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Widely endorsed by American Indian scholars, American Indians, provides an Indian perspective on common misconceptions concerning American Indians. “Mihesuah’s work should be required reading for elementary and upper level teachers, college instructors and parents. Let us hope it finds a wide readership in mainstream circles.” Joel Monture, Multicultural Review “Professor Mi Widely endorsed by American Indian scholars, American Indians, provides an Indian perspective on common misconceptions concerning American Indians. “Mihesuah’s work should be required reading for elementary and upper level teachers, college instructors and parents. Let us hope it finds a wide readership in mainstream circles.” Joel Monture, Multicultural Review “Professor Mihesuah goes beyond simply providing responses to common stereotypes. She provides the reader with assistance in efforts to improve understanding of her peoples... a valuable contribution in bringing greater clarity to important issues.” Alejandro Garcia, Journal of Multicultural Social Work “Devon Mihesuah has provided precious insight into the racial identity and cultural struggles of American Indians... I applaud Devon Mihesuah for successfully confronting the literature of false portrayal and negative images of Indian people.” Dr. Donald L. Fixico, Professor of History Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo (Shawnee, Sac & Fox, Creek, Seminole) “A good sourcebook for dispelling misconceptions and negative stereotypes about American Indians. These beliefs and attitudes exist and these statements are made in academic settings. It is fortunate that there are professors like Devon Mihesuah in classrooms to present the 'other side,' perhaps only once in the lifetime of some students...” Dr. Karen Swisher, Director, Center for Indian Education Arizona State University (Standing Rock Sioux) “This book will be a very useful reader for anyone truly trying to understand who American Indians really are. There is no other book on Indian images that provides the Indian “voice” that Devon maintains throughout the text.” Dr. Duane Champagne, Director UCLA American Indian Studies Center Editor, American Indian Culture and Research Journal (Turtle Mountain Chippewa) “Devon Mihesuah is one of the most gifted Native American scholars in the country today.” Robert A. Williams, Jr., Professor of Law University of Arizona, Tucson (Lumbee) “Amusing and a helpful guide to general readers not that familiar with the national Indian community” Dr. Terry P. Wilson, Native American Studies University of California, Berkeley (Potawatomie)


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Widely endorsed by American Indian scholars, American Indians, provides an Indian perspective on common misconceptions concerning American Indians. “Mihesuah’s work should be required reading for elementary and upper level teachers, college instructors and parents. Let us hope it finds a wide readership in mainstream circles.” Joel Monture, Multicultural Review “Professor Mi Widely endorsed by American Indian scholars, American Indians, provides an Indian perspective on common misconceptions concerning American Indians. “Mihesuah’s work should be required reading for elementary and upper level teachers, college instructors and parents. Let us hope it finds a wide readership in mainstream circles.” Joel Monture, Multicultural Review “Professor Mihesuah goes beyond simply providing responses to common stereotypes. She provides the reader with assistance in efforts to improve understanding of her peoples... a valuable contribution in bringing greater clarity to important issues.” Alejandro Garcia, Journal of Multicultural Social Work “Devon Mihesuah has provided precious insight into the racial identity and cultural struggles of American Indians... I applaud Devon Mihesuah for successfully confronting the literature of false portrayal and negative images of Indian people.” Dr. Donald L. Fixico, Professor of History Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo (Shawnee, Sac & Fox, Creek, Seminole) “A good sourcebook for dispelling misconceptions and negative stereotypes about American Indians. These beliefs and attitudes exist and these statements are made in academic settings. It is fortunate that there are professors like Devon Mihesuah in classrooms to present the 'other side,' perhaps only once in the lifetime of some students...” Dr. Karen Swisher, Director, Center for Indian Education Arizona State University (Standing Rock Sioux) “This book will be a very useful reader for anyone truly trying to understand who American Indians really are. There is no other book on Indian images that provides the Indian “voice” that Devon maintains throughout the text.” Dr. Duane Champagne, Director UCLA American Indian Studies Center Editor, American Indian Culture and Research Journal (Turtle Mountain Chippewa) “Devon Mihesuah is one of the most gifted Native American scholars in the country today.” Robert A. Williams, Jr., Professor of Law University of Arizona, Tucson (Lumbee) “Amusing and a helpful guide to general readers not that familiar with the national Indian community” Dr. Terry P. Wilson, Native American Studies University of California, Berkeley (Potawatomie)

30 review for American Indians: Stereotypes & Realities

  1. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    I came across this book while placing a hold on Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz's An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States at my library. It's a collection of short essays (most are 2-4 pages) debunking stereotypes - exactly what you'd expect from the title, and it's not false advertising. I was particularly interested in Mihesuah's discussion of religion in many American Indian societies. I came across this book while placing a hold on Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz's An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States at my library. It's a collection of short essays (most are 2-4 pages) debunking stereotypes - exactly what you'd expect from the title, and it's not false advertising. I was particularly interested in Mihesuah's discussion of religion in many American Indian societies.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mari

    Devon A. Mihesuah is a Professor of History in the University of Arizona. This book was to make corrections in people's thinkings of what American Indians are supposed to look and act like. She begins each chapter with a stereotype and counters it with an actual reality of how American Indians live and survive in the Euro-American society of today known as the United States. This is not a thorough biography about all American Indians, it is only a synapse. In addition, she includes countless of Devon A. Mihesuah is a Professor of History in the University of Arizona. This book was to make corrections in people's thinkings of what American Indians are supposed to look and act like. She begins each chapter with a stereotype and counters it with an actual reality of how American Indians live and survive in the Euro-American society of today known as the United States. This is not a thorough biography about all American Indians, it is only a synapse. In addition, she includes countless of recommended books that educators and non-Indians can read in order to educate themselves properly, and thus begin dialogues across non-Indians and Indians alike in getting the full story of not just the conquerors but of also those who have been murdered inhumanely by the ancestors who considered themselves "civilized."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Boyer-Kelly

    A quick introduction to some of the more common stereotypes facing American Indian peoples. I do, however, agree that some of these stereotypes can seem dated at times (in some cases, this is a good thing if people are no longer seeing some of these ignorant stereotypes). That being said, because of the briefness of the book, there is a lot left to be discussed when it comes to many of these issues. I would consider this a "quick read" for those that need the most basic introduction--from there, A quick introduction to some of the more common stereotypes facing American Indian peoples. I do, however, agree that some of these stereotypes can seem dated at times (in some cases, this is a good thing if people are no longer seeing some of these ignorant stereotypes). That being said, because of the briefness of the book, there is a lot left to be discussed when it comes to many of these issues. I would consider this a "quick read" for those that need the most basic introduction--from there, you should definitely do more in-depth research if you're working in the field of American Indian Studies or another interdisciplinary degree. In short, this isn't all of the answers. It is just a quick summary. The tone of the book is something that some students (I've had students read selections from this text in a course I was a Graduate Teaching Assistant in) enjoy, because it is not 'as scholarly' as some of the 'dry' and/or 'boring' material that they are assigned. That being said, I've also had students that are put off by the tone of the book (there is indeed anger towards colonization--that I believe is founded--but it does disturb some readers). So if you're using this as an educator, it may be a good idea to have a discussion about how different students perceive the book. A good introduction to stereotypes. Note to the publisher: There are some editing issues throughout, and you should probably work on these in any future publications.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Peggah Ghoreishi

    The tone of this book isn't as academic as I expected, and as someone who identifies as American and non-Indian, I felt insulted and defensive throughout most of the book. Some good material should make you uncomfortable at times, and this definitely worked. Some of the tone of this book seemed like a tumblr post ranting about ignorant white people. Most of this book was very depressing when you realize the truths of history. However, it is incredibly important for people to read. While my person The tone of this book isn't as academic as I expected, and as someone who identifies as American and non-Indian, I felt insulted and defensive throughout most of the book. Some good material should make you uncomfortable at times, and this definitely worked. Some of the tone of this book seemed like a tumblr post ranting about ignorant white people. Most of this book was very depressing when you realize the truths of history. However, it is incredibly important for people to read. While my personal experience is far different from the author, I cannot claim that her experience is not true because I didn't experience it. I am lucky that instead of being around Indian stereotypes, I was simply around Indian invisibility. This book makes me eager to learn more in a primary source way, however, it is difficult to understand how to balance this desire with my desire to be socially aware and just. Since this book was printed about 20 years ago, I would like to see an update, and a more fleshed out book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Diversity Horror

    A Must Read! This book should be required reading for every student and anyone going into education. The book not only addresses common misconceptions and stereotypes about American Indians, but also provides readers with the information they need to do further research (respectfully of course), teach non-Native children about Native cultures and history, and combat stereotypes and racism. If you were like me, you did not learn much about American Indians in school (other than the very misleading A Must Read! This book should be required reading for every student and anyone going into education. The book not only addresses common misconceptions and stereotypes about American Indians, but also provides readers with the information they need to do further research (respectfully of course), teach non-Native children about Native cultures and history, and combat stereotypes and racism. If you were like me, you did not learn much about American Indians in school (other than the very misleading “Thanksgiving story) and you owe it to yourself and others to pick up this book and fill in the missing pieces in your education.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Akiko

    4.5/5 This is a very good and interesting introduction book about native Americans. The stereotype v. reality format makes it clear and accessible to all. There is so much that I didn't know, and even if it's 150 pages long, I've learnt so much. Mihesuah also gives a thorough bibliography for each stereotype she debunks, that is why in my opinion this is a good introductory book. 4.5/5 This is a very good and interesting introduction book about native Americans. The stereotype v. reality format makes it clear and accessible to all. There is so much that I didn't know, and even if it's 150 pages long, I've learnt so much. Mihesuah also gives a thorough bibliography for each stereotype she debunks, that is why in my opinion this is a good introductory book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Edward ott

    a great book and a must read for anyone teaching anthropology or history.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ursula

    This is a short book with short chapters each addressing different stereotypes of Native Americans. I got this book when I took Intro to American Indian Studies back in 2001. I think I read a few chapters back then, but it was worth reading again. The interesting thing was how dated the book felt to me. A lot of the stereotypes were either "news to me" or "people really think that?" I also noticed that a new stereotype was completely missing, that being the one about Native Americans and casinos. This is a short book with short chapters each addressing different stereotypes of Native Americans. I got this book when I took Intro to American Indian Studies back in 2001. I think I read a few chapters back then, but it was worth reading again. The interesting thing was how dated the book felt to me. A lot of the stereotypes were either "news to me" or "people really think that?" I also noticed that a new stereotype was completely missing, that being the one about Native Americans and casinos. A lot of people think that all Indians are suddenly rich because of casinos, but the fact is that they are not. Indians do call casinos "the new buffalo" (I think thats right) because it is a new means of wealth for some tribes, but it not a final solution. I would be interested to hear the author's reaction to the book 1491 because there was a "myth" that Indians came across the Bering land-bridge. The "reality" was that Indians have their own creation stories. Thats fine, and people should realize that Indians do not like anthropologists, but personally..... come on. Thats basically a creationist argument. It doesn't really matter if Native Americans originally came from Asia or not. That doesn't justify their treatment in any way.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Have owned this book for awhile and finally sat down and read it. It was very interesting to hear about now only the realities, but what the perceived stereotypes are about American Indians. It seems just ridiculous that people actually think some of these things, that they can generalize about a group of people in such a negative way and not see the problem with doing so. I think this is a helpful little book to read, but I sometimes struggle with books that defend a group of people, as they te Have owned this book for awhile and finally sat down and read it. It was very interesting to hear about now only the realities, but what the perceived stereotypes are about American Indians. It seems just ridiculous that people actually think some of these things, that they can generalize about a group of people in such a negative way and not see the problem with doing so. I think this is a helpful little book to read, but I sometimes struggle with books that defend a group of people, as they tend to defend one group while belittling another. I think any group can stand on its own, and can be defended on its own merits, not in comparison to another group.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book is fantastic! It's a quick read but it does a wonderful job of shedding light on stereotypes regarding Native Americans. For instance, how many of your family members swear there is an Indian Chief or Princess in your heritage because of they high cheek bones, but can't quite find where this descendent is in the family tree? I had several "I knew it!" moments. Give this a shot. This book is fantastic! It's a quick read but it does a wonderful job of shedding light on stereotypes regarding Native Americans. For instance, how many of your family members swear there is an Indian Chief or Princess in your heritage because of they high cheek bones, but can't quite find where this descendent is in the family tree? I had several "I knew it!" moments. Give this a shot.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kim Adamache

    Nice short read that discusses and unwraps typical stereotypes and assumptions about the Native American's life, habits, and origins. Recommend for anyone interested or researching this topic. Nice short read that discusses and unwraps typical stereotypes and assumptions about the Native American's life, habits, and origins. Recommend for anyone interested or researching this topic.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I ordered this book without thumbing through it first. I expected better from this author.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    My copy could have used a copy editor.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tyler January

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzie Mackling

  17. 4 out of 5

    MB Shakespeare

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Rix

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mackenzie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

  21. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

  23. 5 out of 5

    Izabela

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Graupmann

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Rumps

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bwickre

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ceilon Aspensen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vera Wagstaff (ballerinabluereads)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daina Imperiale

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Dearing

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