web site hit counter Realm of the Saint: Power and Authority in Moroccan Sufism - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Realm of the Saint: Power and Authority in Moroccan Sufism

Availability: Ready to download

In premodern Moroccan Sufism, sainthood involved not only a closeness to the Divine presence (walaya) but also the exercise of worldly authority (wilaya). The Moroccan Jazuliyya Sufi order used the doctrine that the saint was a "substitute of the prophets" and personification of a universal "Muhammadan Reality" to justify nearly one hundred years of Sufi involvement in Mor In premodern Moroccan Sufism, sainthood involved not only a closeness to the Divine presence (walaya) but also the exercise of worldly authority (wilaya). The Moroccan Jazuliyya Sufi order used the doctrine that the saint was a "substitute of the prophets" and personification of a universal "Muhammadan Reality" to justify nearly one hundred years of Sufi involvement in Moroccan political life, which led to the creation of the sharifian state. This book presents a systematic history of Moroccan Sufism through the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries C.E. and a comprehensive study of Moroccan Sufi doctrine, focusing on the concept of sainthood. Vincent J. Cornell engages in a sociohistorical analysis of Sufi institutions, a critical examination of hagiography as a source for history, a study of the Sufi model of sainthood in relation to social and political life, and a sociological analysis of more than three hundred biographies of saints. He concludes by identifying eight indigenous ideal types of saint that are linked to specific forms of authority. Taken together, they define sainthood as a socioreligious institution in Morocco.


Compare

In premodern Moroccan Sufism, sainthood involved not only a closeness to the Divine presence (walaya) but also the exercise of worldly authority (wilaya). The Moroccan Jazuliyya Sufi order used the doctrine that the saint was a "substitute of the prophets" and personification of a universal "Muhammadan Reality" to justify nearly one hundred years of Sufi involvement in Mor In premodern Moroccan Sufism, sainthood involved not only a closeness to the Divine presence (walaya) but also the exercise of worldly authority (wilaya). The Moroccan Jazuliyya Sufi order used the doctrine that the saint was a "substitute of the prophets" and personification of a universal "Muhammadan Reality" to justify nearly one hundred years of Sufi involvement in Moroccan political life, which led to the creation of the sharifian state. This book presents a systematic history of Moroccan Sufism through the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries C.E. and a comprehensive study of Moroccan Sufi doctrine, focusing on the concept of sainthood. Vincent J. Cornell engages in a sociohistorical analysis of Sufi institutions, a critical examination of hagiography as a source for history, a study of the Sufi model of sainthood in relation to social and political life, and a sociological analysis of more than three hundred biographies of saints. He concludes by identifying eight indigenous ideal types of saint that are linked to specific forms of authority. Taken together, they define sainthood as a socioreligious institution in Morocco.

33 review for Realm of the Saint: Power and Authority in Moroccan Sufism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Pie charts are the last thing one expects in a book about Moroccan Sufism. This book is that authoritative and discusses the thought of what seems to be every thinker during the Berber monarchies that ruled medieval Morocco and the short-lived Arab Saadi dynasty that followed it. We have their travels, the schools they formed, their sometimes rancorous disputations, their conception of jihad (which is not necessarily war, it must always be noted). The record of intellectual vitality is stunning Pie charts are the last thing one expects in a book about Moroccan Sufism. This book is that authoritative and discusses the thought of what seems to be every thinker during the Berber monarchies that ruled medieval Morocco and the short-lived Arab Saadi dynasty that followed it. We have their travels, the schools they formed, their sometimes rancorous disputations, their conception of jihad (which is not necessarily war, it must always be noted). The record of intellectual vitality is stunning at a time when those on the northern shore of the Mediterranean were not quite as alert. But that doesn't mean that the mass of detail always quickens the pulse.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Raihan

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abood

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bubba

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Dziedzic

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ray

  7. 5 out of 5

    snuffal

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barış

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

  11. 4 out of 5

    Armaan S

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rezap0ur

  13. 5 out of 5

    C. Brown

  14. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  15. 5 out of 5

    University of Texas Press

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nina

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jehanzeb Ali

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rashid

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nassim Chaoui

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ema

  21. 4 out of 5

    Azzam anwar

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marcel Côté

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Holt

  24. 4 out of 5

    Baha'uddin Peter

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marniyah

  26. 4 out of 5

    Saquib

  27. 5 out of 5

    Daud Perrault

  28. 4 out of 5

    Katy James

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mohamad Ballan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Janet Webster

  31. 5 out of 5

    Syafiq.H

  32. 4 out of 5

    Hamza

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sundus

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.