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Enduring Cowboys: Life in the New Mexico Saddle

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Explores the advent of the vaquero in sixteenth-century New Mexico and continues through the years to the authentic working cowboy of today.


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Explores the advent of the vaquero in sixteenth-century New Mexico and continues through the years to the authentic working cowboy of today.

3 review for Enduring Cowboys: Life in the New Mexico Saddle

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    This handsomely designed book is a tribute to the cowboys of New Mexico and a mixture of both romance and reality. Unlike most books of cowboy photography, with picturesque and colorful shots of riding horses, branding cattle, and the like, this one is devoted simply to black-and-white portrait shots of men and women who have worked ranches all or most of their lives. The accompanying character profiles provide short personal histories with quotes from interviews with them. At intervals are six e This handsomely designed book is a tribute to the cowboys of New Mexico and a mixture of both romance and reality. Unlike most books of cowboy photography, with picturesque and colorful shots of riding horses, branding cattle, and the like, this one is devoted simply to black-and-white portrait shots of men and women who have worked ranches all or most of their lives. The accompanying character profiles provide short personal histories with quotes from interviews with them. At intervals are six essays about cowboys by various authors. One traces the history of New Mexico's first cowboys, the vaqueros; another essay describes the pressure from environmentalists on the cattle industry. Another traces the emergence of the cowboy hero in early pulp fiction, literature, movies, TV, and country music, with a still of Kirk Douglas as Jack Burns, cutting a barbed wire fence in "Lonely are the Brave." A gem of an essay is a humorous, warm-hearted celebration of cowboys, written in 1937 by cowboy writer John L. Sinclair, called "Bow Legs." The photo accompanying this essay is priceless: a rear shot of a bow-legged modern-day cowboy in fringed chaps, striped shirt, and wranglers. Another essay is devoted to ranching and cowboying on New Mexico's Indian reservations, and there are several photos of members of a Navajo ranching family. Meanwhile, the end pages are a reproduction of a striking western panting by artist Gary Morton. Published by New Mexico magazine, this is an excellent addition to any bookshelf of Southwestern photography.

  2. 5 out of 5

    R

  3. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

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