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When Augustus (r. 27 BC-AD 14) came to the throne as the first emperor of Rome, he began to bring order to the chaos that almost 20 years of civil war had wrought. Areas that had been added piecemeal to the Roman Republic, from Spain and Gaul to Dalmatia, needed to be restructured as provinces of the empire, while in the East, Augustus reorganised Asia Minor and Syria, and When Augustus (r. 27 BC-AD 14) came to the throne as the first emperor of Rome, he began to bring order to the chaos that almost 20 years of civil war had wrought. Areas that had been added piecemeal to the Roman Republic, from Spain and Gaul to Dalmatia, needed to be restructured as provinces of the empire, while in the East, Augustus reorganised Asia Minor and Syria, and held the Parthian empire in check with cunning diplomacy. The foundations of the empire were thus laid by Augustus, and his aspirations for world conquest were passed on to his successors, who would strive to defend, expand and consolidate the empire after his death. Under Trajan (AD 98-117) the empire reached its largest extent - some 6.5 million square kilometres. Its presence in much of present-day Western and Central Europe gave the area a lasting legacy in a range of areas, from legal matters to languages and from architecture to religious belief. In this book ancient-warfare specialist Duncan Campbell explores the course of the wars that ensued as successive emperors sought to extend the empire, from Claudius' conquest of Britannia (AD 43) and Domitian's campaigns on the Rhine (AD 83) and the Danube (AD 89, 92), through Trajan's Dacian Wars (AD 101-03, 105-06) and Parthian War (AD 117), to Marcus Aurelius' Marcomannic Wars (AD 167-75, 177-80), as well as the Jewish Wars (AD 66-74 and AD 132-36). The period covered in this book ends with the consolidation of the Roman frontiers along the Rhine and Danube - 'this far and no further' - and uneasy peace with the Parthian empire, wracked by its own internal troubles. The murder of the emperor Pertinax in AD 193 was to usher in a period of instability and civil war, dominated by the mighty Septimius Severus (r. AD 193-212). This book provides a summary of the strengths, limitations and evolving character of the Roman army during the first two centuries AD, as well as those of the forces of Rome's enemies across the Rhine and Danube in Germany and Romania, and in the East, in the form of the Parthian empire of Iraq/Iran. The characters and achievements of the soldiers and civilians who fought Rome's enemies and administered the new provinces carved out in war are brought to life in vivid detail. Fully illustrated with photographs depicting the emperors, their armies and enemies, and the remains of Roman fortifications and public buildings, plus informative full-colour maps, this is the epic story of the wars waged by a succession of emperors during the period in which Imperial Rome reached its zenith.


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When Augustus (r. 27 BC-AD 14) came to the throne as the first emperor of Rome, he began to bring order to the chaos that almost 20 years of civil war had wrought. Areas that had been added piecemeal to the Roman Republic, from Spain and Gaul to Dalmatia, needed to be restructured as provinces of the empire, while in the East, Augustus reorganised Asia Minor and Syria, and When Augustus (r. 27 BC-AD 14) came to the throne as the first emperor of Rome, he began to bring order to the chaos that almost 20 years of civil war had wrought. Areas that had been added piecemeal to the Roman Republic, from Spain and Gaul to Dalmatia, needed to be restructured as provinces of the empire, while in the East, Augustus reorganised Asia Minor and Syria, and held the Parthian empire in check with cunning diplomacy. The foundations of the empire were thus laid by Augustus, and his aspirations for world conquest were passed on to his successors, who would strive to defend, expand and consolidate the empire after his death. Under Trajan (AD 98-117) the empire reached its largest extent - some 6.5 million square kilometres. Its presence in much of present-day Western and Central Europe gave the area a lasting legacy in a range of areas, from legal matters to languages and from architecture to religious belief. In this book ancient-warfare specialist Duncan Campbell explores the course of the wars that ensued as successive emperors sought to extend the empire, from Claudius' conquest of Britannia (AD 43) and Domitian's campaigns on the Rhine (AD 83) and the Danube (AD 89, 92), through Trajan's Dacian Wars (AD 101-03, 105-06) and Parthian War (AD 117), to Marcus Aurelius' Marcomannic Wars (AD 167-75, 177-80), as well as the Jewish Wars (AD 66-74 and AD 132-36). The period covered in this book ends with the consolidation of the Roman frontiers along the Rhine and Danube - 'this far and no further' - and uneasy peace with the Parthian empire, wracked by its own internal troubles. The murder of the emperor Pertinax in AD 193 was to usher in a period of instability and civil war, dominated by the mighty Septimius Severus (r. AD 193-212). This book provides a summary of the strengths, limitations and evolving character of the Roman army during the first two centuries AD, as well as those of the forces of Rome's enemies across the Rhine and Danube in Germany and Romania, and in the East, in the form of the Parthian empire of Iraq/Iran. The characters and achievements of the soldiers and civilians who fought Rome's enemies and administered the new provinces carved out in war are brought to life in vivid detail. Fully illustrated with photographs depicting the emperors, their armies and enemies, and the remains of Roman fortifications and public buildings, plus informative full-colour maps, this is the epic story of the wars waged by a succession of emperors during the period in which Imperial Rome reached its zenith.

35 review for The Rise of Imperial Rome AD 14-193

  1. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    In AD 14, Augustus Caesar passed, having amassed all the power of the Roman Republic into his hands. He had ended 20 tortuous years of Civil War across the the Empire (Marc Antony? Cleopatra? you remember) and given the people Peace- they just lost their votes and powerful senate-Emperors would rule the Empire now. The next 180 years would see the ascendant Empire, for although Augustus had admonished his descendants to be happy with the empire As it was- Emperors would keep adding a province he In AD 14, Augustus Caesar passed, having amassed all the power of the Roman Republic into his hands. He had ended 20 tortuous years of Civil War across the the Empire (Marc Antony? Cleopatra? you remember) and given the people Peace- they just lost their votes and powerful senate-Emperors would rule the Empire now. The next 180 years would see the ascendant Empire, for although Augustus had admonished his descendants to be happy with the empire As it was- Emperors would keep adding a province here and taking over a neighbouring kingdom there- always with an eye to the "Security of the Empire". Duncan Campbell, the author here, uses the Osprey Essential Histories format, with its 96 pages to take the reader on a whirlwind tour of an era that Gibbon's "Rise And Fall ...." fills 200 plus pages. It's fast and fun- but what Duncan has to leave out is the Economic/Market conditions underlying the many wars that expanding Rome fought. For instance the constant friction with the Parthian Persians was not just Martial Jockeying- the Spice routes to India and China required the Romans to compete for control of the eastern reaches as far as Baghdad sometimes- they were just too lucrative for the Romans to resist. This is the period of Rome we remember most clearly. Christianity a minor sect of Jewry, The Germans still kept beyond the Rhine, The Legionaries in Kilts and leggings, the helmets with the ring on top, and the many Auxiliaries drawn from Africa, Spain and Anatolia. Emperors like Tiberias, Nero, Caligula, Claudius, Domitian and Trajan and Hadrian - the ones everyone reads about in school. Wars against the Parthians, Dacians, Frisians, Thracians, Chattan, Marcomannii and of course the Jews. Campbell takes us through it all - but at such speed that it's really an Amuse Buche- almost guaranteed to interest you in further reading as much as answering your curiosity. All along, you get good maps and Colour Photos of all sorts of Roman Art and artifacts to support the narrative, in the typical Osprey Style. With no real adult themes save greed and avarice, and no overly frank wound descriptions, this is a fine text for an interested Junior reader over bout 11 years. For the Gamer/Modeller/Military Enthusiast this is great stuff. Again- this is the kind of book you can give that D&D/Warhammer player interested in historical Ancients in order to bring them up to speed on the Romans and their wars in a few days. You can also find ideas for Campaigns and Scenarios here. I took a full Semester Class on this period, so I can't help but think of the many things Campbell left out in order to fit the format- but this period was enormously nuanced- and 96 pages is not really enough. Campbell really does as best he can- but I'm sure any reader will soon be looking for more on this age-its so fascinating.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Declan Waters

    The Imperial Roman Empire which followed the death of Julius Caesar is one with much intrigue, ebbs and flows (including the invasion and settlement of Brittania). This book is part of the Essential Histories series from Osprey but they've bitten off too much of history... or tried to explain in slightly too much detail. Names of provinces, generals, and emperors abound and fly about such that I struggled to stay fully aware of it all. Also the author clearly thinks the military honours received The Imperial Roman Empire which followed the death of Julius Caesar is one with much intrigue, ebbs and flows (including the invasion and settlement of Brittania). This book is part of the Essential Histories series from Osprey but they've bitten off too much of history... or tried to explain in slightly too much detail. Names of provinces, generals, and emperors abound and fly about such that I struggled to stay fully aware of it all. Also the author clearly thinks the military honours received are important, but probably didn't need to be mentioned in quite so much detail throughout. That said a good addition to the series, and a good overview of this period of Roman history

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bruinrefugee

    A pretty good overview of the expansion and conflicts that Rome experienced as part of the not-quite "Pax Romana" Worth a read. A pretty good overview of the expansion and conflicts that Rome experienced as part of the not-quite "Pax Romana" Worth a read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gerry Patterson

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristopher Swinson

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rizwan Niaz Raiyan

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael Heitmanek

  8. 5 out of 5

    Roy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bart De

  10. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marcelo

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  13. 4 out of 5

    Guglielmo Bertani

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mr. Makaveli

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Wendy Skultety (gimmethatbook.com)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  17. 5 out of 5

    Loïc

  18. 5 out of 5

    T.A. Uner

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Sipila

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tim Brown

  21. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Somers

  24. 4 out of 5

    John

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jason Carter

  26. 4 out of 5

    Arthur Solecki

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  28. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Agemian

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dеnnis

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cb

  31. 4 out of 5

    Michael Cleaton

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

  33. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  34. 5 out of 5

    Sandeep Mohan

  35. 4 out of 5

    Ali Al Zadjali

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