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Zhirrzh alien Searcher Thrr-gilag is disgraced, his engagement imperilled. He is a target of hidden and powerful forces seeking to remake Zhirrzh society in their own merciless image. His only hope is to prove authorities wrong: Humans did not start the war.


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Zhirrzh alien Searcher Thrr-gilag is disgraced, his engagement imperilled. He is a target of hidden and powerful forces seeking to remake Zhirrzh society in their own merciless image. His only hope is to prove authorities wrong: Humans did not start the war.

30 review for Conquerors' Heritage

  1. 4 out of 5

    Troy G

    With this book Timothy Zahn accomplishes several things few authors are capable of. 1) He write a book from the point of view of an alien living on an alien world without any character to act as a audiance representative that learns about the world and culture along with us. 2) He makes an extremely alien culture and government seem mundane. Aliens have to do paperwork too. 3) He advances the story of the series without relying on the characters of the first book in a way that feels mostly natura With this book Timothy Zahn accomplishes several things few authors are capable of. 1) He write a book from the point of view of an alien living on an alien world without any character to act as a audiance representative that learns about the world and culture along with us. 2) He makes an extremely alien culture and government seem mundane. Aliens have to do paperwork too. 3) He advances the story of the series without relying on the characters of the first book in a way that feels mostly natural, and isn't marred by our desire to get back to the characters of the first book. I am really really impressed by this book, and while I enjoyed reading it less than the first one, it made my enjoyment of the finale so many times greater. Stories that show conflict from both sides, and both points of view are almost always stronger than stories with a more one sided focus, and with this book Zahn shows that he is not only willing to offer a token effort to show opposing points of view, he wants to offer equal time. You should read it if you read "Conqueror Pride".

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mel Anie

    Rating: 5 Mini review: Conqueror's Heritage is the 2nd book in The Conquerors Saga. This book tells the story from the perspective of Zhirrzh people, mostly Thrr-gilag, while learning the truth behind who really started the war. I dare to say that this book was way better than the 1st one. Easier to read and more interesting. Also funnier and surprising. I really enjoyed reading this book from the perspective of Zhirrzhs. Differences between characters were really entertaining. I could easi Rating: 5 Mini review: Conqueror's Heritage is the 2nd book in The Conquerors Saga. This book tells the story from the perspective of Zhirrzh people, mostly Thrr-gilag, while learning the truth behind who really started the war. I dare to say that this book was way better than the 1st one. Easier to read and more interesting. Also funnier and surprising. I really enjoyed reading this book from the perspective of Zhirrzhs. Differences between characters were really entertaining. I could easily decide if I liked one person and disliked another one - this is definitely a plus for me. I also really liked the whole idea of fsss being thoroughly explained. Elders system also made really good impression on me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    SciFiOne

    (Update July 2013: The Conqueror's series is one of the most impressive stories I have ever read (I've graded ~2000). Although not all the books earned an A grade on first read because of the complexity, the overall series is a strong grade A. I suspect each story will earn a grade A on second read. The story includes more characters, situations, interactions, species, and concepts than most authors deal with in a lifetime. Yet the author manages to keep it all straight for the reader, an impres (Update July 2013: The Conqueror's series is one of the most impressive stories I have ever read (I've graded ~2000). Although not all the books earned an A grade on first read because of the complexity, the overall series is a strong grade A. I suspect each story will earn a grade A on second read. The story includes more characters, situations, interactions, species, and concepts than most authors deal with in a lifetime. Yet the author manages to keep it all straight for the reader, an impressive major accomplishment. In all this there are only two major villains, both politicians - very interesting. This definitely deserves a second read.) 2013 grade B. This is a technically difficult read. It is entirely told from the alien's point of view. All their names are hard to pronounce, multi-syllable, and in the format last-first - which means you do not know who is talking until the second or third syllable. When English dialog is present it is missing words and parts of words that the aliens cannot translate. The substituted word is "something" every time. At least the aliens should be able to recognize different sounds. The result is often gibberish to the reader. I found it made no difference whether I understood or not and since it slowed me down, I started skipping them. It didn't make any difference in my understanding of the content. The author also digresses off the main story line to explain the alien culture. Not only was much of this boring, it was also unnecessary. Maybe that's because I have read about 3000 novels but I started speed reading through these and had no problem understanding the content. Book two in a series of three. The story basically ends on a cliff hanger, although not a major one. Never the less, I advise not reading it or book one until you have the last book in hand because in book three you have to keep track of all the characters from book one and two. Given those difficulties, I still liked it. .

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    I'm so glad that I'm done with this blessed book! I dragged my way through it and to be honest, really ended up super speed- read my way through the last 100 pages. This genre is really not my thing and now I can say it with certainty having just read a decently rated book in the science fiction/ fantasy/ space setting genre. I hate completely made up worlds, people, language, religion, etc,,,, I thnk it's because I don't have anywhere to put the ideas n my head because they are obviously so for I'm so glad that I'm done with this blessed book! I dragged my way through it and to be honest, really ended up super speed- read my way through the last 100 pages. This genre is really not my thing and now I can say it with certainty having just read a decently rated book in the science fiction/ fantasy/ space setting genre. I hate completely made up worlds, people, language, religion, etc,,,, I thnk it's because I don't have anywhere to put the ideas n my head because they are obviously so foreign to me. My brain just can't deal with it and it is extremely frustrating to me! I can't even give a decent summary because I just didn't get it. This may be a really great book for science fiction fans but for me it was a complete dud! 1 star!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Koan

    Science Fiction can be a hard genre to read. It can be especially hard if there are a lot of alien names and words used. But what if the entire book is from the aliens point of view, on alien planets, with minimal references to the Humans from the first book? Well, Timothy Zahn set out to do that. And it works! The first thing I'll say about this book is that it is ambitious. It takes a drastic turn from the first book in the series and brings you to all new places and settings and characters, and Science Fiction can be a hard genre to read. It can be especially hard if there are a lot of alien names and words used. But what if the entire book is from the aliens point of view, on alien planets, with minimal references to the Humans from the first book? Well, Timothy Zahn set out to do that. And it works! The first thing I'll say about this book is that it is ambitious. It takes a drastic turn from the first book in the series and brings you to all new places and settings and characters, and expects you to remember what happened before as little tidbits of the previous book slip into this one. I would never expect to like let alone be able to read such a book, but it was surprisingly entertaining. Another thing that was interesting was the naming convention. All the Zhirrzh names are hyphenated, with the family name first(our last name) and their individual name last(our first name). This was a difficult concept to understand, but I eventually was able to not only understand it, but root and love the characters in the book. Another thing that Zahn does really well is write families. I believe this is one of the reasons that his original Star Wars novels were so successful. In the first book of this series, he focused on the Cavanagh family, while this book focuses on the "Thrr" family. I found "Thrr-Gilag" to be very compelling and interesting and found "Thrr-Mezaz" to be also very well written and interesting. I also found the culture of the Zhirrzh to be interesting and unique. The whole "Elder" concept was fun and different and provided an element of Fantasy into the mix that I enjoyed. The concept of the Pyramid's was a little confusing, but I eventually understood it by the end of the book. The politics of this book are also interesting. I would never expect the main part of a book about aliens, featuring alien politics to be the most interesting part of the book. In regards to the Overclan Prime, I went from loving him to hating him to not being sure by the end. He was complex and kept me as a reader on my toes. I think I know his motives, but I'm not entirely sure. Also, Cvv-Panav was an effective "villain"("Foil" might be a better word though) and was really intimidating. The entire plotline with Prr't-Zevisti was uninteresting to me(and that was the section featuring the only Humans in the book!) largely because almost every other human word was "something", since it was from the alien's point of view and they don't understand everything yet. However, the reveal at the end of the book with his character was both shocking and expected, it was just surprising enough to catch me off guard, but didn't seem implausable, and it makes me view the whole story in a whole new way. On a small note, I really liked the character of Klnn-Vavgi, particularly when he was extremely loyal to Thrr-Mezaz. He could have easily worked behind his back to mutiny, but he was respectful and loyal to his superior and that was refreshing compared to many other books/stories that we get today. Overall, I really, really liked this book. It was so different and fun and I expected it to be difficult and it really wasn't. I think I enjoyed the first book a little more because of the character work with the Cavanaghs, but this book is more important for the reasons mentioned above. I'll give it the same rating of 8.5 out of 10! Well done Zahn. I can't wait to read the conclusion!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Don't you hate the second book of a three (or more) part series? Zahn wrote an excellent story, but it didn't go anywhere. I suspect that all the major plot points were at least hinted at in Conquerors' Prideand everything will be resolved in Conquerors' Legacy. Don't waste your time on this book unless you happen to like the way Zahn writes, which I do . . . but not that much. Don't you hate the second book of a three (or more) part series? Zahn wrote an excellent story, but it didn't go anywhere. I suspect that all the major plot points were at least hinted at in Conquerors' Prideand everything will be resolved in Conquerors' Legacy. Don't waste your time on this book unless you happen to like the way Zahn writes, which I do . . . but not that much.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Luke Zwanziger

    While not as engaging as the first book of this trilogy, still was sufficiently interesting. The book picks up at the end of the previous, but with a unique twist, being told from the alien's point of view. The twist of the trilogy is relatively apparent, but the intent is for the reader to know and build tension as the information is not readily apparent to the majority of the characters. It is a good read for the space opera genre. Probably nothing that will blow you away, but a good well writ While not as engaging as the first book of this trilogy, still was sufficiently interesting. The book picks up at the end of the previous, but with a unique twist, being told from the alien's point of view. The twist of the trilogy is relatively apparent, but the intent is for the reader to know and build tension as the information is not readily apparent to the majority of the characters. It is a good read for the space opera genre. Probably nothing that will blow you away, but a good well written building of an alien culture and politics. Looking forward to the next book to see how it all wraps up.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Luc

    Thrr-gilag is in trouble. Despite the Conquerors' despicable surprise attack, the Zhirrzh navy was able to fight back, and they even took a prisoner! Thrr-gilag was sent to interrogate the prisoner, figure out where these "humans" come from, and why they attacked without provocation. But before he can get those answers, his prisoner (Pheylan Cavanagh) escaped! Now Thrr-gilag is disgraced, and what fool would let his daughter marry into a disgraced clan? There's only one chance: find a way to pro Thrr-gilag is in trouble. Despite the Conquerors' despicable surprise attack, the Zhirrzh navy was able to fight back, and they even took a prisoner! Thrr-gilag was sent to interrogate the prisoner, figure out where these "humans" come from, and why they attacked without provocation. But before he can get those answers, his prisoner (Pheylan Cavanagh) escaped! Now Thrr-gilag is disgraced, and what fool would let his daughter marry into a disgraced clan? There's only one chance: find a way to prove that Pheylan wasn't lying when he claimed that it wasn't the humans who attacked first. Thrr-gilag's mother wants to die. She ain't afraid of no ghost, she just doesn't want to be one. She is, obviously, a woman, which means she's crazy and unreasonable, so no one will listen to her. But Thrr-gilag is a dutiful son, so of course he's going to try and help his mom. While he is helping his fiancee Klnn-dawan-a with her research, he's approached with an offer: His brother Thrr-mezaz is leading the Zhirrzh counterattack on the Conqueror outpost on Dorcas. There's an unexpected opportunity to spy on the humans if Thrr-gilag can sneak a fsss cutting from a missing ghost over to Thrr-mezaz. Even though Prr't-zevisti, the missing ghost, can't communicate with his ghost wife Prr't-casst-a, he's still doing his best for the war effort by spying on Melinda Cavanaugh. Dr. Cavanaugh is busy doing autopsies on dead Zhirrzh and has no idea she's being haunted. Something that was hinted in the previous book but not fully explained is that when a Zhirrzh's "fsss" organ is "cut" before they die, they become ghosts called "elders". These elders can move back and forth to relay messages. Their telephones are literally ghosts playing telephone. But the fsss cutting is super important: without it, the ghost is stuck or lost. It was a real head-scratcher to find that the aliens weren't lying, they really did think the humans attacked first! The paradox isn't resolved in this book. There's some hints, but with so much going on it's easy to get distracted. The alien perspective is as bizarre as it is mundane and it is freaking awesome how this entire story is told with almost no input from the human characters in the previous book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Loki

    The middle volume of this trilogy takes the unusual step of more or less abandoning the characters of the first volume, to instead look at this human-alien war entirely from the alien side. It's a deep dive into an alien culture that carries the plot forward only a little (although the big twist that's been fairly easy to spot coming since about page 20 of the first volume finally lands in the last pages of this one), while introducing many a complication in a way that makes me wonder how Zahn w The middle volume of this trilogy takes the unusual step of more or less abandoning the characters of the first volume, to instead look at this human-alien war entirely from the alien side. It's a deep dive into an alien culture that carries the plot forward only a little (although the big twist that's been fairly easy to spot coming since about page 20 of the first volume finally lands in the last pages of this one), while introducing many a complication in a way that makes me wonder how Zahn will manage to tie it all together in the final volume. The answer, of course, is that he's Zahn. It's what he does.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    I will say this. It's bold to start a big space opera series and immediately change viewpoints *completely* from one side to the other for the second book. First book? Pretty standard human viewpoints. This book? The enemy from the first book is the entirety of the viewpoint. Not a single human character to be found. Which I'm torn on because it was nice to get an alternate look at events, but now going into the third book I expect that I'm going to be a bit lost for a while as to who is who wit I will say this. It's bold to start a big space opera series and immediately change viewpoints *completely* from one side to the other for the second book. First book? Pretty standard human viewpoints. This book? The enemy from the first book is the entirety of the viewpoint. Not a single human character to be found. Which I'm torn on because it was nice to get an alternate look at events, but now going into the third book I expect that I'm going to be a bit lost for a while as to who is who with any human characters who return and what they did a full book ago. Even if they'd had a handful of small interludes with them, I think I would be happier with it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rod

    I'm not usually much for reading military SF ("war porn", to some folk), but I DO like to read science fiction told from the perspective of a non-human species. So I skipped the first book in this series (which covers many of the same events from the human perspective) and went right for this one, told from the point of view of the alien Zhirr. The best way to describe this book is "immersive": You hit the ground running, with little background explanation of how their alien biology or society w I'm not usually much for reading military SF ("war porn", to some folk), but I DO like to read science fiction told from the perspective of a non-human species. So I skipped the first book in this series (which covers many of the same events from the human perspective) and went right for this one, told from the point of view of the alien Zhirr. The best way to describe this book is "immersive": You hit the ground running, with little background explanation of how their alien biology or society work. And there's no glossary or list of characters to help you out, so you better just keep up!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    I love the change in viewpoint from the humans in book 1 to the aliens in book 2. Seeing the turmoil on both sides of a war is more than an empathy play, it is a brilliant set up for what I'm sure will be an incredible finale! I love the change in viewpoint from the humans in book 1 to the aliens in book 2. Seeing the turmoil on both sides of a war is more than an empathy play, it is a brilliant set up for what I'm sure will be an incredible finale!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alisanne

    the weakest of the three

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rob Markley

    I'm always interesting in deep plausible alien intelligences/civilisations - unfortunately these aliens didn't really delivery I'm always interesting in deep plausible alien intelligences/civilisations - unfortunately these aliens didn't really delivery

  15. 4 out of 5

    Denis

    An interesting premise, but overly long - needn't have been a trilogy. Book 3 is the strongest and brings things together satisfyingly, but it takes an awfully long time to get to that payoff. An interesting premise, but overly long - needn't have been a trilogy. Book 3 is the strongest and brings things together satisfyingly, but it takes an awfully long time to get to that payoff.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Eckenhoff

    A very unique and interesting perspective for telling a space opera

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Very good Very good. Can not wait to read the last book. Good plot development and chacter development. I will enjoy reading his other works.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I give Zahn points for flipping the perspective to the aliens' side for the whole book, though I wish they were a little less human-like. I do like the worlds he creates, but his characters tend to sound an awful lot alike, and that is a weakness here. Still, he clearly had fun coming up with what kind of assumptions an alien race might make about humans and their motivations, and it's fun to go along for that ride. I kind of appreciate that he balances correct and incorrect interpretations, it I give Zahn points for flipping the perspective to the aliens' side for the whole book, though I wish they were a little less human-like. I do like the worlds he creates, but his characters tend to sound an awful lot alike, and that is a weakness here. Still, he clearly had fun coming up with what kind of assumptions an alien race might make about humans and their motivations, and it's fun to go along for that ride. I kind of appreciate that he balances correct and incorrect interpretations, it generates about the right amount of anticipation and frustration as a reader.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Seth the Zest

    More fun space opera. This one dealt more with the aliens and was wholly from their viewpoint. I found it a nice break from expected tropes into something a bit more imaginative.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Filip

    I loved this one! The whole idea of writing a story first from the perspective of humans, then from the aliens is great! It is easy to write a war story from two POVs showing that both sides THINK they are right. It is much harder to write one where both sides ARE indeed right. It is exceptionally hard to show that both sides are certain that they are LOSING the war. Zahn managed to accomplish all of this. What is more important, the Zhirrzh are wonderful! They have fully realized society. On one ha I loved this one! The whole idea of writing a story first from the perspective of humans, then from the aliens is great! It is easy to write a war story from two POVs showing that both sides THINK they are right. It is much harder to write one where both sides ARE indeed right. It is exceptionally hard to show that both sides are certain that they are LOSING the war. Zahn managed to accomplish all of this. What is more important, the Zhirrzh are wonderful! They have fully realized society. On one hand they are in many respect similar to us - deal with politics, paperwork, bureaucracy etc. On the other hand they are just "alien enough: their social issues are NOT a stand-in for any of our own. And Zahn averts the Planet of Hats trope. Of course the reader, knowing the first volume, quickly can discover the main "mystery" and the mistake behind the war, but the characters have no chance of finding it out - just because they and humans are so different. I am very curious to find out how this saga ends.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    2nd "Chapter" adds interest. The 1st book Conquerer's Pride is required reading for this episode. The intriguing thing about this book is it is entirely from the alien's point of view. I don't like to do plot summaries, so suffice it that throughout the story, the war brewing between the 2 parties seems more and more a colossal mistake, possibly fomented by still other aliens. The main impediment to my enjoyment is that the alien Zhirzh are a bit too human, even though having an incredibly uniqu 2nd "Chapter" adds interest. The 1st book Conquerer's Pride is required reading for this episode. The intriguing thing about this book is it is entirely from the alien's point of view. I don't like to do plot summaries, so suffice it that throughout the story, the war brewing between the 2 parties seems more and more a colossal mistake, possibly fomented by still other aliens. The main impediment to my enjoyment is that the alien Zhirzh are a bit too human, even though having an incredibly unique characteristic that shapes their whole society and relationship to other races. Zahn does a nice job of creating their culture, but their motivations are quite excessible and not mysterious, not very alien. That aside, this volume of three is entertaining and the plot moves along for several physically separated but connected characters. I'm ready to start the conclusion- this series really needs to be read together, and is only a trilogy due to normal publishing/financial considerations.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Foomy

    This one is written from the Zhirrzh's (what's the possessive of 'Zirrzh' anyway?) point of view. It also takes place after the events of Pride, so you don't see what exactly what happened at every point during that time from this side, but you pick up the basic idea. The Zirrzh are interesting in that they have essentially conquered death, and that makes for some unique societal features. The chief complaint I have in this book is that it has a touch of "we need a new word for no reason" syndrom This one is written from the Zhirrzh's (what's the possessive of 'Zirrzh' anyway?) point of view. It also takes place after the events of Pride, so you don't see what exactly what happened at every point during that time from this side, but you pick up the basic idea. The Zirrzh are interesting in that they have essentially conquered death, and that makes for some unique societal features. The chief complaint I have in this book is that it has a touch of "we need a new word for no reason" syndrome (also known as Anathem-itis). It breaks the flow if you have to stop and mentally translate "beat" and "hunbeat" every other sentence, even if it only takes you a fraction of a second. The rest of the book is "translated" into english for our benefit, what was wrong with "seconds" and "minutes?" Still, Zahn exercises his world-building muscles yet again in this one, and he crafts a whole believable society in a fairly short period of time. That alone makes this worth reading.

  23. 5 out of 5

    R. August

    I was hoping that this second book would continue the trend of the first, but I was sadly mistaken. Rather than a bunch of incomprehensible names and switching out time words (minute, hour, day, etc) with equally burdensome names (tenarc, thoustride) in order to make the aliens seem alien, just made the text an annoyance to get through since, outside of changing the vocabulary a little, there was absolutely nothing alien about the aliens. This happens a lot in sci-fi, the humans talk about how a I was hoping that this second book would continue the trend of the first, but I was sadly mistaken. Rather than a bunch of incomprehensible names and switching out time words (minute, hour, day, etc) with equally burdensome names (tenarc, thoustride) in order to make the aliens seem alien, just made the text an annoyance to get through since, outside of changing the vocabulary a little, there was absolutely nothing alien about the aliens. This happens a lot in sci-fi, the humans talk about how aliens don't think like us, won't feel like us, etc., but it turns out that outside of the burden of dredging through "When Xndsyx-dhezmmndn-xnxnxnxxxx looked at his watch, he saw that that it was 3 humbeats past tenarc before laternoon" there is nothing alien about it at all - which would be interesting if that was the point he was trying to make - that we and aliens are actually alike- but it wasn't, so it isn't.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Lloyd

    When an author decides to write a book from the point of view of an alien race, they have to make a touch decision. Do they write very similarly to human point of view, using the same speech patterns, ideologies, units of measure, etc, or do they write from a very alien point of view? The former makes a novel easier to digest and understand, while the latter definitely feels more alien, but at the risk of not letting you get as immersed in the story. Zahn chose the latter, which many may love, b When an author decides to write a book from the point of view of an alien race, they have to make a touch decision. Do they write very similarly to human point of view, using the same speech patterns, ideologies, units of measure, etc, or do they write from a very alien point of view? The former makes a novel easier to digest and understand, while the latter definitely feels more alien, but at the risk of not letting you get as immersed in the story. Zahn chose the latter, which many may love, but for me, it took me out of the story as I struggled to assign human parallels to the alien culture. As such, I did not enjoy this book nearly as much as the first in the trilogy. But I am definitely moving on to the 3rd.

  25. 4 out of 5

    John

    This is the second book in a sci-fi trilogy. The first book was hard for me to put down, so I was disappointed when I discovered that book 2 switches the point of view of the narrative from the human characters that are featured in book 1 to the alien characters that are the bad guys in book 1. It wasn't until the last few chapters of this book that I felt as hooked as I had with the first book. Conquerors' Heritage is still a good read, and perhaps I would have enjoyed it quite a bit more if it This is the second book in a sci-fi trilogy. The first book was hard for me to put down, so I was disappointed when I discovered that book 2 switches the point of view of the narrative from the human characters that are featured in book 1 to the alien characters that are the bad guys in book 1. It wasn't until the last few chapters of this book that I felt as hooked as I had with the first book. Conquerors' Heritage is still a good read, and perhaps I would have enjoyed it quite a bit more if it hadn't followed the more interesting Conquerors' Pride.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    The second in the series, written more from the point of view of the opposing force, the Conquerers. I found this added to my interest and kept the plot moving forward well. It also allowed Zahn to revisit some of the earlier episodes and fill in motivation for the aliens behavior, something most authors don't take the time to do. It is important in this case because the plot hinges on these moments. Once again, if you are a fan of what I call "good ole' sci-fi", well-plotted, character-driven, The second in the series, written more from the point of view of the opposing force, the Conquerers. I found this added to my interest and kept the plot moving forward well. It also allowed Zahn to revisit some of the earlier episodes and fill in motivation for the aliens behavior, something most authors don't take the time to do. It is important in this case because the plot hinges on these moments. Once again, if you are a fan of what I call "good ole' sci-fi", well-plotted, character-driven, hard science, etc, you will likely enjoy this second installment.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Pretty good book, though it takes a bit of getting used to. It continues the story started in Conquerors' Pride, but from the side of the "invaders". Interestingly enough, they are under the impression that the humans began the conflict. It did take a bit of getting used to some of the terminology, and at times I found myself a bit lost, but once I got into the flow of the story it was every bit as gripping as the first book. Pretty good book, though it takes a bit of getting used to. It continues the story started in Conquerors' Pride, but from the side of the "invaders". Interestingly enough, they are under the impression that the humans began the conflict. It did take a bit of getting used to some of the terminology, and at times I found myself a bit lost, but once I got into the flow of the story it was every bit as gripping as the first book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Truly fascinating by virtue of it's focus on the prior works "villains". These are handled with tremendous detail and insight into their culture, birthed out of their unique extra-sensory physiology; a compelling metaphor on euthanasia and the right to die, coupled with thrilling narratives on the ongoing stalemate of a war with the humans. Ends on a brilliant cliff Lhanger, setting up not only for the conclusion in "Legacy", but the core MISUNDERSTANDING that threatens to destroy them both. Truly fascinating by virtue of it's focus on the prior works "villains". These are handled with tremendous detail and insight into their culture, birthed out of their unique extra-sensory physiology; a compelling metaphor on euthanasia and the right to die, coupled with thrilling narratives on the ongoing stalemate of a war with the humans. Ends on a brilliant cliff Lhanger, setting up not only for the conclusion in "Legacy", but the core MISUNDERSTANDING that threatens to destroy them both.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cathleen Ash

    In this second book of three, Pheylan has been rescued by his brother Aric and the Commonwealth continues to dealw with a deadly and dangerous agressor: the Zhirrzh. The races are more clearly developed, and even more of the Zhirrzh become likeable characters as the war continues between the Zhirrzh and the Commonwealth. Enter the Mrachianis - and decide for yourself whether they are as helpless as they seem - or whether they are indeed manipulating both species to their own benefit.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Hmmm... hard to rate this book. And I'm tempted to wait until reading the finale, but I won't. I didn't like it at all for most of the first half and I nearly gave up on it. I'm glad I didn't though as it got going and I was fully engaged by the end. I'm tempted to go to three stars, but I'll stick with two. It's quite a feat to write a whole book from the alien perspective and hopefully I'll get the pay-off in the last book. Hmmm... hard to rate this book. And I'm tempted to wait until reading the finale, but I won't. I didn't like it at all for most of the first half and I nearly gave up on it. I'm glad I didn't though as it got going and I was fully engaged by the end. I'm tempted to go to three stars, but I'll stick with two. It's quite a feat to write a whole book from the alien perspective and hopefully I'll get the pay-off in the last book.

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