web site hit counter Women as World Builders Studies in Modern Feminism - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Women as World Builders Studies in Modern Feminism

Availability: Ready to download

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.


Compare

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

35 review for Women as World Builders Studies in Modern Feminism

  1. 4 out of 5

    Viola

    I saw this as I was looking to read Olive Schreiner s Dreams. as she is one of the women who is discussed in the book. The title was intriguing and reading contemporary thoughts on the Suffragette movement from a male perspective seemed interesting and, I have to admit, too good to be true. Unfortunately, the latter was the case. The first chapter serves as a general introduction to the movement and concludes with the idea that the rise of feminism happened because men wanted it to, as they grew I saw this as I was looking to read Olive Schreiner s Dreams. as she is one of the women who is discussed in the book. The title was intriguing and reading contemporary thoughts on the Suffragette movement from a male perspective seemed interesting and, I have to admit, too good to be true. Unfortunately, the latter was the case. The first chapter serves as a general introduction to the movement and concludes with the idea that the rise of feminism happened because men wanted it to, as they grew tired of subservient and passive women. After all, the only reason women do anything is to please men. I’m not exaggerating (I wish I were): "The fact is, as has been bitterly recited by the rebellious leaders of their sex, that women have always been what man wanted them to be—have changed to suit his changing ideals. The fact is, furthermore, that the woman's movement of today is but another example of that readiness of women to adapt themselves to a masculine demand. Men are tired of subservient women; or, to speak more exactly, of the seemingly subservient woman who effects her will by stealth—the pretty slave with all the slave's subtlety and cleverness. " "And what more fitting than that a man should sit in judgment upon the contemporary aspects of that movement, weighing out approval or disapproval! Such criticism is not a masculine impertinence but a masculine right, a right properly pertaining to those who are responsible for the movement, and whose demands it must ultimately fulfill." On why men resist the feminist movement: "Why, then, have men appeared hostile to the woman's rebellion? Because what men desire are real individuals who have achieved their own freedom. It will not do to pluck freedom like a flower and give it to the lady with a polite bow. She must fight for it." The conlcuding idea is far from the only issue: "I have hearkened to the voice of modern science, which tells me that woman is an inferior being, with a weak body, a stunted mind, poor in creative power, poor in imagination, poor in critical capacity—a being who does not know how to work, nor how to talk, nor how to play! I hope no one will imagine that I am making these charges up maliciously out of my own head: such a notion would indicate that a century of pamphleteering on the woman question had made no impression on a mind saturated in the ideology of popular fiction." "The woman who finds her work will find her love—and I do not doubt will cherish it bravely. But the woman who sets her love above everything else I would gently dismiss from our present consideration as belonging to the courtesan type. It is not very well understood what the courtesan really is, and so I pause to describe her briefly. It is not necessary to transgress certain moral customs to be a courtesan; on the other hand, the term may accurately be applied to women of irreproachable morals. There are some women who find their destiny in the bearing and rearing of children, others who demand independent work like men, and still others who make a career of charming, stimulating, and comforting men. These types, of course, merge and combine; and then there is that vast class of women who belong to none of these types—who are not good for anything!" Clearly, I don't find this an acceptable perspective on feminism or women. At all. At the same time, I didn't want to write off this book completely so I read on. But it doesn't get better: "Mrs. Gilman is not under the illusion that the conditions of work outside the home are perfect; she is, indeed, a socialist, and as such is engaged in the great task of revolutionizing the basis of modern industry. But she has looked into women's souls, and turned away in disgust at the likeness of a dirty kitchen which those souls present." "In a book by H. G. Wells, which contains a very bitter attack on the woman's suffrage movement (I refer to "Ann Veronica"), she is described as "implacable"; and I believe that it is she to whom Mr. Wells refers as being "as incapable of argument as a steam roller broken loose." The same things might have been said of Sherman on his dreadful march to the sea. These phrases, malicious as they are, contain what I am inclined to accept as an accurate description of Mrs. Pankhurst's temperament." This is where I had enough. I did peruse the rest of the book but I dediced it's not worth more of my time. I'm not saying it's all bad but there are tons of better books and essays about feminism.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ms_prue

    To save you having to read it, here are the women "studied", so you can go read them in their own words, and skip this book entirely: Charlotte Perkins Gilman Emmeline Pankhurst and Jane Addams Olive Schreiner and Isadora Duncan Beatrice Webb and Emma Goldman Margaret Dreier Robins Ellen Key Dora Marsden Alas I don't have access to a time machine to go back to 1913 and kinkshame this author to his face. Men are tired of subservient women; or, to speak more exactly, of the seemingly subservient woman who To save you having to read it, here are the women "studied", so you can go read them in their own words, and skip this book entirely: Charlotte Perkins Gilman Emmeline Pankhurst and Jane Addams Olive Schreiner and Isadora Duncan Beatrice Webb and Emma Goldman Margaret Dreier Robins Ellen Key Dora Marsden Alas I don't have access to a time machine to go back to 1913 and kinkshame this author to his face. Men are tired of subservient women; or, to speak more exactly, of the seemingly subservient woman who effects her will by stealth—the pretty slave with all the slave's subtlety and cleverness. So long as it was possible for men to imagine themselves masters, they were satisfied. But when they found out that they were dupes, they wanted a change. If only for self-protection, they desired to find in woman a comrade and an equal. In reality they desired it because it promised to be more fun. [...] It is, then, as a phase of the great human renaissance inaugurated by men that the woman's movement deserves to be considered. And what more fitting than that a man should sit in judgment upon the contemporary aspects of that movement, weighing out approval or disapproval! Such criticism is not a masculine impertinence but a masculine right, a right properly pertaining to those who are responsible for the movement, and whose demands it must ultimately fulfill.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  5. 5 out of 5

    ג'ס הופמן

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christy

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tommy

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

  9. 5 out of 5

    Frances Donovan

  10. 5 out of 5

    NiJaal

  11. 5 out of 5

    Diana Rosengard

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  13. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Catseye Diamond

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Jacobs

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adele

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Hall

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  23. 5 out of 5

    Valerio

  24. 4 out of 5

    Roxana Chirilă

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ed

  26. 4 out of 5

    Autumn Forrester-Light

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Wilson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eden

  30. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

  31. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Agnew

  32. 5 out of 5

    Connie Rotunda

  33. 5 out of 5

    Emma Que

  34. 4 out of 5

    Jessie Thatcher

  35. 4 out of 5

    Cypress Butane

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.