years old and he is very intellectually gifted. Unfortunately, his social skills are lacking and he simply doesn't know how to go about making new friends. That proves particularly problematic when he's faced with moving to a new place, going to a new school and living with a 14 year old girl who seems to hate him from the get-go (and for no reason at all). Ashley is a bratty teenager with a mean streak and plenty of attitude. She hates having to live with her mom's new boyfriend and his "freakazoid" son and she makes it very clear every chance she gets. She's downright rude and unnecessarily cruel, and I really did not like her at all, even though I kind of understand where she was coming from. After all, her own life wasn't exactly perfect. Still, there are worse things that could happen than your dad announcing he is gay and it doesn't excuse her drama-queen attitude, snobbish behavior and disrespecting her parents. That being said, I do think both Stewart and Ashley were very realistically portrayed, with all the character flaws, quirks and annoying tendencies appropriate for young teenagers in a very challenging and emotional situation. I thought Susin did an outstanding job showing the emotional torment of the kids, as well as the struggles of their parents. We Are All Made of Molecules is a beautiful, engaging and meaningful tale about two fractured families being blended into one whole one again. The beginnings are never easy - heck, they are scary and intimidating and seemingly disastrous - but in the end, love wins. The message here is clear and powerful, and delivered in a very convincing, thoughtful way. I really loved this book and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys heartfelt contemporary fiction dealing with difficult (but very important) themes.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laurence R.

    What an emotional ride! I would be lying if I said this book didn't make me shed a tear or two - although I did have to look as composed as I could because I read it in the school bus. It was truly amazing. While I cried, or really wanted to, of sadness, I was also really touched, especially at the end. I had a huge smile on my face and watery eyes, but by then I didn't care what everyone else thought of me. It was just too beautiful for me not to cry. This is by far my favourite part of the book What an emotional ride! I would be lying if I said this book didn't make me shed a tear or two - although I did have to look as composed as I could because I read it in the school bus. It was truly amazing. While I cried, or really wanted to, of sadness, I was also really touched, especially at the end. I had a huge smile on my face and watery eyes, but by then I didn't care what everyone else thought of me. It was just too beautiful for me not to cry. This is by far my favourite part of the book, because I don't cry that often of happiness or simply because I'm touched, but this book really hit the nail. Also, the title and its importance in the story made me smile because this is a thought I absolutely love. The characters are really well developped in this story, and while I might not have loved all of them from the beginning - such as Ashley - I still understood them and learned to love them. Obviously, there's an idiot, to say the least, that I would never in a million years love, but that's fine, too. I felt sad for Phil, Ashley's dad, for a big part of the book, because he's such a nice person who doesn't deserve the hate he receives. I feel really connected with the main characters and I will remember them for a long time - Schrödinger included. I would recommend this book to everyone, from my sister to my mother, because it's the kind of book that makes you feel good after reading it. I learned a lot from it and this is why I think everyone would be better with this book in their lives. (Thank you NetGalley for providing me with a digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    PRODUCT PLACEMENT QUESTION - IS THIS NOW A THING? Now I was innocently thinking that the concept of product placement would not really apply to books - I mean I can't see Givenchy calling up Sarah Waters' agent with a great deal although I can see a nice comedy sketch you could write - but anyway, I found a genuine product placement thing right here in this very book page 194. It's the summer holidays and Georgia my daughter has finished her exams and can now read novels again - so she was readin PRODUCT PLACEMENT QUESTION - IS THIS NOW A THING? Now I was innocently thinking that the concept of product placement would not really apply to books - I mean I can't see Givenchy calling up Sarah Waters' agent with a great deal although I can see a nice comedy sketch you could write - but anyway, I found a genuine product placement thing right here in this very book page 194. It's the summer holidays and Georgia my daughter has finished her exams and can now read novels again - so she was reading this one and pointed it out to me : So, on the second anniversary of her death, we spent the morning visiting all of her favourite places, Dad even bought me a book that was recommended by one of the staff at Kidsbooks, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie. And at the end of this volume, lo and behold, an advert for .... The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie. And both books are published by Andersen Press. I mean, it's trivial, but still. I never saw that before.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Meredith ( on Semi-Hiatus until February)

    I loved everything about this book, especially Schrodinger the cat! I highly recommend We Are All Made of Molecules, it will make you laugh and cry!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yoda

    It's a great feel-good novel. Most of new YA novels are about romance and finding "the one" etc. This one is all about family and it's GREAT! I loved it from start to finish, I like that we get two points of view. I loved the innocence I had to laugh a bit for myself sometimes just because it was a bit cute/adorable. It's a great feel-good novel. Most of new YA novels are about romance and finding "the one" etc. This one is all about family and it's GREAT! I loved it from start to finish, I like that we get two points of view. I loved the innocence I had to laugh a bit for myself sometimes just because it was a bit cute/adorable.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Krista Regester

    This book was so sweet - it's perfect for someone about to go into high school. The characters weren't so lovable at first but somewhere throughout the book you start to feel like you really know them. I also appreciated the subtle lgbt parts. This book was so sweet - it's perfect for someone about to go into high school. The characters weren't so lovable at first but somewhere throughout the book you start to feel like you really know them. I also appreciated the subtle lgbt parts.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Stewart is the very definition of a nerd-- loves academics, socially awkward, eccentric. His father is a bit that way as well, but after the death of Stewart's mother, meets Caroline, a newswoman who works at the same station he does, and the two decide to combine their families. Caroline's daughter, Ashley, is an obnoxious, not-very-bright fashionista who refers to Stewart as "[Leonard's] midget-egghead-freakazoid of a son". Part of Ashley's trauma is dure to the fact that her much loved father Stewart is the very definition of a nerd-- loves academics, socially awkward, eccentric. His father is a bit that way as well, but after the death of Stewart's mother, meets Caroline, a newswoman who works at the same station he does, and the two decide to combine their families. Caroline's daughter, Ashley, is an obnoxious, not-very-bright fashionista who refers to Stewart as "[Leonard's] midget-egghead-freakazoid of a son". Part of Ashley's trauma is dure to the fact that her much loved father has left her mother and moved into the guest house on the property... because he's gay. Ashley is afraid that her friends will be "gayist" and the fact that her father is gay will hurt her social standing. She ignores Stewart completely until he tells her he has spoken to Jared, on whom Ashley has a crush. Stewart manages to help facilitate their relationship, but Jared turns out to be a complete and utter jerk. Stewart is still dealing with missing his mother, but in a healthy and productive way. His mother lived a very different kind of life from Caroline's, but the two families, along with Ashley's father, manage to fashion a somewhat harmonious coexistence. Strengths: Ashley is obnoxious, but for good reason, and she does change and grow. Stewart knows that he's a work in progress and attempts daily to become more social and to get along with Caroline. Seeing his thought process was marvelous. The grief is addressed in a healthy manner-- no one is so stricken that it's impossible to go on. What a relief! The story with Ashley's father was well done and very realistic. This is a great read for boys AND girls, and I adore that the cover has cross gender appeal. Bravo! Weaknesses: The situation with Jared comes perilously close to being too young adult, but this is a great book for both middle and high school libraries, since Stewart is in 8th grade, and Ashley is in 9th. Brilliant how Stewart draws on a lesson from his mother to save Ashley from a bad situation. Basically, very few weaknesses! What I really think: Not a huge fan of this author usually, but I adored this.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rissa

    3.75⭐️ His mom died of cancer her dad turned out to be gay. His dad and him moved in with her and her mom forced to put up with each other Ashley doesn't know what to do and Stewart he always wanted a sister both of the worlds have been flipped upside down. I have to deal with this they have to adjust to a new everything new life without their parent a life with a new parent a new sibling Facebook was very real to say the least she talked about different food shows and sitcom his school friends w 3.75⭐️ His mom died of cancer her dad turned out to be gay. His dad and him moved in with her and her mom forced to put up with each other Ashley doesn't know what to do and Stewart he always wanted a sister both of the worlds have been flipped upside down. I have to deal with this they have to adjust to a new everything new life without their parent a life with a new parent a new sibling Facebook was very real to say the least she talked about different food shows and sitcom his school friends work everything that any regular person watches your does. It was nice to read a book about real people living in our world and I really enjoyed it. When she was talking about being unconstipated I was so confused why she said it a few times before they explained what it was I didn't know if the author spelled it wrong or she didn't know what it meant but then finally when Leonard said I think the word you're looking for is emancipated I was like oh my gosh I'm dying of laughter I thought that's what she was talking about but I was like I don't understand. I think Ashley ask about your Mattick but semi reasonable. (all things considered) Stewart I think he's numb to the whole situation and is trying to make the best of it but I think he's gonna break. The ending was beautifully done, i really liked how she wrapped everything up. Everyones family, everyone problems, school, life just everything. In the end we are all just made of molecules. "till I become unconstipated" "I think the word you're looking for is emancipated" "My family is FUBAR" "if my life was a movie I'd toss out the footage"

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Actual rating: 4.5 Stars! -- I'm not sure what I was expecting from this novel, but I got way more than I had hoped for. We Are All Made Of Molecules teaches so many important lessons all packed into one short, but sweet, novel. It deals with bullying, homophobia, sexual assault on top of so many other things. This is one of those books that every young teen should be reading. Actual rating: 4.5 Stars! -- I'm not sure what I was expecting from this novel, but I got way more than I had hoped for. We Are All Made Of Molecules teaches so many important lessons all packed into one short, but sweet, novel. It deals with bullying, homophobia, sexual assault on top of so many other things. This is one of those books that every young teen should be reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lucija The Reader

    Thanks to Penguin UK for providing me a physical copy for a review. This book is amazing. It is so fast-pace and fun. I loved the story and I couldn't put this book down. But, I didn't like Ashley in the beggining at all, and Jared was clearly just using Stewart to get Ashley. The writing was very good. Stewart was weird, but in a good way. I like this book a lot, it is so heartwarming, and I recommend it to anyone. Thanks to Penguin UK for providing me a physical copy for a review. This book is amazing. It is so fast-pace and fun. I loved the story and I couldn't put this book down. But, I didn't like Ashley in the beggining at all, and Jared was clearly just using Stewart to get Ashley. The writing was very good. Stewart was weird, but in a good way. I like this book a lot, it is so heartwarming, and I recommend it to anyone.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    We Are All Made of Molecules is a heart warming tale of unsuspected friendships and the true meaning of family.... This book is told in two different perspectives. The first is of Ashley (a typical fashion diva and a school wide popular girl) and the second is of Stewart ( a "gifted" A+ student with a large flaw for people). These two teens have but 1 thing alike, they are both made of molecules. After Stewart's mom dies of cancer and Ashley's dad announces that he's gay, both Stewart's dad an We Are All Made of Molecules is a heart warming tale of unsuspected friendships and the true meaning of family.... This book is told in two different perspectives. The first is of Ashley (a typical fashion diva and a school wide popular girl) and the second is of Stewart ( a "gifted" A+ student with a large flaw for people). These two teens have but 1 thing alike, they are both made of molecules. After Stewart's mom dies of cancer and Ashley's dad announces that he's gay, both Stewart's dad and Ashley's mom are left alone and heartbroken. Unavoidably, they fall in love. That's when they decide to take the next step and move in together. What was Stewart's response? He was eighty nine point nine percent excited. Though leaving the house where he lived with his mom hurts him, he tries to be positive and think of his new family and sister that he's always wanted. What was Ashley's response? She was 110 percent horrified. She can't risk her place on the social ladder by being seen with that nerd! However, they soon learn to apreciate each other. When Ashley starts dating her all time crush Jared, everything seems well. Though Stewart senses that something it not right. Anyhow, Ashley refuses to listen to him and pays the price when things get out of hand at a party. That is when Jarded shows his true intentions and Ashley's only hope is Stewart. I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a humorous though deep book that leaves you with a new prespective on life. I also loved this book because I could really make a connection to those mixed emotions that Stewart and Ashley expirienced. It was my first time reading a book in this genre, so even though I cannot relate this book to any other book or sires, I highly encourage fellow readers to give it a try. This book made me feel a rush of emotion. I felt anger towards Ashley's negativity towards Stewart, though at the same time felt empathy at how she really felt about her parents seperation. It also really gives you a insiders prespective on the "sweet and sour" feelings that occure when two families merge. Anyhow, depite all its amazing writing and story plot, I do not recommend this book to people that do not like to hear curse words in books or are sensitive in subjects like gay family members. It is the only complaint I had about this amazing book and can't wait to read some more of Susin Nielsen's work.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Megan G

    Ashley and Stewart are nothing alike. Ashley is a social genius. She is at the top rung of the “Social Ladder” and is good at everything when it comes to popularity. Her only flaw: she’s just stupid. She doesn’t know the difference between the words “emancipated” and “unconstipated” and doesn’t seem to care. Stewart, on the other hand, is a genius. He can take everyday problems and turn them into math easily. Although he’s so smart, something he’s not so good at is being social. He gets teased a Ashley and Stewart are nothing alike. Ashley is a social genius. She is at the top rung of the “Social Ladder” and is good at everything when it comes to popularity. Her only flaw: she’s just stupid. She doesn’t know the difference between the words “emancipated” and “unconstipated” and doesn’t seem to care. Stewart, on the other hand, is a genius. He can take everyday problems and turn them into math easily. Although he’s so smart, something he’s not so good at is being social. He gets teased all the time, and he can’t stand up for himself or know why he’s being picked on. But one day, their worlds collide when Stewart and his dad move in with Ashley and her mom. Stewart is trying to be 89.9 percent happy- he’s always wanted a sister. But Ashley is absolutely horrified. She already has to hide the fact why her dad moved away, and now that "Spewart" (his new nickname, thanks to Ashley) has moved in, her social life could be destroyed. They only have one thing in common: they are both made of molecules. Can that be enough for them to get along? I didn't really enjoy this book because I felt like the idea of the story could be written so much better. The ending also didn't turn out the way I expected it to. This book is written in two different people's points of view: Stewart's and Ashley's. I feel like I related more to Stewart's point of view because I have experienced what it is like to move from the home you've lived in all of your life. We Are All Made Of Molecules has a lot in common with the book Wonder by R.J. Palacio because both of the novels are told from different points of view. People who enjoy realistic fiction novels will really like this book. I hope you enjoy this book more than I did!

  19. 4 out of 5

    A Canadian Girl

    Using the themes of death and divorce, Susin Nielsen’s We Are All Made of Molecules explores how families can change and adapt. Unfortunately, my enjoyment of the book was tempered by: 1) the character of Ashley and 2) the use of rape as a plot device. Told from the alternating points of Stewart and Ashley, We Are All Made of Molecules chronicles what happens when two families decide to merge. Although I thought both Stewart and Ashley seemed very stereotypical, Stewart was at least a pretty dece Using the themes of death and divorce, Susin Nielsen’s We Are All Made of Molecules explores how families can change and adapt. Unfortunately, my enjoyment of the book was tempered by: 1) the character of Ashley and 2) the use of rape as a plot device. Told from the alternating points of Stewart and Ashley, We Are All Made of Molecules chronicles what happens when two families decide to merge. Although I thought both Stewart and Ashley seemed very stereotypical, Stewart was at least a pretty decent character. Ashley, on the other hand, was not only mean and constantly putting others down, but Nielsen chose to highlight that Ashley wasn’t as smart as Stewart by having Ashley continually mix up words (e.g. using unconstipated instead of emancipated, etc.). This drove me crazy! Another issue that I had with We Are All Made of Molecules was that Ashley wasn’t almost raped once but twice in the book - just so that she could experience some character growth! Also, nobody experienced any major consequences in the aftermath of either situation. It’s just too bad that a topic like rape was used as a plot device, and wasn’t handled more sensitively.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    It would be so easy to say that Stewart was adorable and Ashley was horrible, but it's not as black-and-white as that. Although Ashley is unlikeable because of her reaction to Stewart and his dad, Stewart isn't perfect in comparison. I really liked that this was dual perspective first-person, and the family dynamic was so unique and fun. I'm so pleased that story all about family are out there, and this has definitely encouraged me to find more of them! It would be so easy to say that Stewart was adorable and Ashley was horrible, but it's not as black-and-white as that. Although Ashley is unlikeable because of her reaction to Stewart and his dad, Stewart isn't perfect in comparison. I really liked that this was dual perspective first-person, and the family dynamic was so unique and fun. I'm so pleased that story all about family are out there, and this has definitely encouraged me to find more of them!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    I actually went into We Are All Made of Molecules without any expectations, and blindly. I read maybe one review for it when it was being published, and I thought "Well if it's good then I'll add it to the TBR!". So in conclusion, this wasn't on my highly anticipated list or anything! However, even with saying that, I felt that the novel fell short a little for me. Stewart was by far my favorite character. Even though it's 13, he's more intelligent than the others in his grade, which is why he wa I actually went into We Are All Made of Molecules without any expectations, and blindly. I read maybe one review for it when it was being published, and I thought "Well if it's good then I'll add it to the TBR!". So in conclusion, this wasn't on my highly anticipated list or anything! However, even with saying that, I felt that the novel fell short a little for me. Stewart was by far my favorite character. Even though it's 13, he's more intelligent than the others in his grade, which is why he was attending Little Genius Academy, until his mother passed away from cancer. Within two pages of the book, I was also killed by this quote: (Taken from an uncorrected proof) "You think you're pregnant?" I heard my dad say. "I do" I couldn't help myself. "FINALLY!" I yelled through the vent. "BEST BIRTHDAY PRESENT EVER!" The next day, Mom made an appointment with the doctor. But it wasn't a baby growing inside her. It was cancer. What else, oh Stewart's father starts dating, and both of them later move in with Ashley and her mother. And that's kind of when everything starts going downhill. I really, really, don't like Ashley How old was she? 14? And she literally acted like a 10 year old for most of the novel. She was incredibly inconsiderate of everyone, her father, her mother, Stewart, his father, and her "friends" at school. She was selfish and mean, and only cared about the social ladder. And unfortunately, to her Stewart was only a hindrance and not a step brother. Fortunately she does develop throughout the novel, being nicer to Stewart and changing her ways, but her initial impression just stuck with me, and I couldn't think of her any better than before. The overall message is great, but I just wasn't moved by anything It's not like I'm expecting ALL THE FEELS from every book, but it's just that after reading so many books, the plot can get dull and bland. Even though We Are All Made of Molecules discussed topics such as bullying, LGBTQ, and being different from normal, nothing really stuck out to me. Though I do have to applaud the author for tackling the issue of being uncomfortable around someone, especially in a sexual way.  Overall, We Are All Made of Molecules was a quick read, and I enjoyed reading about Stewart and his friends, but not so much of Ashley and Jared (ugh). Either way, I would still recommend this to someone who enjoys contemporary more than I do.

  22. 4 out of 5

    CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian

    A moving and funny Canadian #YA #audiobook set in Vancouver and North Vancouver told from the perspectives of two VERY different characters who have become step-siblings: Stewart, a sweet neurodivergent 13-year-old nerd and Ashley, a superficial 14-year-old caught up in mean girl culture. While Stewart is instantly lovable, Ashley is pretty awful (although still empathetic). But she's also the character who grows the most as the story deals with parental death, sexual assault, and a gay dad. Gre A moving and funny Canadian #YA #audiobook set in Vancouver and North Vancouver told from the perspectives of two VERY different characters who have become step-siblings: Stewart, a sweet neurodivergent 13-year-old nerd and Ashley, a superficial 14-year-old caught up in mean girl culture. While Stewart is instantly lovable, Ashley is pretty awful (although still empathetic). But she's also the character who grows the most as the story deals with parental death, sexual assault, and a gay dad. Great as an audiobook!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kasia

    Poor qualify of writing but touches sensitive subjects. Easy reading for teens.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    When this book arrived in the mail for me for possible review, I had no idea what it was about. I hadn't ever heard of it before, but it looked cute and quick, so I decided to give it a try. Stewart and Ashley couldn't be more different. Stewart is brilliant but socially awkward 13-year-old while Ashley is the 14-year-old queen bee at school but not so smart academically. When Stewart's dad decides it's time to move in with his girlfriend, who just so happens to be Ashley's mom, Ashley is anyth When this book arrived in the mail for me for possible review, I had no idea what it was about. I hadn't ever heard of it before, but it looked cute and quick, so I decided to give it a try. Stewart and Ashley couldn't be more different. Stewart is brilliant but socially awkward 13-year-old while Ashley is the 14-year-old queen bee at school but not so smart academically. When Stewart's dad decides it's time to move in with his girlfriend, who just so happens to be Ashley's mom, Ashley is anything but thrilled. Ashley is still trying to understand how to feel about why her dad divorced her mom while trying to hold on to her reputation at school. Stewart may not be Mr. Popular, but he does his best to do the right thing and show Ashley how they truly can be a family. Wow, this book was definitely not what I was expecting. First off, Stewart is so freaking adorable and he definitely made this book as enjoyable as it was. I loved how his brain worked and how he was so straightforward and just wanted to do the right thing. I wasn't a huge fan of Ashley and how over-the-top popular girl she was. Her thought process seemed a bit too juvenile at times for a high school sophomore and I just hated how she treated her "best friend" Lauren. At times I just rolled my eyes at how unbelievable her character was in her thought process when trying to maintain her popularity. There were parts, though, that were very relatable and relevant in today's society, like her dilemma with dating a "popular" guy when he didn't treat her right and dealing with her dad coming out. I definitely think that this book tackled some serious issues in a pretty amazing way. First off, Ashley's dad is gay and the only one who can't accept that about him is Ashely. She won't even tell her friends because she's scared of what they'll say. Then, there's the whole issue with Jared and how he treated Ashley. She deals with pressure to be someone she's not and trying to be who everyone expects her to be in her ideal view of life. Then, there's Stewart. I just wanted to give him a huge hug! He lost his mom almost two years ago and is still trying to deal with life without her, and then he's bullied at school because he's smaller, socially awkward, and thinks differently than everyone else. I HATED it when he was bullied, especially when Ashley was also mean to him and refused to help him. Stewart had such a heart, though, and really did his best to make his new family work and make the world right. Overall, this book had some strong messages and adorable characters. Ashley was a bit too exaggerated for my liking, but I think that Stewart's character definitely made up for that. I would say that this read more as a middle grade book, but I really enjoyed how Susin Nielsen was able to write about such heavy topics in a very quirky, lovable way.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Layla (Between the Lines)

    “Right now, as I’m talking to you, you’re probably picking up a few Stewart molecules and vice versa.” My heart swells for Stewart. To put it in his own words, he is a "quality human being". The fact that he refers to his parents as quality human beings makes him even more of a quality human being. I just love that. Stewart is earnest and matter-of-fact and just plain charming. You probably never got to know him in school. Ashley is attractive (and vain) and places no real value on friendship “Right now, as I’m talking to you, you’re probably picking up a few Stewart molecules and vice versa.” My heart swells for Stewart. To put it in his own words, he is a "quality human being". The fact that he refers to his parents as quality human beings makes him even more of a quality human being. I just love that. Stewart is earnest and matter-of-fact and just plain charming. You probably never got to know him in school. Ashley is attractive (and vain) and places no real value on friendship, or family, for that matter. And I think it's safe to say that we've all been friends with an Ashley. Or a dozen. Heaven knows I have. Of course, this would not be a good book if mistakes weren't made and learned from. I assumed this was a middle grade book, however, there were some very serious topics being discussed. This book is able to talk about death, divorce, homophobia, bullying, and sexual harassment in a way that everyone can understand. It's important for youth to read about these things to learn about what is and is not okay. On that note, I really enjoyed the writing style. It was quick and witty and just how I remember feeling when I was 13-years-old. Needless to say, Stewart's intelligence comes across in his thoughts, and his way of looking at the world--at people--is spectacular. He sees everything for what it is. Ashley's P.O.V. was entertaining to say the least, often misplacing words like "emancipated" with "unconstipated". Divorcing from your parents and cleansing your intestines are two very different things. Or maybe it's not, haha! My favourite part of this novel was the fact that it takes place in Vancouver, my hometown. It's surreal reading about streets and trains that you take every day. It made the story that much more real to me. 4.5 stars because we are all made of molecules. The sooner we all realize that, the sooner we can all accept each other.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Taylor B

    We are All Made of Molecules is about a teenage girl named Ashley and a teenage boy named Stewart. Ashley's dad left Ashley and her mom, Caroline, when he realized he was gay. Stewart's mom died of cancer a few years ago. When Caroline and Stewart's dad, Leonard, find that they are both single, they start dating. They both decided they should move in with each other. For Stewart, this is awesome news because he has always wanted a sister. Ashley is a different story. She, being on the top of th We are All Made of Molecules is about a teenage girl named Ashley and a teenage boy named Stewart. Ashley's dad left Ashley and her mom, Caroline, when he realized he was gay. Stewart's mom died of cancer a few years ago. When Caroline and Stewart's dad, Leonard, find that they are both single, they start dating. They both decided they should move in with each other. For Stewart, this is awesome news because he has always wanted a sister. Ashley is a different story. She, being on the top of the social ladder, does not want to be seen with the "freak". Stewart is forced to move schools to be with Ashley, which is good for him. He doesn't make friends very quickly. In Phys. Ed he meets a huge jerk, Jared. On the bright side, he meets his first crush! Ashley is so embarrassed to be living with "him". She already has too much to worry about! She and her best friend, Lauren, are having a frenemy type relationship because Lauren wants to be at the top of the social ladder. Ashley is also going to go out with the hottest guy in the school, also Jared. How will Jared treat Ashley? Will Stewart ever make any friends? Will Ashley forgive her dad? Is the family going to work out? Will Stewart ever gain Ashley's trust? This book was okay. I liked how it had two people's perspectives. It helps you understand what is happening better. What I didn't like about the book is that is was very inappropriate. It had quite a few bad words and it talked a lot about very mature topics. It made me feel sad, grossed out, and awkward. You may enjoy this book if you like realistic fiction, romance, or young adult books. You may also like this book if you liked Wonder beacause the format is very similar. This book was not my favorite but I hope you will enjoy it!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carole-Ann

    Another one of the Costa finalists :) , this time dealing with difficult things: death of a parent, homophobia, bullying, divorce, merging two/three families together, adolescence, etc. I usually don't read contemporary stuff because I find life depressing enough as it is, but I tried this one because I thought I might like Stewart's "gifted" viewpoint. And I did! I enjoyed his reflections on his mother (bravely done), and his propensity for making (quite clever) jokes. But his 'voice' came over Another one of the Costa finalists :) , this time dealing with difficult things: death of a parent, homophobia, bullying, divorce, merging two/three families together, adolescence, etc. I usually don't read contemporary stuff because I find life depressing enough as it is, but I tried this one because I thought I might like Stewart's "gifted" viewpoint. And I did! I enjoyed his reflections on his mother (bravely done), and his propensity for making (quite clever) jokes. But his 'voice' came over younger than his 13 years. One would think that being "gifted" would make him sound more mature, but this was not the case. However, I found him completely likable. That couldn't be said for Ashley, the 14 yr old girl who Stewart has to live with now that his father and her mother are an 'item'. I found her selfish, and ignorant, and very rude at times, with no consideration whatever for anyone else around her. What happened to turn her around at the end still struck me as being selfish - aka wanting to be 'seen' to be doing the 'right' thing. So, I was not particularly happy with the rather boringly-ordinary ending; hence only 3 *s Interesting; enjoyable in parts (OK some of Stewart's jokes made me grin!); but fairly standard stuff otherwise.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    6.5 out of 10 Cute, insightful, humorous yet poignant, I enjoyed this book quite a bit. Stewart was, by far, my favourite character as a result of his fantastic mind and anti-social skills, and OMG he was adowable awwwwwwww. Ashley had a very nice theoretical arc, yet I felt it wasn't executed at its upmost capability. I liked her, she was not taught differently when she was young. I felt pathos towards her when her father came out. All the questions whe was contemplating were all valid such 6.5 out of 10 Cute, insightful, humorous yet poignant, I enjoyed this book quite a bit. Stewart was, by far, my favourite character as a result of his fantastic mind and anti-social skills, and OMG he was adowable awwwwwwww. Ashley had a very nice theoretical arc, yet I felt it wasn't executed at its upmost capability. I liked her, she was not taught differently when she was young. I felt pathos towards her when her father came out. All the questions whe was contemplating were all valid such as "Did he really love me?" etc. However, I had difficulty liking her until the end, which was probably the author's intention - her bullying and really horrifying remarks of other people kind of disgusted me. I wish this book was longer because not only her arc be more powerful, but the overall resolution could be longer, because I felt the ending was extremely rushed. I also found this a tad unrealistic - I don't know why, but I did. The LGBTQI themes were nice, and the messages a bit cliché yet important. A novel about family, loss, suffering and hope "We are all made of molecules"

  29. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    This is Young Adult/Contemporary. I'm a little conflicted about this one. I liked some of this, and yet there were some things that seemed like it was too glossy. But it was sweet in places. It also had some pertinent messages about truth, forgiveness, coping and moving on. This was a solid 4 stars in the beginning, but I deducted a star towards the end. First, I liked the humor for the most part. It had me laughing, but some attempts fell flat. I also liked Stewart and Ashley. They were portraye This is Young Adult/Contemporary. I'm a little conflicted about this one. I liked some of this, and yet there were some things that seemed like it was too glossy. But it was sweet in places. It also had some pertinent messages about truth, forgiveness, coping and moving on. This was a solid 4 stars in the beginning, but I deducted a star towards the end. First, I liked the humor for the most part. It had me laughing, but some attempts fell flat. I also liked Stewart and Ashley. They were portrayed as polar opposites in ALL things but I enjoyed the journey as they found common ground. It was entertaining. There were some serious themes that felt a little glossy. Most of the ugliness of 'humans behaving badly' was vaguely implied. Some of this was begging for more detail, or maybe that was just me. Also the ending seemed anti-climatic. It ended and I wondered "What? This is it?" I didn't get that 'satisfied' feel. So three stars.

  30. 4 out of 5

    B.A. Wilson

    This YA contemporary novel was unexpectedly good. It has two very unique POVs (a stepbrother and stepsister), and I enjoyed the contrast between the two. Overall, it's an enjoyable story. I just wanted a little bit more from the plot and the ending, but as far as voice and character development go, this was spot on. Pages: 256 This YA contemporary novel was unexpectedly good. It has two very unique POVs (a stepbrother and stepsister), and I enjoyed the contrast between the two. Overall, it's an enjoyable story. I just wanted a little bit more from the plot and the ending, but as far as voice and character development go, this was spot on. Pages: 256

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.